Archive for February, 2011

postheadericon A fun site to see

Colby Yates is fantastically talented.

As a bull rider, he’s proven it with qualifications to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo and the Professional Bull Riders World Finals. On Saturday night, he won the Iron Cowboy at the home of the Dallas Cowboys, Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas.

He’s also a pretty talented song writer and singer, which is something he takes with him on the bull riding circuit.

I got to hang with Colby a couple years ago and learn a little more about him and his then-wife-to-be, Katie. Seeing them celebrating Colby’s big win Saturday night was surely special.

postheadericon McCoy brothers’ ‘Unfinished Business’ is to be continued

Eleven teams who felt short of winning the $1 million prize during their inaugural around the globe return for another adventure in the 18th installment of “The Amazing Race: Unfinished Business,” which premiered Sunday. Standing left to right, father/son Mel and Mike White; Harlem Globetrotters Herb Lang and Nate Lofton; father/daughter Ron and Christina Hsu; father/daughter Gary and Mallory Ervin; mother/son Margie and Luke Adams; dating Goths Kent Kaliber and Vyxsin Fiala; engaged couple Amanda Blackledge and Kris Klicka; best friends  Zev Glassenberg and Justin Kanew; and former NFL cheerleaders Jaime Edmondson and Cara Rosenthal. Kneeling left to right, sisters Kisha and Jennifer Hoffman, and cowboys Jet and Cord McCoy. Photo: Robert Voets/CBS © CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Eleven teams who felt short of winning the $1 million prize during their inaugural around the globe return for another adventure in the 18th installment of “The Amazing Race: Unfinished Business,” which premiered Sunday. Standing left to right, father/son Mel and Mike White; Harlem Globetrotters Herb Lang and Nate Lofton; father/daughter Ron and Christina Hsu; father/daughter Gary and Mallory Ervin; mother/son Margie and Luke Adams; dating Goths Kent Kaliber and Vyxsin Fiala; engaged couple Amanda Blackledge and Kris Klicka; best friends Zev Glassenberg and Justin Kanew; and former NFL cheerleaders Jaime Edmondson and Cara Rosenthal. Kneeling left to right, sisters Kisha and Jennifer Hoffman, and cowboys Jet and Cord McCoy. Photo: Robert Voets/CBS © CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

“To Be Continued” seems to be the perfect name of the opening night of “The Amazing Race: Unfinished Business,” the 18th season of the CBS-TV reality series.

Oklahoma cowboy brothers Jet and Cord McCoy took off on their second trip around the world for $1 million in the 12-week series that premiered Sunday night. Through the hour-long episode, there were plenty of twists and turns as the 11 teams faced their first challenge, finding the answer to a clue issued by host Phil Keoghan.

As the show concluded, 10 of the 11 teams had reached the first “pit stop,” the ending point of each episode and usually rest area for the competitors. The one pair that didn’t meet up with Keoghan were the McCoys, ranch-raised cowboys from tiny Tupelo, Okla., that have been rodeo stars throughout much of their lives. The other teams, though, learned the pit stop wasn’t much of a break though; Keoghan urged all the teams to continue racing and handed them their next clue.

“Stakes are high, but as you know, second chances don’t come free,” he said, referring to the theme of this season’s series, which features some of the most popular teams from previous seasons – the McCoys were on Season 16, which aired last spring.

The first challenge had each team running through a plethora of paper airplanes to find the name of Qaantas. The first eight teams to do so earned the right to fly from Los Angeles to Sydney, Australia, on the first leg of the race, while the final three teams were scheduled to land 90 minutes later. The McCoys were on the first flight.

“Man, it is awesome,” Jet said as he drove to Los Angeles International Airport.

“It’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity … again,” Cord responded.

But that didn’t mean they arrived first in Sydney. Another passenger on the first flight became ill, so the plane diverted to Honolulu, putting those eight teams behind.

The McCoys fell behind the pack a little, then missed a train and a ferry. That put the brothers in last place, but they remained upbeat.

“This race can turn anywhere at any time,” Cord said.

Once in Australia, the teams faced their first “road block,” where one of the partners must scuba dive into a tank filled with sharks, stingrays and other sea life in search of a compass. Jet took to the water for Team McCoy.

“I’m from Oklahoma; I don’t do water. I don’t even take a bath,” Jet said with a laugh.

The teams then used the compass to help decipher the massage made with the flags: Go to the “MANLY 16 FT SKIFF SAILING CLUB. FIND THE COMMODORE. (Tell him) I AM BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA.”

Every team found the club and the commodore, and all but the McCoys were able to give the message, the last piece of the puzzle, to the commodore. In fact, Jet was still having trouble deciphering the puzzle when the show ended and the bold letters, “To Be Continued,” blared across the screen.

The father-daughter tandem of Gary and Mallory Ervin won the first leg of the race and the “express pass,” which will enable the team to skip a challenge along the way.

The McCoys, however, don’t know their fate. As the only team who didn’t reach the pit stop in the opening episode, they may be eliminated. But that information is “To Be Continued.”

postheadericon Yates wins interesting tournament

The Iron Cowboy tournament format is rather interesting.

Typically it’s man vs. beast, but inside Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas, on Saturday night, it was man vs. man, and even when the beast won, it came down to which man stayed atop the bull longer. Sometimes it came down to hundredths of a second.

Still, Colby Yates won the event and $50,000 in his home state of Texas’ biggest Professional Bull Riders event of the year. Yates rode just two bulls, but he might’ve had the best ride of the year so far when he matched moves with Carillo Cartel for 92.25 points. The biggest part of that was the pressure on Yates.

You see, that ride happened during the quarterfinals during his match with J.B. Mauney, who had just scored a 90 on Chicken on a Chain. Yates knew he had to score above that phenomenal score if he was going to advance to the semifinals.

As the bull spun, Yates let go with his outside leg and spurred for most of the eight-second ride. His 3.2-second ride was better than Valderon de Oliveira’s 3.0, so Yates advanced to the finals to face Austin Meier, where Yates earned the title by staying on his bull 2.5 seconds, just hundredths of a second longer than Meier.

The format was strange but exciting, and Yates earned the right to the title.

postheadericon Earning that money

How much money can you make in a day?

On Saturday, Cody Whitney collected $24,449 by winning the Seminole Hard Rock Xtreme Bulls Tour stop in San Antonio. He won the first round, the championship round and, of course, the aggregate title.

Cody Whitney

Cody Whitney

That’s what they call 40 percenting an event, meaning Whitney, of Asher, Okla., earned 40 percent of the prize purse available. It’s a pretty nice feeling when it happens.

“I don’t think you could ask for much more,” Whitney told ProRodeo Sports News’ Marvin Olberding.

Whitney who rode Andrews Rodeo’s Outlaw for 91.5 points to win the opening round and $7,191 and D&H Cattle Co.’s Slim Chance for 92.5 points to win the second and $5,273.

“I was pretty confident getting on that last bull,” he said in a story posted on the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association’s website, ProRodeo.com. “I rode him here at the Xtreme Bulls last year in the long round, and I went 92 on him. I knew I had enough bull to get enough points to win, so it was up to me to stay on him.”

So let’s break this down:

– Whitney earned $12,225 for each ride.

– He had two qualified rides, staying on his bulls for 16 seconds. That equals $1,528 per second of work.

Most people would take that kind of wage. Of course, most people wouldn’t tie their hand to a bucking beast or pay a fee to do so.

So maybe Whitney earned his San Antonio salary.

postheadericon Who will win the Iron Cowboy?

Twenty-four cowboys from the Professional Bull Riders Built Ford Tough Series will see their likenesses on the biggest screen in sports.

The Dickies Iron Cowboy Invitational presented by Winstar World Casino will begin at 7 p.m. (Central) Saturday at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas, and will air on a “tape-delay” programming beginning at 8 p.m. It will feature a tournament-style format, where the cowboys will compete against one another in an effort to advance in the bracket.

It’s a different type of format for the sport, and it looks pretty interesting. Oklahoman Austin Meier is the top seed in the tournament, and the top eight seeds have received first-round byes. Meier will face the winner of the Stormy Wing-Pistol Robinson match.

Most bull riding arenas seat 8,000-18,000 fans, but last year’s event at Cowboys Stadium drew 46,500 fans, according to the PBR. That’s a lot of bull power.

So who do you think will win the Iron Cowboy? What do you think of the format?

postheadericon Cowboys have ‘Unfinished Business’ on ‘The Amazing Race’

Cowboy brothers Jet and Cord make their way to the Pit Stop on Shelly Beach in Manly, Australia in the 18th installment of "The Amazing Race: Unfinished Business," premiering at 7 p.m. (Central) Sunday, Feb. 20, on the CBS Television Network. Photo: Robert Voets/CBS ©2011 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Cowboy brothers Jet and Cord make their way to the Pit Stop on Shelly Beach in Manly, Australia in the 18th installment of "The Amazing Race: Unfinished Business," premiering at 7 p.m. (Central) Sunday, Feb. 20, on the CBS Television Network. Photo: Robert Voets/CBS ©2011 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

The bottom line is that Jet and Cord McCoy are competitors, from brotherly contests growing up to competing for rodeo championships or racing around the world for $1 million.

That’s why they’re back competing in the CBS-TV reality series “The Amazing Race: Unfinished Business,” which will air at 7 p.m. (Central) Sundays beginning Feb. 20. Season 18 of the show will feature the return of contestants who did not win the top prize their first time on the series.

Jet and Cord McCoy: Photo by Monty Brinton/CBS ©2010 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Jet and Cord McCoy: Photo by Monty Brinton/CBS ©2010 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.

The brothers, who grew up on the family’s ranch near the southeast Oklahoma community of Tupelo, finished second last spring in Season 16 of the reality program. During the 12-week series, the cowboys became fan favorites, and already there is a distinct buzz about Season 18. So what drew the McCoys back to the show?

“I think it’s the thing that drew us the first time,” said Jet McCoy, 31, a five-time International Professional Rodeo Association champion who lives in Ada, Okla., with his wife, Ashlee, and their daughter, Ti Silver. It’s the “competition and just being entered and a shot at $1 million.”

Eleven teams will begin the race around the world for the top prize. Along the way, they will face challenges through the various legs of the race. Typically the first team to conclude a leg of the race earns a prize, while last team will be subject to elimination. The team that completes the final leg of the race will be crowned champion.

“Everybody’s been there, done that,” Jet said of this season’s cast. “A lot of teams that are returning, it was just one mistake, one thing happened that knocked them out, and it’s something they could learn from.

The McCoys made a few mistakes in Season 16, but they overcame most of them. In fact, the brothers won four of the 12 legs of the race – they won two sailboats, a trip to Alaska, a trip to Patagonia and a trip to Maui.

“When we got done the first time, I thought, ‘Wow, what a once-in-a-lifetime experience,’ ” said Cord McCoy, 30, who also owns five IPRA titles and has qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo and the Professional Bull Riders World Finals. “Surprise. Apparently there was some ‘Unfinished Business’ for us.”

The race was recorded over 28 days last November and December. In fact, the brothers took off on their venture just days after Cord celebrated his wedding for the former Sara Best – the Maui trip was used for the honeymoon. And while there was a familiarity in the situation – Cord had just proposed to Sara before the Season 16 race, then had to leave for a month without contact with his new fiancé – it was still difficult for the McCoys to say goodbye.

“It was more difficult for me this time,” Jet said. “The first time you really didn’t know what it was going to be like. It was the first time I had been away from my family since we’d been married. This time I knew what it was going to be like, so it was definitely harder.”

Since the show was recorded months ago, it enables the brothers to watch each episode, typically with those closest to them.

“We had more family get-togethers from the ‘Amazing Race 16,’ ” Cord said. “We had 12 family reunions. That was so awesome to spend that much time with your whole family. I’m looking forward to it.”

So is his brother.

“That was, by far, the most fun for me the first time around,” Jet said. “Every Sunday night we had a big get-together with family and friends.”

This season’s series, “The Amazing Race: Unfinished Business,” has an appropriate name. The race around the world is amazing, the brothers said, and they’d like to improve upon their second-place finish from last spring.

“We don’t have any regrets from the first race, but on the other hand, to be that close and finish second is a big disappointment,” Jet said in a CBS video biography on the cowboys. “There are so many outside variables in this thing that it’s really anybody’s game. In this game, everybody’s already been through once, so they know what to expect … or think they do.

“So it’s going to be tough. It’s going to be all out. It’s going to be interesting.”

postheadericon Sherwood is hip to the MAXX

In his two trips to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, team roper Matt Sherwood has made the most of his opportunities.

Matt Sherwood

Matt Sherwood

Both times, in 2006 and ’08, Sherwood walked away from the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas with the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association heading world championships.

On Thursday, he added to a long list of accomplishments by signing a partnership agreement with MAXX Sunglasses – Sherwood joins barrel racer Tana Poppino in endorsing the Colorado-based company.

“I wear sunglasses whenever I am competing or practicing outdoors and
also when I am driving from rodeo to rodeo, which is a constant part of my life,”
Sherwood said. “I really like MAXX sunglasses because they are a quality
product offered in dozens of styles at a price that everyone can afford. I think it
is exciting that the company is expanding its presence in the sport of rodeo.”

In association with the agreement facilitated by Sherwood’s representative, Mike Donnell of Donnell Rodeo Promotions, the team roper will serve as a marketing associate for MAXX, showing off the company’s logo while competing, conducting clinics or making public appearances. He will also wear MAXX sunglasses when practical.

“We started our involvement in rodeo and the western lifestyle market with our sponsorship of pro barrel racer Tana Poppino,” said Lauren Williams, MAXX’s director of public relations. “We have been so pleased with the acceptance of our product in this market and so impressed with the quality of the people we have met in the rodeo world that we wanted to expand our involvement with the sponsorship of another top rodeo athlete.

“Matt Sherwood is a quality individual, a proven winner and will be an excellent representative for us. This also is consistent with our belief that a strong sports marketing program will help our company and our retailers market to consumers with active, outdoor lifestyles.”

postheadericon Wimberly benefit changed

The McKennon Wimberly Benefit & Bull Riding has been moved because of conflicts at the original arena.

The event is confirmed for March 24-26 at the Palo Pinto County Livestock Association Arena, 800 FM 1821 N, Mineral Wells, Texas.

There will be a barbecue dinner and Calcutta at the Expo Center. The bull riding, futurity bull competition, mutton busting competition and a classic bull riding will take place at the arena. Tickets are $16 for box seats ant $10 for general admission.

Donations can be made to the McKennon Wimberly Benefit Fund, First Financial Bank, College Park, P.O. Box 1299, Weatherford, TX 76086. Silent auction donations can be sent to 606 Southland Dr., Weatherford, TX 76086. Contact Luann for more information at (817) 565-6708.

postheadericon The CBR at the NFR

This is as seen in newest edition Short Round magazine, the official publication of Championship Bull Riding. For subscriptions, go to http://theshortround.com/.

Just click on the link, and it’ll take you to the PDF: CBR-NFR

Click on this link, and you can see the two-page spread: CBR-NFR-spread

postheadericon The ‘Iron Man’

Developed in 1985 by the Lazy E Arena near Guthrie, Okla., the annual Timed Event Championship is a rugged test of the top all-around timed-event cowboys in the world.

This year’s championship is scheduled for March 4-6 and will feature, as always, 20 excellent competitors. It’s a showcase of folks who can rope anything and wrestle steers; even guys who can’t bulldog sure give it a shot.

It’s one heck of a show, and the contestants must rope a calf, head, heel, rope and tie down a steer and wrestle a steer, and they must do it in each of the five go-rounds over three days.

It’s unique, mystical and grueling, and only the best need apply.

Our Partners

RodeoMediaRelations

4BWebDesign

EverythingCowboy

Photos

twisTEDrodeoPhotos