postheadericon Stampede ready for 2016 celebration

NFR qualifier Jean Winters of Texline, Texas, rounds the second barrel during a recent competition of the Will Rogers stampede. The 2016 edition of the award-winning rodeo will take place next week in Claremore, Okla.

NFR qualifier Jean Winters of Texline, Texas, rounds the second barrel during a recent competition of the Will Rogers stampede. The 2016 edition of the award-winning rodeo will take place next week in Claremore, Okla.

CLAREMORE, Okla. – After months of planning and intense labor around their arena, the organizers of the Will Rogers Stampede PRCA Rodeo are ready for the event’s 70th anniversary celebration.

“From the time we closed the curtain on our 2015 rodeo, we began the process for this year’s rodeo,” said David Petty, chairman of the volunteer committee that produces the annual rodeo, set for 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 27-Sunday, May 29, at Will Rogers Stampede Arena. “We wanted to make this our best rodeo ever.”

David Petty

David Petty

That’s going to be quite a task. The Will Rogers Stampede was named the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association’s Small Rodeo of the Year in 2014 and ’15, and nearly 550 contestants are scheduled to compete next week in Claremore.

“Because this is our 70th year and because this community has been such a great supporter of this rodeo and helped us get the Rodeo of the Year awards, we really wanted to make a statement in 2016,” Petty said. “That’s why we’ve worked closely with City Manager Jim Thomas and the city of Claremore. We’re having the Downtown Hoedown to open the celebration on Thursday night, and we’ve got three great concerts that will follow each of the three performances of our rodeo.”

Tickets are on sale through the event’s website, www.WillRogersStampede.com, and include family packs and adult passes offered at a significant discount online. The Stampede parade returns, and it begins at 10 a.m. Saturday.  The featured Red Dirt/Texas Music acts will be Adam Hood on Friday, Cooder Graw on Saturday and Cody Canada and The Departed to close out the weekend Sunday night.

“We’re extremely excited about our concert lineup,” Petty said, noting that volunteers have worked diligently to build a stage that is set up on the east side of the arena facing the stands. “To have acts like Cooder Graw and Cody Canada in Claremore is a big deal.”

Yes, it is. But there’s no better opening act in Rogers County than the award-winning rodeo, featuring the production and incredible animal athletes from Pete Carr Pro Rodeo, which has been recognized as one of the top five stock contracting firms in the PRCA.

The rodeo also will feature the comedy of Gizmo McCracken, who has been nominated as the PRCA Comedy Act of the Year six times. Skydiver Bobby Reid makes his return to bring in Old Glory from the air for all three performances.

“I love coming to Claremore,” said Reid, who lives in Montrose, Iowa. “The people are so friendly, and the committee there is amazing. They make me feel at home in Claremore.”

Many people feel that same way, which is why the local committee has worked so hard to make sure this year’s celebration is memorable.

“We don’t volunteer for this for the awards, so we’re not going to sit back and let our past define us,” Petty said. “We want to just keep getting better and make this a showcase every year.”

postheadericon Carr team key to Stampede’s success

CLAREMORE, Okla. – A commitment to rodeo fans in northeastern Oklahoma is a big reason for the success of the Will Rogers Stampede PRCA Rodeo.

Members of the Professional Rodeo Association have taken note of that distinction, and it’s a key reason why they have recognized Claremore’s rodeo as the Small Rodeo of the Year in 2014 and 2015. A big part of that award-winning atmosphere is the overall production of the rodeo and the outstanding animal athletes that are part of the competition.

Saddle bronc rider Jesse James Kirby of Dodge City, Kan., watches after bucking off Pete Carr's Classic Pro Rodeo's Spur Strap during the 2016 Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo. Spur Strap is one of many Carr animals that have been selected to perform at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

Saddle bronc rider Jesse James Kirby of Dodge City, Kan., watches after bucking off Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Spur Strap during the 2016 Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo. Spur Strap is one of many Carr animals that have been selected to perform at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

“Having Pete Carr Pro Rodeo as our producer has been a big part of our rodeo’s success,” said David Petty, chairman of the volunteer committee that organizes the annual rodeo, set for 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 27-Sunday, May 29, at Will Rogers Stampede Arena.

Tickets are on sale through the event’s website, www.WillRogersStampede.com, and include family packs and adult passes offered at a significant discount online.

“One of the things small rodeo committees are struggling with is we must have a product to keep people coming back, and Pete Carr Pro Rodeo brings that product that entices people to want to see that show,” he said. “Once people see it, the chances of them becoming a regular at the rodeo are higher.”

The Stampede will honor its 70th anniversary this year with a grand celebration, from the Downtown Hoedown on Thursday, May 26, to concerts after every rodeo performance: Adam Hood on Friday, Cooder Graw on Saturday and Cody Canada and The Departed on Sunday.

This year also marks the fourth straight season the Carr team has been part of Claremore’s rodeo production. It’s no coincidence that the Will Rogers Stampede has been named the top small rodeo two of the three years Carr has produced the event.

“Pete has been nominated as Stock Contractor of the Year four straight times, and he has the type of production and the kinds of animals that the contestants want to be associated with when they get to Claremore,” Petty said. “We’re proud to have an award-winning rodeo in Claremore, but a big part of that is having Pete and so many people he brings to town that are award winners, too.”

Over the last three seasons, the Carr firm has had more animals selected to perform at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo than any other livestock producer. There are 548 contestants that are scheduled to compete in Claremore this spring, which is a considerable statement to both the rodeo committee and the Carr team.

“We work really hard all year to produce the rodeos and feature the stock that will draw the top cowboys,” said Pete Carr, owner of the Dallas-based company. “We have a great group of hard-working people who care about the sport and everything that goes into it.”

The contestants know that, too.

“He’s surrounded himself with people who know what they’re talking about,” said saddle bronc rider Heith DeMoss, a seven-time NFR qualifier from Heflin, La. “You want to go to Pete’s rodeos, because you’re going to get on something good.”

postheadericon Changes are key to rodeo’s future

JACKSONVILLE, Texas – The volunteers that organize this community’s annual rodeo are making all things possible for rodeo fans.

“We’ve had some people who have asked us to do a few different things, so we’re doing that this year,” said Byron Underwood, chairman of the Tops in Texas Rodeo, set for 7 p.m. Thursday, May 19-Saturday, May 21, at Lons Morris College Arena.

PeteCarrsClassicLogo“Right beside the arena, we’re going to have a beer garden and a big screen that will play the rodeo for the people out there, so people can go over there and enjoy their beer and still see the rodeo. But we want to keep it a family atmosphere at the rodeo arena, so we’re going to keep them separate. Admission into the beer garden is with a rodeo ticket, which gets you into the rodeo, then you can go where you want.”

It’s just one of the changes that will be featured during the 54th edition of Jacksonville’s rodeo.

“People have wanted us to have beer for years,” Underwood said. “You can still go to the rodeo, but if you’re not into that, you will never know they have beer out there.

“We’re also going to have a couple concerts coming for the rodeo, so that’s going to be nice.”

That is just part of the overall entertainment value ticket-buyers get at the Tops of Texas Rodeo, which also will feature comedian and rodeo clown Troy Lerwill.

He is one of the most celebrated acts in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. He’s been the barrelman at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo three times, has twice been named the Coors Man in the Can, and he’s been named the PRCA Act of the Year six times. His motorcycle act involves Lerwill’s alter-ego, “The Wild Child,” who jumps a Bloomer trailer and a Ram pickup in a showcase of comedy mixed with athleticism.

The rodeo is produced by Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo, the largest stock contracting firm in the PRCA that brings stock from its ranch near Athens, Texas. Over the last three years, no other stock contractor has had more animals selected to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo than the Carr firm.

“I think what makes our rodeo special is the fact that we’re professional and we use a professional like Pete,” Underwood said. “We have professional cowboys, the professional acts and make it a professional event, like having “The Wild Child” and the different things that come with a PRCA rodeo.

“There aren’t a lot of rodeos that have been going for 54 years.”

It continues to be relevant, to be a fan favorite in the community of more than 14,500 people. A big part of that, Underwood said, is the relationship the rodeo has with Pete Carr, owner of the livestock production company.

“He’s a great businessman, and he has an excellent crew,” he said. “He has the kind of people that run the show, and he’s been wonderful to us. He’s been a great asset to our rodeo.

“His crew knows what they are doing, and we trust him with our rodeo.”

That trust is a big reason the Tops of Texas Rodeo is a big hit for fans and contestants every year.

postheadericon Thomas ready for cowboy experience

CLAREMORE, Okla. – Jim Thomas has never claimed to be a cowboy, but he’s ready to play the part.

Thomas is Claremore’s city manager, and this year he’s received two major honors: He was named the Claremore’s Progressive Person of the Year in the Claremore Progress, then was named to be the grand marshal at this year’s Will Rogers Stampede parade, which takes place at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 28.

“I’ve never been a grand marshal,” said Thomas, who has been at his post for about three and a half years. “It’s kind of humbling. I’m going to wear my cowboy hat and my boots. I’m not a cowboy, but I’m a cowboy at heart. It’s a nice honor, and I appreciate them extending the invitation to me.”

JimThomasThis marks the first time in several years a parade has been part of the rodeo weekend.

“It’s a new tradition that’s coming back,” he said. “David (Petty) and I talked about the whole weekend, and we wanted to make it a big event. This is the 70th year for the Will Rogers Stampede, so we want to make it special.”

Petty is the chairman of the Stampede’s rodeo committee, and there are plenty of reasons to celebrate the event – not only is this the 70th anniversary, but the event also will celebrate its two straight titles for Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association’s Small Rodeo of the Year.

“Having a rodeo to receive that much recognition bodes well for our community pride, just as Rogers State University and the Will Rogers Museum,” Thomas said. “This is another one of those highlights that Claremore can promote.”

The Will Rogers Stampede PRCA Rodeo is set for 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 27-Sunday, May 29, at Will Rogers Stampede Arena. Now an award-winning showcase, the city manager recognizes its value.

“I used to manage a city in Utah right outside of Ogden, which has the Pioneer Days Rodeo every year,” Thomas said. “Alan Hall is the chairman of the Ogden Pioneer Days Rodeo, and he’s a friend of mine. He was in Las Vegas last year when the award was given out, and he sent me a text.

“He’s never been to Claremore, but he knew I was here, and he was excited for us as a community. The rodeo is a direct reflection of this community.”

Tickets are on sale through the event’s website, www.WillRogersStampede.com, and include family packs and adult passes offered at a significant discount online. This year’s event will feature Texas music concerts every night after the performances, with Adam Hood on Friday, Cooder Graw on Saturday and Cody Canada and The Departed to close out Sunday’s show.

While the weekend will close with a bang, the Downtown Hoedown will add the perfect amount of fireworks to kick-start the festivities. The event will take place Thursday, May 26, and will close down Main Street from City Hall to Route 66. It will feature barbecue, live music and some other Western flare.

“We have a lot of visitors from outside the area that come to town for the rodeo,” Thomas said. “We wanted the cowboys and cowgirls feel welcomed. We got together with some of our civic groups and the downtown business association.

“This is one of those brainchildren that the more you talk about it, the more excited everyone gets. Plus a hoedown is an awesome word to use when you’re talking about an activity.”

It all comes together for the perfect celebration of all Claremore has to offer.

“We want to get the community excited that we’ve got a great rodeo right in our back yard,” he said. “The award adds another one of those merits that recognizes this community. It’s a great place to raise families. Rodeos are another one of those quality-of-life things that every community should have.

“I’m very excited we have such a good one here.”

postheadericon Peek lassos Guymon’s all-around

Josh Peek ropes his calf in 8.5 seconds to place in the third go-round. He finished second in the tie-down roping average and won the all-around title at the Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Josh Peek ropes his calf in 8.5 seconds to place in the third go-round. He finished second in the tie-down roping average and won the all-around title at the Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

GUYMON, Okla. – Josh Peek took a bad situation on Sunday and made it considerably better, and that paid off with the all-around championship at the Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo.

“They hadn’t done much on my bulldogging steer, and I just went out and made the best run I could,” said Peek, a six-time Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifier from Pueblo, Colo. “That happens in rodeo.”

He made up for it tie-down roping, roping and tying his calf in 8.5 seconds. He finished in a tie for fourth place in the third round and finished second in the average with a three-run cumulative time of 25.6 seconds. He earned nearly $3,600 on Sunday alone.

That pushed his week-long earnings in the Oklahoma Panhandle to $6,620, and he will now wear the coveted trophy buckle provided to the all-around cowboy.

“I came back on a calf that tried, and I just went out and tried to make a He-Man run,” he said. “I ran him up there a ways. My horse, Rio, really made that run. He stopped hard, pulled the calf over my leg and let me tie him fast a long ways down the arena.”

Peek won the bulk of his money in tie-down roping, where he placed in all three go-rounds. His lone check in steer wrestling was for sharing the first-round with eventual champion Tyler Waguespack of Gonzalez, La.

Saddle bronc rider Roper Kiesner matches moves with Pete Carr Pro Rodeo's Manhatten Moon for 83 points on Sunday (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Saddle bronc rider Roper Kiesner matches moves with Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Manhatten Moon for 83 points on Sunday (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Peek will now tend to some personal things around his Pueblo home before returning to rodeo in June.

“There aren’t a lot of rodeos in the next few weeks, so I’m going to let my horses rest up, really practice and get ready for June,” he said. “It’s the icing on the cake to leave for this little break with a win.”

Though he has NFR experience, it’s been six years since he has played for the largest payday in the game. He would like to return to the finale in both of his disciplines, just like he did in 2007 and 2009.

“Making it to Vegas is extremely important,” Peek said. “It’s been a long-term goal of mine to win an all-around world title and win an individual event title. This year I’ve got some new horses, and I’ve put some time into it.

“I’m putting the pedal to the metal and just going for it.”

That was the same approach taken by Roper Kiesner, a 22-year-old saddle bronc rider from Ripley, Okla. He matched moves with Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Manhatten Moon for 83 points on Sunday afternoon to finish third. He’s hoping that will catapult him to a fourth straight qualification to the RAM Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo.

“Last year was the first time I’d ever ridden in Guymon,” Kiesner said. “I didn’t do very well, so it was a little disappointing. This year I had a really good horse. He helped me make a great ride.”

He earned $1,990 in Guymon, and that money will go a long ways to moving him up higher in the standings. Returning to Duncan, Okla., in October is important for the young cowboy. Qualifiers earn their way to the regional finale by finishing the regular season with enough money earned at rodeos primarily in Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska.

“It’s always been a dream of mine, and this year the money we win at the circuit finals will count toward the world standings,” Kiesner said. “I know everybody’s going to try to win the circuit because of that.”

Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo
May 2-8
All-around cowboy:
Josh Peek, $6,620 won in steer wrestling and tie-down roping

Bareback riding: 1. Jake Brown, 89 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Scarlet’s Web, $3,257; 2. Tranner Aus, 85, $2,497; 3. Orin Larsen, 84.5, $1,846; 4. Frank Morton, 82.5, $1,194; 5. Devan Reilly, 82, $760; 6. Tyler Scales, 81, $543; 7. Ty Breuer, 81, $434; Caine Riddle, 80, $326..

Team roping: First round: 1. Tyler Wade/Dakota Kirchenschlager, 5.4 seconds, $1,975; 2. David Key/Travis Woodard, 6.1, $1,717; 3. Coleman Proctor/Billie Jack Saebens, 6.6, $1,460; 4. Clay Ullery/Ryon Tittel, 6.7, $1,202; 5. Monty Wood/Brandon Gonzales, 6.8, $944; 6. Matt Sherwood/Quinn Kesler, 6.9, $687; 7. Blake Hughes/Brady Norman, 7.0, $429; 8. (tie) Lane Livy/Braden Harmon, Paul David Tierney/Cesar de la Cruz and Adam Rose/Walt Woodard, 7.1, $57 each. Second round: 1. (tie) Ryan Jarrett/Marty Yates and Cory Clark/Levi Lord, 5.1 seconds, $1,846 each; 3. Cody Heflin/Ben Hogan, 5.8, $1,460; 4. (tie) Garrett Tonozzi/Cullen Teller and BJ.B. James Jr./Brock Hanson, 6.4, $1,073 each; 6. Clayton Hass/Cody Doescher, 6.5, $687; 7. Miles Baker/Jace Crabb, 6.8, $429; 8. (tie) Adam Rose/Walt Woodard, Aaron Macy/Cody Pierson and Tyler Wojciechowski/Jace Davis, 7.1, $57 each. Third round: 1. Blake Hughes/Brady Norman, 6.7 seconds, $1,975; 2. Logan Olson/Gage Williams, 7.0, $1,717; 3. JoJo LeMond/Kory Koontz, 7.1, $1,460; 4. Clay Ullery/Ryon Tittel, 7.2, $1,202; 5. (tie) Lee Hagler/T.W. Willson and Adam Rose/Walt Woodard, 7.3, $816 each; 7. Jason Thorstenson/Paul Griemsman, 7.6,$429; 8. (tie) Caleb Mitchell/Cody Thornton and Clayton Hass/Cody Doescher, 7.9, $86 each. Aggregate: 1. Adam Rose/Walt Woodard, 21.5 seconds on three runs, $2,962; 2. Clayton Hass/Cody Doescher, 22.8, $2,576; 3. Monty Wood/Brandon Gonzales, 23.4, $2,189; 4. Aaron Macy/Cody Pearson, 23.8, $1,803; 5 (tie) Jason Thorstenson/Paul Griemsman and J.B. James Jr./Brock Hanson, 24.1, $1,223 each; 7. Miles Baker/Jace Crabb, 24.7, $644; 8. Blaine Vick/Jim Ross Cooper, 25.6, $258.

Steer wrestling: First round: 1. (tie) Josh Peek and Tyler Waguespack, 3.7 seconds, $1,671 each; 3. (tie) Matt Reeves and Jacob Talley, 4.1, $1,204 each; 5. (tie) Tooter Silver and Logan Gledhill, 4.2, $738 each; 7. (tie) Royce Johnson, Clayton Hass and Cody Doescher, 4.3, $181 each. Second round: 1. (tie) Tom Lewis and Gary Gilbert, 3.8 seconds, $1,671 each; 3. Tyler Waguespack, 3.9, $1,321; 4. Wade Steffen, 4.1, $1,088; 5. (tie) Ryan Botham, Taton Sterkel, Josh Clark and J.D. Struxness, 4.3, $505 each. Third round: 1. Dean Gorsuch, 3.9 seconds, $1,787; 2. Jacob Talley, 4.0, $1,554; 3. Trell Etbauer, 4.1, $1,321; 4. (tie) Nick Guy, J.D. Struxness and Tanner Bruner, 4.2, $855 each; 7. Clayton Hass, 4.3, $389; 8. Jason Thomas, 4.4, $155. Aggregate: 1. Tyler Waguespack, 12.1 seconds on three runs, $2,681; 2. J.D. Struxness, 13.1, $2,331; 3. Clayton Hass, 14.2, $1,982; 4. Cody Doescher, 14.4, $1,632; 5. Dean Gorsuch 14.8, $1,282; 6. Tanner Bruner, 14.9, $932; 7. Nick Guy, 15.0, $583; 8. Jacob Talley, 15.3, $233.

Saddle bronc riding: 1. (tie) Allen Boore, on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Gold Coast, and Ryder Wright, on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Cool Runnings, 83.5 points, $3,101 each; 3. Roper Kiesner, 83, $1,990; 4. Chuck Schmidt, 82, $1,287; 4. (tie) Clay Elliott and Audy Reed, 80.5, $702 each; 6. Zeke Thurston, 80, $468; 7. (tie) Nat Stratton and Taygen Schuelke, 79.5, $176.

Tie-down roping: First round: 1. Cade Swor, 7.6 seconds, $1,946; 2. (tie) Sterling Smith and Adam Gray, 8.0, $1,565 each; 4. Caddo Lewallen, 8.2, $1,184; 5. Clint Cooper, 8.3, $931; 6. Ryan Jarrett, 8.5, $677; 7. (tie) Josh Peek and Rees Reimer, 8.6, $296 each. Second round: 1. Ace Slone, 7.7 seconds, $1,946; 2. Cade Swor, 8.0, $1,692; 3. Michael Otero, 8.1, $1,438; 4. (tie) Marty Yates and Josh Peek, 8.5, $1,058 each; 6. Ethan Hill, 8.6, $677; 7. (tie) Blane Cox and E.J. Roberts, 8.7, $296 each. Third round: 1. Tyson Durfey, 7.6 seconds, $1,946; 2. Randall Carlisle, 7.8, $1,692; 3. Trent Creager, 7.9, $1,438; 4. (tie) Cory Solomon and Josh Peek, 8.5, $1,058 each; 6. Robert Mathis, 8.8, $677; 7. Chris Demases, 8.9, $423; 8. L.D. Meier, 9.2, $169. Aggregate: 1. Cade Swor, 25.2 seconds on three runs, $2,919; 2. Josh Peek, 25.6, $2,538; 3. Ace Slone, 27.4, $2,157; 4. Randall Carlisle, 28.1, $1,777; 5. Trent Creager, 28.8, $1,396; 6. Chris Demases, 28.9, $1,015; 7. (tie) L.D. Meier and Tye Thompson, 29.1,$444.

Barrel racing: First round: 1. Cayla Melby, 17.14 seconds, $1,958; 2. Taylor Langdon, 17.29, $1,679; 3. Cassidy Kruse, 17.35, $1,399; 4. Nicole Laurence, 17.36, $1,213; 5. Kellie Collier, 17.43, $933; 6. Stevi Hillman, 17.44, $746;. 7. (tie) Pamela Capper and Ivy Conrado, 17.48, $466 each; 9. (tie) Kelley Schnaufer and Mary Burger, 17.50, $233 each. Second round: 1. Michele McLeod, 17.19 seconds, $1,959; 2. Tori Morris, 17.36, $1,679; 3. Abby Penson, 17.39, $1,399; 4. Taylor Langdon, 17.43, $1,213; 5. Carley Richardson, 17.45, $933; 6. Kellie Collier, 17.46, $746; 7. (tie) Kaylee Burnett and Sabrina Ketcham, 17.48, $466 each; 9. Amy Jo Farella, 17.50, $280; Ari-Anna Flynn, 17.56, $187. Aggregate: 1. Michele McLeod, 34.71, $1,959; 2. Taylor Langdon, 34.72, $1,679; 3. Kellie Collier, 34.89, $1,399; 4. Nicole Laurence, 35.02, $1,213; 5. Mary Burger, 35.03, $933; 6. Cassidy Kruse, 35.05, $746; 7. (tie) Carley Richardson and Jane Griemsman, 35.11, $466 each; 9. Tori Morris, 35.17, $280; 10. Cayla Melby, 35.18, $187.

Bull riding: 1. Scottie Knapp, 87 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Ratter, $3,835; 2. Tyler Smith, 86.5, $2,940; 3. Justin Hendrix, 85.5, $2,173; 4. Tanner Learmont, 85, $1,406; 5. Dalan Duncan, 84.5, $895; 6. (tie) Clay Wagner and Eli Vastbinder, 81, $575 each; 8. (tie) Tyler Taylor and Dallee Mason, 80.5, $192 each.

Steer roping: First round: 1. Will Gasperson, 12.6 seconds, $1,697; 2. Scott Snedecor, 13.6, $1,476; 3. Guy Allen, 13.7, $1,254; 4. Dan Fisher, 14.4, $1,033; 5. Vin Fisher Jr., 14.5, $812; 6. Jarrett Blessing, 14.7, $590; 7. Marty Jones, 14.8, $369; 8. JoJo LeMond, 15.0, $148. Second round: 1. K.W. Lauer, 12.4 seconds, $1,697; 2. Don Eddleman, 12.6, $1,476; 3. (tie) Marty Jones and Billy Good, 13.2, $1,144 each; 5. Scott Snedecor, 13.4, $812; 6. (tie) Jess Tierney and John Bland, 13.5, $480 each; 8. JoJo LeMond, 13.9, $148. Third round: 1. Troy Tillard, 10.7 seconds, $1,697; 2. Jason Evans, 11.0, $1,476; 3. Jess Tierney, 11.1, $1,254; 4. Rocky Patterson, 11.2, $1,033; 5. Corey Ross, 11.4, $812; 6. Dan Eddleman, 11.8, $590; 7. J.P. Wickett, 12.1, $396; 8. Brodie Poppino, 12.2, $148. Fourth round: 1. Lawson Plemons, 10.0 seconds, $1,697; 2. Tom Smith, 10.6, $1,476; 3. Brian Garr, 10.7, $1,254; 4. (tie) Ty Herd and Brodie Poppino, 11.0, $922 each; 6. JoJo LeMond, 10.6, $590; 6. Jarrett Blessing, 10.7, $369; 8. Brent Lewis, 11.9, $148. Average: 1. JoJo LeMond, 54.4 seconds on four runs, $3,394; 2. Scott Snedecor, 60.5, $2,952; 3. Jarrett Blessing, 60.6, $2,509; 4. (tie) Vin Fisher Jr. and Rocky Patterson, 62.0, $1,845 each; 6. Jim Locke, 62.4, $1,181; 7. Jason Evans, 63.1, $738; 8. Tony Reina, 71.0, $295.

postheadericon Elliott, Reed show off at ‘home’

Clay Elliott of Nanton, Alberta, rides Korkow Rodeo's Rekker for 80.5 points and sits in a tie for fourth place with his traveling partner, Audy Reed of Spearman, Texas. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Clay Elliott of Nanton, Alberta, rides Korkow Rodeo’s Fraid Knot for 80.5 points and sits in a tie for fourth place with his traveling partner, Audy Reed of Spearman, Texas. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

GUYMON, Okla. – They come from separate parts of North America, but Audy Reed and Clay Elliott have traveled a similar path.

Both have been part of the storied rodeo program at Oklahoma Panhandle State University in nearby Goodwell, and now they’re traveling the ProRodeo circuit together riding saddle broncs. On Saturday night, the two cowboys put together identical 80.5 scores during the third performance of the Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo.

Clay Elliott of Nanton, Alberta, rides Korkow Rodeo's Rekker for 80.5 points and sits in a tie for fourth place with his traveling partner, Audy Reed of Spearman, Texas. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Audy Reed of Spearman, Texas, rides Korkow Rodeo’s Rekker for 80.5 points and sits in a tie for fourth place with his traveling partner, Audy Reed of Spearman, Texas. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

“This is kind of like our hometown rodeo, so it’s good to see people you know and have them watch you do good,” said Reed, who leads the Resistol Saddle Bronc Riding Rookie of the Year race and resides in Spearman, Texas, just 50 miles southeast of Guymon. “It’s always nice to win some money to help you keep going.”

They are tied for fourth place and will have to hold out through Sunday’s final performance to see how they finish, but performing well inside Henry C. Hitch Pioneer Arena is important for both cowboys.

“I’ve got all my family here and my teachers and friends,” said Elliott, the 11th-ranked bronc rider in the world standings from Nanton, Alberta. “It’s especially nice to have my teachers here. I have a really good relationship with them, and to keep that relationship good is important to me. I’m glad to have them see what I’m able to do.”

Both cowboys made their way to Goodwell because of the rodeo program, which oftentimes is referred to as Bronc Rider University because of the top talent in the discipline that has attended school there and been part of the rodeo program. In all, five Panhandle State rodeo alumni have earned world championships in bronc riding alone.

“I came down here because of bronc riding, for sure,” Elliott said. “I knew the school was good, but I knew the bronc riding was the best. When I got here, I realized that the teachers were just as good as the bronc riding. It’s a damn good deal for me.”

That education is key for two men who hope to make their living in rodeo, one bronc at a time.

“Growing up on a ranch sure help, but those people over there are probably the best teachers in the world as far as bronc riding is concerned,” Reed said, referring to rodeo coach Robert Etbauer, a two-time world champion, and other Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifiers who have helped with the program over the years.

Having solid performances at Pioneer Days Rodeo is especially appealing to both cowboys.

“Audy and I are going to a lot of rodeos this year,” Elliott said. “We try to treat this one the same as the other rodeos, but it still means a little more.”

They proved that Saturday night.

Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo
May 2-8
Results through the first performance
Bareback riding leaders: 1. Jake Brown, 89 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Scarlet’s Web; 2. Tranner Aus, 85; 3. Orin Larsen, 84.5; 4. Frank Morton, 82.5; 5. Devan Reilly, 82; 6.Ty Breuer, 81; 7. Casey Breuer, 79.5; 8. Kelly Timberman, 77.

Team roping: Third round leaders: 1. Blake Hughes/Brady Norman, 6.7 seconds; 2. Logan Olson/Gage Williams, 7.0; 3. JoJo LeMond/Kory Koontz, 7.1; 4. Clay Ullery/Ryon Tittel, 7.2; 5. Lee Hagler, 7.3; 6. (tie) Caleb Mitchell/Cody Thornton and Clayton Hass/Cody Doescher, 7.9; 8. Blaine Vick/Jim Ross Cooper, 8.1. Aggregate leaders: 1. Clayton Hass/Cody Doescher, 22.8 seconds on three runs; 2. Monty Wood/Brandon Gonzales, 23.4; 3. Blaine Vick/Jim Ross Cooper, 25.6; 4. Clay Ullery/Ryon Tittle, 25.7; 5. Logan Olson/Gage Williams, 27.0; 6. Caleb Mitchell/Cody Thornton, 27.4; 7. Garrett Tonozzi/Cullen Teller, 29.2; 8. Joel Bach/Jake Smith, 29.7.

Steer wrestling: Third round leaders: 1. Dean Gorsuch, 3.9 seconds; 2. Jacob Talley, 4.0; 3. Trell Etbauer, 4.1; 4. (tie) Nick Guy and Tanner Bruner, 4.2; 6. Clayton Hass, 4.3; 7. Jason Thomas, 4.4; 8. (tie) Seth Brockman and Tyler Waguespack, 4.5. Aggregate leaders: 1. Tyler Waguespack, 12.1 seconds on three runs; 2. Clayton Hass, 14.2; 3. Cody Doescher, 14.4; 4. Dean Gorsuch 14.8; 5. Tanner Bruner, 14.9; 6. Nick Guy, 15.0; 7. Jacob Talley, 15.3; 8. Jake Kraupie, 15.6.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. (tie) Allen Boore, on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Gold Coast, and Ryder Wright, on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Cool Runnings, 83.5 points; 3. Chuck Schmidt, 82; 4. (tie) Clay Elliott and Audy Reed, 80.5; 6. Zeke Thurston, 80; 7. (tie) Nat Stratton and Taygen Schuelke, 79.5.

Tie-down roping: Third round leaders: 1. Tyson Durfey, 7.6 seconds; 2. Randall Carlisle, 7.8; 3. Cory Solomon, 8.5; 4. Robert Mathis, 8.8; 5. Chris Demases, 8.9; 6. L.D. Meier, 9.2; 7. Ace Slone, 9.4; 8. Cade Swor, 9.6. Aggregate leaders: 1. Cade Swor, 25.2 seconds on three runs; 2. Ace Slone, 27.4; 3. Randall Carlisle, 28.1; 4. Chris Demases, 28.9; 5. L.D. Meier, 29.1; 6. Tyson Durfey, 29.7; 7. Scott Kormos, 30.4; 8. Robert Mathis, 31.0.

Barrel racing: Second round leaders: 1. Michele McLeod, 17.19; 2. Tori Morris, 17.36 seconds; 3. Abby Penson, 17.39; 4. Taylor Langdon, 17.43; 5. Carley Richardson, 17.45; 6. Kellie Collier, 17.,46; 7. (tie) Kaylee Burnett and Sabrina Ketcham, 17.48; 9. Amy Jo Farella, 17.50; Ari-Anna Flynn, 17.56. Aggregate leaders: 1. Michele McLeod, 34.71; 2. Taylor Langdon, 34.72; Kellie Collier, 34.89; 4. Nicole Laurence, 35.02; 5. Carley Richaradson, 35.11; 6. Tori Morris, 35.17; 7. Rylee Dick, 35.24; 8. Ari-Anna Flynn, 35.28; 9. Laura Kennedy, 35.32; 10. Amy Jo Farella, 35.36.

Bull riding leaders: 1. Scottie Knapp, 87 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Ratter; 2. Tyler Smith, 86.5; 3. Justin Hendrix, 85.5; 4. Tanner Learmont, 85; 5. (tie) Clay Wagner and Eli Vastbinder, 81; 7. Tyler Taylor, 80.5; 8. Corey Atwell, 80.

postheadericon Waguespack finds his comfort zone

Tyler Waguespack makes a solid run to finish in 4.5 seconds in his third-round run in Guymon. He leads the average with a two-run cumulative time of 12.1 seconds. His hazer on this run, Clayton Hass, sits second in the average. They both bulldog on Cadillac, the 2014 PRCA/AQHA Steer Wrestling Horse of the Year. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Tyler Waguespack makes a solid run to finish in 4.5 seconds in his third-round run in Guymon. He leads the average with a two-run cumulative time of 12.1 seconds. His hazer on this run, Clayton Hass, sits second in the average. They both bulldog on Cadillac, the 2014 PRCA/AQHA Steer Wrestling Horse of the Year. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

GUYMON, Okla. – For all the limited success Tyler Waguespack has had at the Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo, he’s never finished things off.

“I’ve done well in a round here just about every year I’ve been here, but I’ve never been able to get in the average,” said Waguespack, a 2015 Wrangler National Finals steer wrestling qualifier from Gonzalez, La.

Tyler Waguespack

Tyler Waguespack

That changed during this year’s 84th annual rodeo. After competing in the opening two rounds Wednesday and Thursday, he held the lead heading into the third go-round. He extended that lead during Saturday afternoon’s second performance with a solid 4.5-second run.

“I had two great runs on my first two cattle, and I came in (to the third round) with the fastest time on two head,” Waguespack said. “I drew a pretty decent steer. Dean Gorsuch had run him earlier in the week, and he gave me some information on him and helped me out; he helped me make the run I did today.”

That run pushed his three-run cumulative time to 12.1 seconds, and he holds a lead of more than two seconds over the runner-up, Clayton Hass of Terrell, Texas. Riding Cadillac, the reigning PRCA/AQHA Steer Wrestling Horse of the Year, both men have been exceptional in the Oklahoma Panhandle this week.

“I’m traveling with Clayton Hass and Ty Erickson this year,” he said, noting that all three cowboys have been to the NFR, with Hass and Erickson earning their second straight qualifications in 2015. “We’ve all been there before, and we’re going to try to get back there again this year.”

They are well on their way. All three cowboys sit among the top five in the world standings, with Waguespack leading the way at No. 2.

“Everybody wants to have a gold buckle,” he said of the elusive world championship. “But 20 years from now I want them to remember my name.”

He’s making it hard to forget.

Scottie Knapp

Scottie Knapp

Waguespack wasn’t the only contestant to move into the overall lead in his event. He was joined by barrel racer Nicole Laurence of Cresson, Texas, and bull rider Scottie Knapp of Albuquerque, N.M. Laurence has a two-run cumulative time of 35.02 seconds and is 15-100ths of a second faster than the No. 2 cowgirl, Tori Morris.

Knapp had a battle on his hands with Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Rattler, a powerful red bull that has been selected to buck at the NFR three straight times. The end result Saturday afternoon was an 87-point ride.

“I felt out of control the whole time,” Knapp said. “I’m not sure if it was the way he was bucking or my form may have been a little off. Once I got out of position, I just let everything hang out and tried to make the whistle. I wasn’t letting go.

“He’s a great bull, and he’s been a great bull for a while. I wouldn’t mind having him again.”

That’s proving to be a winning formula.

Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo
May 2-8
Results through the first performance
Bareback riding leaders: 1. Jake Brown, 89 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Scarlet’s Web; 2. Tranner Aus, 85; 3. Devan Reilly, 82; 4.Ty Breuer, 81; 5. Casey Breuer, 79.5; 6. Kelly Timberman, 77; 7. Casey Colletti, 75; 8. Blaine Kaufman, 74.

Team roping: Third round leaders: 1. Blake Hughes/Brady Norman, 6.7 seconds; 2. JoJo LeMond/Kory Koontz, 7.1; 3. (tie) Caleb Mitchell/Cody Thornton and Clayton Hass/Cody Doescher, 7.9; 5. Joshua Torres/Jonathan Torres, 8.6; 6. Monty Wood/Brandon Gonzales, 8.7; 7. Jacob Dagenhart/Caleb Anderson, 13.3; 8. Will Clark/Tanner Ward, 14.1. Aggregate leaders: 1. Clayton Hass/Cody Doescher, 22.8 seconds on three runs; 2. Monty Wood/Brandon Gonzales, 23.4; 3. Caleb Mitchell/Cody Thornton, 27.4; 4. (tie) Blake Hughes/Brady Norman and Joshua Torres/Jonathan Torres, 31.1; 6. JoJo LeMond/Kory Koontz, 32.3; 7. Will Clark/Tanner Ward, 35.5; 8. Paul David Tierney/Cesar de la Cruz, 36.2.

Steer wrestling: Third round leaders: 1. Dean Gorsuch, 3.9 seconds; 2. Jacob Talley, 4.0; 3. Nick Guy, 4.2; 4. Clayton Hass, 4.3; 5. Jason Thomas, 4.4; 6. (tie) Seth Brockman and Tyler Waguespack, 4.5; 8. Jake Kraupie, 4.9. Aggregate leaders: 1. Tyler Waguespack, 12.1 seconds on three runs; 2. Clayton Hass, 14.2; 3. Cody Doescher, 14.4; 4. Dean Gorsuch 14.8; 5. Nick Guy, 15.0; 6. Jacob Talley, 15.3; 7. Jake Kraupie, 15.6; 8. Seth Brockman, 16.3.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. (tie) Allen Boore, on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Gold Coast, and Ryder Wright, on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Cool Runnings, 83.5 points; 3. Chuck Schmidt, 82; 4. Zeke Thurston, 80; 5. Brady Nicholes, 79; 6. Tyrel Larsen, 78.5; 7. Preston Burr, 77.5; 8. Spencer Wright, 75; 6. Shade Etbauer, 74; 7. Charlie Kogaines, 73; 8. Brody Cress, 70.

Tie-down roping: Third round leaders: 1. Tyson Durfey, 7.6 seconds; 2. Cory Solomon, 8.5; 3. Robert Mathis, 8.8; 4. Cade Swor, 9.6; 5. Blane Cox, 10.2; 6. (tie) Clint Cooper and Marty Yates, 10.4; 8. (tie) Dalton Dunham and Jake Pratt, 11.4. Aggregate leaders: 1. Cade Swor, 25.2 seconds on three runs; 2. Tyson Durfey, 29.7; 3. Robert Mathis, 31.0; 4. Blane Cox, 31.2; 5. Cory Solomon, 32.6; 6. Clint Cooper, 33.1; 7. Adam Gray, 36.7; 8. Marty Yates, 37.2.

Barrel racing: Second round leaders: 1. Tori Morris, 17.36 seconds; 2. Abby Penson, 17.39; 3. (tie) Kaylee Burnett and Sabrina Ketcham, 17.48; 5. Amy Jo Farella, 17.50; 6. (tie) Tiany Schuster and Laura Kennedy, 17.57; 8. Cranna Roberts, 17.58; 9. (tie) Morgan Breaux and Tassie Munroe, 17.59. Aggregate leaders: 1. Nicole Laurence, 35.02 seconds on two runs; 2. Tori Morris, 35.17; 3. Rylee Dick, 35.24; 4. Laura Kennedy, 35.32; 5. Amy Jo Farella, 35.36; 6. Sabrina Ketcham, 35.28; 7. Tassie Munroe, 35.44; 8. Morgan Breaux, 35.47; 9. Shelby Vinson, 35.65; 10. Teresa Tubeville, 35.66.

Bull riding leaders: 1. Scottie Knapp, 87 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Ratter; 2. Tanner Learmont, 85; 3. (tie) Clay Wagner and Eli Vastbinder, 81; 5. Corey Atwell, 80; 6. Freeman Yoder, 74; 7. Markus Mariluch, 71; no other qualified rides.

postheadericon Young bull rider injured in Guymon

GUYMON, Okla. – Clay Wagner got to see the good and bad in the Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo during Friday’s first performance.

Guymon Pioneer Days Logo-100Wagner, an 18-year-old bull rider from Round Rock, Ariz., rode the Lancaster & Jones bull Mongol for 81 points and took the early lead. But just as soon as the ride ended, Wagner head collided with the bull’s head.

The nasty spill resulted in a concussion and a fractured cervical vertebrae, but Wagner still had movement and passed the neurological exam, said Rick Foster, the program director for the Justin Sportsmedicine Team.

Wagner was treated at Memorial Hospital of Texas County, then transferred to OU Medical Center in Oklahoma City for a follow-up exam with a neck specialist, Foster said.

postheadericon LeMond chasing all-around gold

JoJo LeMond of Andrews, Texas, finishes off his team-roping run Friday with heeler Kory Koontz of Sudan, Texas. The tandem leads the third go-round, and LeMond put himself in position to earn this year's all-around title at the Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo. (PHOTO BY JAMES PHIFER)

JoJo LeMond of Andrews, Texas, finishes off his team-roping run Friday with heeler Kory Koontz of Sudan, Texas. The tandem leads the third go-round, and LeMond put himself in position to earn this year’s all-around title at the Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo. (PHOTO BY JAMES PHIFER)

GUYMON, Okla. – The 2015 ProRodeo season was a bit of a dream for JoJo LeMond.

He earned his second straight qualification to the Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping, then moved in as an injury replacement for Jake Barnes at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. In all, he finished sixth in steer roping and seventh in heading; most importantly, he was the reserve world champion all-around cowboy.

JoJo LeMond

JoJo LeMond

“I would love to go back to both of them,” said LeMond, who has competed four times at the NFR over his career. “I’m really going to try to win the all-around world championship.”

He’s on his way to earning that same title at the Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo. Earlier this week, he earned the steer roping title to pocket $4,280. That gave him a head start on the rest of the cowboys who compete in multiple events.

On Friday night during the first of four performances, LeMond and heeler Kory Koontz of Sudan, Texas, posted the fastest team roping time with a 7.1-second run. That presents the opportunity to earn money in the third go-round, adding to LeMond’s Pioneer Days earnings.

“It would mean a lot to win the all-around here,” he said. “Anytime you can win the all-around at something like this or Cheyenne (Wyo.) or Salinas (Calif.) – somewhere that it’s a cowboy event – that’s great. You’ve got to be mounted well.

“Plus this is a really prestigious rodeo.”

He finished the 2015 season 16th in the heading standings. When Barnes was injured a week before the first round of the NFR, LeMond was called in to head for Barnes’ partner, Junior Nogueira. The two then put on quite a show in Las Vegas, earning more than $117,000 in 10 days. Now he’s roping with Kootz, who has 20 NFR qualifications under his belt.

“It’s a huge blessing to get to rope with him,” LeMond said of Koontz. “He’s been a hero of mine since I was a kid. It’s just a real honor.”

Being a kid would be a great way to describe saddle bronc rider Ryder Wright, the second son to two-time world champion Cody Wright of Milford, Utah. He turned 18 years old less than two months ago, began competing on his permit. Within a few weeks, he had earned enough money (at least $1,000) to be a full-fledged member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association.

On Friday night, he matched moves with Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Cool Runnings for 83.5 points, sharing the lead with Allen Boore of Axtell, Utah.

“I didn’t know anything about that horse, but (brother) Rusty, (uncle) Spencer and Dad all said he was good,” said Wright, who has been to every NFR since 2003 to watch his family compete; last year, the field of talented Wright bronc riders included Rusty, who made the NFR at age 20 and finished third in the final world standings.

Cody Wright won his world titles in 2008 and 2010; Spencer Wright earned the gold buckle in 2014; and  another uncle, Jesse Wright, is the 2012 titlist. While it’s a bronc riding family, that wasn’t always the case for Ryder.

“My sixth-grade year, we started doing junior high rodeo,” Ryder Wright said. “I was just riding bulls; I was too scared to ride broncs. In the summer of my eighth-grade year, I got on a couple steers in the bronc saddle; that’s where I started. I did that for a few months, then I got on my first horse, and it’s been going good since then. I love it.”

It shows. It was also the Wright decision for him.

Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo
May 2-8
Results through the first performance
Bareback riding leaders: 1. Jake Brown, 89 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Scarlet’s Web; 2. Tranner Aus, 85; 3. Ty Breuer, 81; 4. Casey Breuer, 79.5; 5. Casey Colletti, 75; 6. Blaine Kaufman, 74.

Team roping: Third round leaders: 1. JoJo LeMond/Kory Koontz, 7.1 seconds; 2. (tie) Caleb Mitchell/Cody Thornton and Clayton Hass/Cody Doescher, 7.9; 4. Monty Wood/Brandon Gonzales, 8.7; 5. Jacob Dagenhart/Caleb Anderson, 13.3; no other qualified times. Aggregate leaders: 1. Clayton Hass/Cody Doescher, 22.8 seconds on three runs; 2. Monty Wood/Brandon Gonzales, 23.4; 3. Caleb Mitchell/Cody Thornton, 27.4; 4. JoJo LeMond/Kory Koontz, 32.3; 5. Jacob Dagenhart/Caleb Anderson, 45.1; 6. David Key/Travis Woodard, 13.8 seconds on two runs; 7. (tie) Adam Rose/Walt Woodard, 14.2.

Steer wrestling: Third round leaders: 1. Jacob Talley, 4.0 seconds; 2. Nick Guy, 4.2; 3. Seth Brockman, 4.5; 4. Jace Melvin, 5.0; 5. (tie) Sean Santucci and Cody Doescher, 5.2; 7. Tooter Silver, 8.8; 8. Jake Fulton, 13.8. Aggregate leaders: 1. Cody Doescher, 14.4 seconds on three runs; 2. Nick Guy, 15.0; 3. Jacob Talley, 15.3; 4. Seth Brockman, 16.3; 5. Sean Santucci, 17.9; 6. Tooter Silver, 18.6; 7. Jace Melvin, 21.9; 8. Jake Fulton, 23.4.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. (tie) Allen Boore, on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Gold Coast, and Ryder Wright, on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Cool Runnings, 83.5 points; 3. Brady Nicholes, 79; 4. Preston Burr, 77.5; 5. Spencer Wright, 75; 6. Shade Etbauer, 74; 7. Charlie Kogaines, 73; 8. Brody Cress, 70.

Tie-down roping: Third round leaders: 1. Cory Solomon, 8.5 seconds; 2. Robert Mathis, 8.8; 3. Cade Swor, 9.6; 4. Clint Cooper, 10.4; 5. (tie) Dalton Dunham and Jake Pratt, 11.4; 7. Shane Hanchey, 15.1; no other qualified times. Aggregate leaders: 1. Cade Swor, 25.2 seconds on three runs; 2. Robert Mathis, 31.0; 3. Cory Solomon, 32.6; 4. Clint Cooper, 33.1; 5. Jake Pratt, 40.6; 6. Dalton Dunham, 43.9; 7. Shane Hanchey, 45.4; 8. Sterling Smith, 17.0 seconds on two runs.,

Barrel racing: Second round leaders: 1. Tori Morris, 17.36 seconds; 2. Sabrina Ketcham, 17.48; 3. Amy Jo Farella, 17.50; 4. Laura Kennedy, 17.57; 5. (tie) Morgan Breaux and Tassie Munroe, 17.59; 7. Teresa Turbeville, 17.80; 8. Becky Larson, 17.93; 9. Julie Burnett, 18.16; 10. Sara Bynum 22.76. Aggregate leaders: 1. Tori Morris, 35.17 seconds on two runs; 2 Laura Kennedy, 35.32; 3. Amy Jo Farella, 35.36; 4. Sabrina Ketcham, 35.28; 5. Tassie Munroe, 35.44; 6. Morgan Breaux, 35.47; 7. Katti Waters, 35.62; 8. Teresa Turbeville, 35.66; 9. Crana Roberts, 35.68; 10. Carollan Scott, 35.71.

Bull riding leaders: 1. Clay Wagner, 81 points on Lancaster & Jones’ Mongol; 2. Corey Atwell, 80; no other qualified rides.

postheadericon Melby wins first round in Guymon

Guymon Pioneer Days Logo-100Cayla Melby, the daughter of NFR qualifier Jane Melby, rounded the cloverleaf pattern at Guymon, Okla., in 17.14 seconds to win the first round. She was 15-100ths of a second ahead of the second-place finisher, Taylor Langdon.

Barrel racing: First round: 1. Cayla Melby, 17.14 seconds, $1,958; 2. Taylor Langdon, 17.29, $1,679; 3. Cassidy Kruse, 17.35, $1,399; 4. Nicole Laurence, 17.36, $1,213; 5. Kellie Collier, 17.43, $933; 6. Stevi Hillman, 17.44, $746;. 7. (tie) Pamela Capper and Ivy Conrado, 17.48, $466 each; 9. (tie) Kelley Schnaufer and Mary Burger, 17.50, $233 each.