postheadericon Carr animals ready for the RNCFR

The Ram National Circuit Finals Rodeo is the perfect test for the top regional cowboys from all across the country.

PeteCarrsClassicLogoThose hoping for the elusive national title know they’ll have to match themselves against some of the best bucking stock in the game, and a good portion of those will come from Pete Carr Pro Rodeo.

The Texas-based stock contractor will feature 36 animals at the RNCFR, set for Wednesday-Saturday in Kissimmee, Fla. That is the largest contingent of animal athletes from all the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association stock contractors in Florida.

The list of Carr animals includes a big number that have bucked at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, including bulls Medicine Show, Footloose, Cajun Smurf, Line Man and Mind Games; saddle broncs Cool Runnings, Mike & Ike, Empty Pockets, Lone Star, Gold Coast, Spur Strap and Lori Darling; and bareback horses Ragin Angel, Witchy Woman, Ladies Man, Utopia, Yo Yo, Night Bells, Alberta Child, Big Lights and Real Deal, a former Bareback Horse of the Year.

With that kind of firepower, it’s bound to be an explosive race to the national championship.

postheadericon Harrison’s talent is part of rodeo

NACOGDOCHES, Texas – Pete Carr is always on the lookout for the brightest talent in Pro Rodeo.

As owner of Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo, Carr knows the key to his business is to provide a great competition and incredible entertainment, all wrapped into a nice package that is rodeo. Whether it’s an athletic horse, a bucking and spinning bull or a great act, the purpose is to bring the best before the fans.

PeteCarrsClassicLogoThat’s the philosophy that will go into the Nacogdoches Pro Rodeo & Steer Show, set for 7:45 p.m. Thursday, March 26-Saturday, March 28, at the Nacogdoches County Arena.

“All anyone wants is a chance to win, and the fans are there to be entertained” Carr said. “I get a lot of feedback from our contestants and fans about the stock and that they really enjoy the clowns and specialty acts that we are able to secure for our events across the country. We try to rotate the top people in the business to keep it fresh and at a level the fans have come to expect and enjoy. ”

Enter John Harrison of Soper, Okla. In 2013, he was selected to work the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo as the barrelman. Last season, he was recognized as the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association’s Comedy Act of the Year and the Coors Man in the Can, an honor that rewards the top clown in the association each year.

In addition to hysterical acts that showcase Harrison’s talent and athleticism, the Oklahoma man serves as a valuable piece of the puzzle that helps make for a near-flawless performance each time he speaks.

“John is a true professional. He is good, clean family fun,” said John Gwatney, the production supervisor for Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo, the livestock producer for the rodeo. “It’s his rodeo background, because he grew up in this sport. He has perfect timing and helps us with the ebb and flow of a rodeo performance. He has a tremendous amount of talent and versatility that translates into a vital piece of the puzzle for a successful event.”

That’s the key to reaching fans with a variety of entertaining items. Whether it’s a trick riding display that will leave fans in awe or his parody of rodeo queens, Harrison has a lot of ammunition in his bag.

“I do this for the love of the sport,” he said “Growing up with it, you enjoy it. Now I can actually make a living at it, so that helps.”

While family is a big part of who Harrison is, he realizes that rodeo serves as a foster family of sorts.

“The friends and the ‘family’ you meet on the road is a big deal for us,” he said. “Plus if it wasn’t fun, I wouldn’t do it.”

postheadericon Cooper rides with Tate Branch team

Roy Cooper poses with his wrapped Tate Branch Auto Group pickup he will use as he travels the country with rodeo and by "Riding for the Brand" during his appearances and while commentating on Ride TV.

Roy Cooper poses with his wrapped Tate Branch Auto Group pickup he will use as he travels the country with rodeo and by “Riding for the Brand” during his appearances and while commentating on Ride TV.

Roy Cooper is a Hall-of-Fame cowboy and an eight-time world champion.

He also is “Riding for the Brand” as part of the Tate Branch Auto Group team, and he will carry that brand with him to numerous rodeos throughout the year and as a broadcaster on Ride TV, where he will be broadcasting from Western sports events from across the country.

Roy Cooper

Roy Cooper

Born in Hobbs, N.M., and raised on rodeo and ranching, Cooper won his first two Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association title in 1976, finishing that season as the top tie-down roper in the game and the Rookie of the Year. He followed that with five more gold buckles in that discipline and added the most coveted crown in the game in 1983 as the World Champion All-Around Cowboy.

That same season, he won the steer roping title, establishing himself as one of the greatest all-around ropers to have ever played the game, polishing off a Triple Crown season in which he won three titles in a given season. He owns 32 qualifications to the National Finals, most of which came in tie-down roping. In 1981, he also appeared at the NFR, heeling for World Champion H.P. Evetts.

Cooper has been inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame and the Rodeo Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. He also is the father of three sons: Clint, a five-time NFR qualifier who grew up in Lovington, N.M.; Clif, a four-time NFR qualifier; and Tuf, a seven-time NFR qualifier and a three-time and the reigning world champion tie-down roper. Both Clint and Clif are part of the Tate Branch Auto Group team.

For his promotional work with “Riding for the Brand,” Cooper has received a newly wrapped Ram Truck, courtesy of Tate Branch Auto Group in the New Mexico communities of Hobbs, Artesia and Carlsbad.

“We are extremely excited to have Roy Cooper join our team of cowboys and cowgirls who are ‘Riding for the Brand,’ ” said Joby Houghtaling, the director of operations of the Tate Branch Auto Group. “Roy is a living rodeo legend who will be fun to watch covering rodeos and other events across this great nation of ours on Ride TV.”

Tate Branch-logo

postheadericon Rodeo’s best crave titles in Guymon

GUYMON, Okla. – The most coveted trophy in rodeo is the Montana Silversmiths world champion’s gold buckle.

Many who have earned them have them fastened to another prestigious trophy, the belt awarded to champions of the Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo. The race for this year’s championship belts is set for Monday, April 27-Sunday, May 3, at Henry C. Hitch Pioneer Arena. Performances will take place at 7:30 p.m. Friday; 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday; and 2 p.m. Sunday.

Trevor Brazile

Trevor Brazile

Like every other trophy Trevor Brazile has, there are multiple Pioneer Days belts on display in his Decatur, Texas, home. The 21-time world champion – 12 all-around, five steer roping, three tie-down roping and one heading – is the reigning all-around titlist in Guymon.

He loves the opportunity to win more.

“I grew up 30 minutes from Guymon,” he said, referring to a childhood spent in Gruver, Texas. “I’ve still got a lot of friends up there.

“It’s a great rodeo. I love the fans up there. They’re die-hard fans. When you go to Guymon, you’re pretty sure the wind’s going to blow. You’re not sure if it’s going to be cold or hot, but it’s a cowboy environment. I just enjoy it.”

Why shouldn’t he? Each May, he is the favorite to walk away with multiple titles, just like he did in 2012; that season, he won the all-around, heading (with heeling partner Patrick Smith) and steer roping crowns.

But Brazile isn’t the only world champion wearing the prized belt. In 2010 after winning the bareback riding championship, three-time titlist Will Lowe of Canyon, Texas, received his trophy two nights before the start of the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. He ripped off the belt he was wearing, unfastened his 2003 gold buckle and attached it to the new leather.

Turtle Powell

Turtle Powell

Turtle Powell, the 2011 heading world champion from Stephenville, Texas, won the Guymon title a year ago, while 2014 bull riding world titlist Sage Kimzey of Strong City, Okla., parlayed his top score in No Man’s Land to his first gold buckle.

Other world champions have found great success inside Hitch Arena in recent years are Ryan Jarrett, Matt Sherwood, Rocky Patterson, Jhett Johnson, Chad Ferley, Dean Gorsuch and Tuf Cooper. All are regulars in the Oklahoma Panhandle each May, but the competition isn’t just limited to the elite players in the game. In fact, nearly 1,000 contestants make their way to Texas County each spring.

The week begins with four rounds of steer roping Monday and Tuesday, followed by the team ropers, tie-down ropers and steer wrestlers Wednesday and Thursday competing in two rounds. The top scores in the aggregate return for the performances. Barrel racers compete in the first round Friday morning, with the top times returning to the performances; the remaining cowgirls will make their second-round runs shortly after the first round is complete.

“We’re there all week, which makes it nice; I need a time-share, but there aren’t a lot of them in Guymon,” Brazile said with a laugh. “It’s important to me to go to the rodeos that keep tradition alive, and they do that well in Guymon. I’m happy to support it.”

postheadericon Tierney puts his stock in Sox

A good veterinarian and a lot of TLC go a long ways in the world of rodeo.

Just ask Jess Tierney, a four-time qualifier to the Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping and a regular at the Timed Event Championship of the World.

Like all other steer ropers, Tierney relies heavily on his main mount, a 14-year-old he calls Sox. But the talented gelding just returned to the arena after a seven-month stint on injured reserve after suffering a leg injury last July.

Jess Tierney

Jess Tierney

“I was giving him some time off, so he was just in the pasture,” Tierney said. “When I got there, the whole pasture was full of puddles of blood, and he’d lost about 300 pounds.”

Tierney loaded the horse in a trailer and quickly shuffled Sox to the veterinarian, who put the animal in a cast.

“We had to keep him boxed up for a long time,” he said, referring to being in a confined pen to obtain the right care and keep an eye on healing. “We finally got him turned out this winter. We got a shoe on him right before San Antonio and the Timed Event.”

Sox has responded quite well. While Tierney traveled the rodeo trail, his girlfriend put in the work needed to care for the horse.

“She put in about four months of labor,” he said.

That tender, loving care paid dividends. Since Sox has returned to action, Tierney has earned more than $34,000 in competition. Half that came from the Timed Event, where Tierney finished third overall competing in heading, heeling, tie-down roping, steer wrestling and steer roping.

The other half came in steer roping, with the lion’s share earned at the San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo. He added nearly $5,000 this past weekend at the Ron Ross Memorial Steer Roping in Liberty, Texas.

Even though he finished 2014 without Sox in the arena, Tierney finished the year fourth in the steer roping world standings. It was his best season to date.

Now that he has his primary mount back on the road, he hopes to parlay it into a run for the gold buckle. Though he’s competed in just two events so far, Tierney is sixth in the world standings. With a full season of steer roping yet to go, he has a great shot at realizing his world-title dreams.A good veterinarian and a lot of TLC go a long ways in the world of rodeo.

Just ask Jess Tierney, a four-time qualifier to the Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping and a regular at the Timed Event Championship of the World.

Like all other steer ropers, Tierney relies heavily on his main mount, a 14-year-old he calls Sox. But the talented gelding just returned to the arena after a seven-month stint on injured reserve after suffering a leg injury last July.

“I was giving him some time off, so he was just in the pasture,” Tierney said. “When I got there, the whole pasture was full of puddles of blood, and he’d lost about 300 pounds.”

Tierney loaded the horse in a trailer and quickly shuffled Sox to the veterinarian, who put the animal in a cast.

“We had to keep him boxed up for a long time,” he said, referring to being in a confined pen to obtain the right care and keep an eye on healing. “We finally got him turned out this winter. We got a shoe on him right before San Antonio and the Timed Event.”

Sox has responded quite well. While Tierney traveled the rodeo trail, his girlfriend put in the work needed to care for the horse.

“She put in about four months of labor,” he said.

That tender, loving care paid dividends. Since Sox has returned to action, Tierney has earned more than $34,000 in competition. Half that came from the Timed Event, where Tierney finished third overall competing in heading, heeling, tie-down roping, steer wrestling and steer roping.

The other half came in steer roping, with the lion’s share earned at the San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo. He added nearly $5,000 this past weekend at the Ron Ross Memorial Steer Roping in Liberty, Texas.

Even though he finished 2014 without Sox in the arena, Tierney finished the year fourth in the steer roping world standings. It was his best season to date.

Now that he has his primary mount back on the road, he hopes to parlay it into a run for the gold buckle. Though he’s competed in just two events so far, Tierney is sixth in the world standings. With a full season of steer roping yet to go, he has a great shot at realizing his world-title dreams.

postheadericon Rangers use support for success

ALVA, Okla. – It takes talent, perseverance and a lot of support to be successful in rodeo, and the members of the Northwestern Oklahoma State University rodeo team know that as well as anyone.

Steer wrestler Stephen Culling of Fort St. John, British Columbia, used it all to a third-place finish this past weekend at the Fort Scott (Kan.) Community College Rodeo. Riding a horse he is borrowing from fellow Canadian ProRodeo cowboy Clayton Moore, Culling won the first round and finished third in the two-run average in Fort Scott.

Stephen Culling

Stephen Culling

But it didn’t come without the help he gets from other Rangers, including coach Stockton Graves, a Northwestern alumnus who has qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo seven times.

“He’s just proves himself, and he spends a lot of time helping us out and getting us to that stage,” he said, noting that he also receives a lot of support from roommate Laine Herl of Goodland, Kan., and traveling partner Mike McGinn of Haines, Ore.; all three are in the top eight in the Central Plains Region standings, joining Grayson Allred of Kanarraville, Utah, and Tyler Batie of Rapid City, S.D.

“Good competition makes you step up and try to make you do better,” said Culling, who credits much of his success to Moore’s horse, Santos, a 13-year-old that has been used quite a bit in ProRodeo. “It’s hard because you know all of you aren’t going to get to go, but it’s good to see your friends and traveling partners also do good.”

Culling led the way for Northwestern with his No. 3 finish, but he was joined in the championship round by two other bulldoggers, Batie, who placed third overall, and Chase Lako of Arthur, Neb., who placed fourth. They were joined in the short round by heeler William Whayne of Tulsa, Okla., who qualified with header Connor Osborne of Connors (Okla.) State College.

“Our (men’s) team is strong,” Culling said.

The Northwestern women definitely are good. They lead the region standings and finished runner-up in Fort Scott. Rangers Shayna Miller of Faith, S.D., and Lauren Barnes of Buckeye, Ariz., tied for third in the average in goat-tying; they are the top two in the goat-tying standings, with Miller owning a 60-point lead.

“If I don’t win the region, I want another girl from our team to win it,” Miller said.

Barnes won the first round, posting a 7.2-second run. Miller then finished fourth in the short round with a 7.9; both finished with a 15.9-second two-run cumulative time. They were joined in the short round by barrel racer Paige Winnett of Elmore City, Okla., and breakaway roper Cassy Woodward of Dupree, S.D.

The teams will have four weeks off until the next event, scheduled for April 9-11 in Weatherford, Okla., and will close out the season with three events over those three weekends in April.

“I just look at it like I have six runs to make,” Miller said, referring to her game plan on trying to secure the region title. “I’m counting on making the short round at the next three and putting six more runs together.

“I can’t relax. There are (several) weeks between rodeos. It would be easy to settle and chill for a while, but I’ve got to keep right at it.”

That work is a good reason why she and the women’s team lead the Central Plains standings.

“I’m just going to keep my horse in shape and keep myself in shape,” she said. “I’ll just try to keep my head right and stay positive heading to the next three and try to kick butt.”

postheadericon Brazile wins 7th Timed Event title

TEXAN BECOMES FIRST COWBOY TO WIN THE $100,000 FIRST-PLACE PRIZE

GUTHRIE, Okla. – Trevor Brazile is the most decorated cowboy in ProRodeo history.

On Sunday afternoon, he added another prestigious championship to his trophy case, winning the Timed Event Championship of the World for a record seventh time. In the process, he pocketed $116,000 – most came in the form of the average title, which paid $100,000 for the first time ever; the rest he earned by having the two fastest go-rounds of this year’s competition.

Trevor Brazile

Trevor Brazile

“This is the event of the purist in my events,” said Brazile, who scored a 43.7-second second round Friday night and a 45.8 Saturday night. “I’ve always loved it. It means a lot just because of everything entails. It’s 25 head. It’s a fun contest.”

He utilized a steady approach to claim the top prize, outdistancing runner-up Paul David Tierney by 25 seconds.

“You’ve got a game plan when you come here,” he said. “I try not to back off too much. I try to be efficient, but not overly protective.

“I’ve had a two-year hiatus from here. Coming back, you always question it. I felt like I could do it still, but until you come and do it, you never know.”

He knows very well. Over his nearly two decades of competing in the “Ironman of ProRodeo,” Brazile has earned $751,500.

Paul David Tierney

Paul David Tierney

“Not just the money has made it better,” he said, referring to the winner’s payout doubling from $50,000. “I think it added more excitement and obviously there was more on the line, but I think this is the most even set of stock they’ve had. I think that helped keep it even throughout.

“This is probably the closest field I’ve seen. As a whole, it was keeping the pack together due to the quality of stock that was here. It let a guy do his job. There weren’t as many eliminators here as there has been.”

Still, the top players in this game were challenged.

Jess Tierney

Jess Tierney

“It was tough,” said Tierney, the reigning champion who has finished among the top two each of the past three years. “Everybody roped good, and having Trevor come back and being able to compete against him was good. He’s got to come back next year so we can have it out again.”

He was one of two Tierneys to finish atop the standings. Older brother Jess, a four-time qualifier to the Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping, placed third. Between them, the Tierneys collected $42,000. That’s pretty good for the sons of ProRodeo legend, Paul Tierney, a four-time Timed Event champion.

“This is just a great event, and you get to go up against guys like Trevor, K.C. Jones and Daniel Green,” Jess Tierney said. “It’s the best event all year. I hope I can be like dad and come here until I’m 60.”

RESULTS
AVERAGE: 1. Trevor Brazile, 290.7 seconds on 25 runs, $100,000; 2. Paul David Tierney, 305.6, $25,000; 3. Jess Tierney, 331.4, $15,000; 4. Josh Peek, 364.8, $10,000; 5. Clay Smith, 373.1, $7,500; 6. Kyle Lockett, 381.0, $5,000; 7. Erich Rogers, 384.0, $4,500; 8. Russell Cardoza, 407.5, $3,000.
FASTEST ROUND: 1. Trevor Brazile, 43.7, $10,000; 2. Trevor Brazile, 45.8, $6,000; 3. Kyle Lockett, 48.7, $5,000; 4. Russell Cardoza, 51.1, $4,000; 5. Erich Rogers, 51.6, $3,000; 6. Jess Tierney, 52.8, $2,000.
TOTAL MONEY: 1. Trevor Brazile, $116,000; 2. Paul David Tierney, $25,000; 3. Jess Tierney, $17,000; 4. Josh Peek and Kyle Lockett, $10,000 each; 6. Clay Smith and Erich Rogers, $7,500; 8. Russell Cardoza, $7,000.

postheadericon Timed Event results

AVERAGE: 1. Trevor Brazile, 290.7 seconds on 25 runs, $100,000; 2. Paul David Tierney, 305.6, $25,000; 3. Jess Tierney, 331.4, $15,000; 4. Josh Peek, 364.8, $10,000; 5. Clay Smith, 373.1, $7,500; 6. Kyle Lockett, 381.0, $5,000; 7. Erich Rogers, 384.0, $4,500; 8. Russell Cardoza, 407.5, $3,000.
FASTEST ROUND: 1. Trevor Brazile, 43.7, $10,000; 2. Trevor Brazile, 45.8, $6,000; 3. Kyle Lockett, 48.7, $5,000; 4. Russell Cardoza, 51.1, $4,000; 5. Erich Rogers, 51.6, $3,000; 6. Jess Tierney, 52.8, $2,000.
TOTAL MONEY: 1. Trevor Brazile, $116,000; 2. Paul David Tierney, $25,000; 3. Jess Tierney, $17,000; 4. Josh Peek and Kyle Lockett, $10,000 each; 6. Clay Smith and Erich Rogers, $7,500; 8. Russell Cardoza, $7,000.

postheadericon Brazile leads a fast fourth round

GUTHRIE, Okla. – The fourth go-round of the Timed Event Championship of the World was fast and exciting.

In fact, four of the top six fastest round times of the weekend happened Saturday night at the Lazy E Arena. It’s making for an exciting sprint to the finish Sunday afternoon.

Trevor Brazile

Trevor Brazile

“I usually try to not watch much of the other competition, but when it’s as good watching as it is here, the fan in me comes out,” said leader Trevor Brazile, who has posted a 20-run cumulative time of 212.2 seconds, on pace to set a new record for the fastest aggregate. “It’s fun. There are a lot of good runs. There is a lot to be watching for.”

Brazile led the way again Saturday night, posting a 45.8-second go-round – it is the second fastest round so far this weekend behind the 43.7 he posted Friday night. Kyle Lockett, a two-time champion, scored a 48.7, followed by Russell Cardoza’s 51.1 and Jess Tierney’s 52.8.

It all happened before another large crowd.

“They have raised the stakes,” Brazile said, referring to the increased purse of $200,000, of which $100,000 is paid to the average champion. “They doubled first place. That’s a game-changer. You can see it by the contestants and the fans.”

Brazile owns eight of the top 10 fastest times in the Timed Event’s 31-year history, including the top six. He is also the event’s only six-time champion.

“When I have a chance (to post a fast round), and it comes down to the steer roping, it makes me a touch more aggressive,” he said, noting that bonuses are paid to the top six fastest rounds each year. “I didn’t come here to win anything in the rounds. If I have a chance, I try to capitalize on it.”

Brazile owns a 22.5-second lead over the man in second place, defending champion Paul David Tierney, whose older brother, Jess, is third.

RESULTS
AVERAGE LEADERS: 1. Trevor Brazile, 212.2 seconds on 20 runs; 2. Paul David Tierney, 234.7; 3. Jess Tierney, 238.5; 4. Erich Rogers, 272.1; 5. Josh Peek, 298.6; 6. Clay Smith, 315.4.
ROUND 4: 1. Trevor Brazile, 45.8 seconds; 2. Kyle Lockett, 48.7; 3. Russell Cardoza, 51.1; 4. Jess Tierney, 52.8; 5. Paul David Tierney, 55.9; 6. Erich Rogers, 59.8.
FASTEST ROUND LEADERS: 1. Trevor Brazile, 43.7; 2. Trevor Brazile, 45.8; 3. Kyle Lockett, 48.7; 4. Russell Cardoza, 51.1; 5. Erich Rogers, 51.6; 6. Jess Tierney, 52.8.

postheadericon Tierney brothers just behind Brazile

GUTHRIE, Okla. – Between them, the Tierney family owns five Timed Event Championship of the World gold buckles.

Patriarch Paul Tierney earned four in his hall-of-fame career, while youngest son Paul David Tierney is the reigning champ. The Tierneys are tied with K.C. Jones with the second most titles in the “Ironman of ProRodeo” and trail just one man, six-time winner Trevor Brazile.

Trevor Brazile

Trevor Brazile

Through three go-rounds of this year’s championship, Paul David and Jess Tierney sit Nos. 2 and 3 in the average standings and trail just one man, Brazile, who has roped, tied and wrestled 15 head in 166.4 seconds. Paul David is second in 178.8, and Jess has scored 185.7. They are well ahead of the rest of the field: the fourth-place cowboy, Erich Rogers, is 212.3.

“Anybody here is capable of being 2-3 at any time,” Jess Tierney said. “If you get on top of the cattle, you’ve got to take advantage of them.”

Drawing good calves and steers makes a difference in this unique championship, in which each contestant must compete in heading, heeling, tie-down roping, steer wrestling and steer roping.

Jess Tierney

Jess Tierney

“We’re trying to take advantage of a good situation,” he said.

They are, and so is Brazile, a 21-time PRCA world champion who also owns a record 12 all-around gold buckles. He also has had considerable success inside the Lazy E Arena.

“He’s always been the gatekeeper around here,” Jess Tierney said. “He’s such a great cowboy. Even when I’m competing against him, I’m always watching him, trying to learn something. He’s the best.

“He’s an inspiration just watching him.”

The Tierneys grew up with a pretty inspiring person in their father. When they’re at home in South Dakota, they practice all five disciplines that make up the Timed Event. Between that, working on the ranch and having a father who competed in the Lazy E Arena every March for so many years, they are tailor made for the rugged championship.

“Dad always tells us that you’ve got it one run at a time. You’ve just got to look at what you’re doing right then,” Jess Tierney said. “You’ve just got to look at what you’re doing right then. Based on that, we’re staying steady and not trying to get ahead of ourselves much.”

RESULTS
AVERAGE LEADERS:
1. Trevor Brazile, 166.4; 2. Paul David Tierney, 178.8; 3. Jess Tierney, 185.7; 4. Erich Rogers, 212.3; 5. Josh Peek, 224.8; 6. Clay Smith, 241.7
ROUND 3: 1. Trevor Brazile, 56.3 seconds; 2. Paul David Tierney, 57.5; 3. Josh Peek, 58.8; 4. Erich Rogers, 59.3; 5. Jess Tierney, 67.1; 6. Landon McClaugherty, 67.6.