postheadericon Great animals leading the charge for Carr Pro Rodeo

Royce Ford rides Riverboat Annie during the 2009 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. Riverboat Annie, the 2007 reserve world champion bareback horse, is one of the great animal athletes from Carr Pro Rodeo, which will have livestock at the Waller County Fair and Rodeo, set for Friday and Saturday in Hempstead, Texas.

Royce Ford rides Riverboat Annie during the 2009 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas. Riverboat Annie, the 2007 reserve world champion bareback horse, is one of the great animal athletes from Carr Pro Rodeo, which will have livestock at the Waller County Fair and Rodeo, set for Friday and Saturday in Hempstead, Texas.

HEMPSTEAD, Texas – There are an elite few who really understand what makes one of the world’s best bucking horses.

Pete Carr is one of those people. Carr, owner of Dallas based Carr Pro Rodeo, has a pasture full of outstanding animal athletes on the company’s ranch near Athens, Texas, and the herd is still growing. That is a win-win situation for rodeo fans in southeast Texas, because some of the best bucking animals in the sport will be part of this year’s Waller County Fair and Rodeo, set for 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30, and Saturday, Oct. 1.

In the event’s inaugural year to be part of ProRodeo, the organizers reached out to Carr to bring in his expert production and outstanding livestock to town.

“We’re pretty excited to be able to come to Hempstead, because the people there really want to put on a great show for the fans,” said Carr, who established the growing livestock firm six years ago. “We’ll definitely put on a show.”

Since its inception, Carr Pro Rodeo has made a name for itself by its exceptional bareback riding horses. In fact, Real Deal, a brown gelding, was named the 2005 Bareback Horse of the Year; Riverboat Annie, a red roan mare, was named the 2007 Reserve World Champion Bareback Horse. That’s just the foundation, and the top cowboys in the game recognize it.

In fact, it’s that type of reputation that led two-time Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifier Clint Cannon to recommend Carr to the Waller County rodeo committee.

“Pete’s just got a great pen of bucking horses, period,” said Cannon of Waller.

Another great bareback horse is MGM Deuces Night, a bay mare that has quickly established herself as one of the elite. Not too shabby for a 6-year-old horse; of course, Real Deal was just 6 years old when he won the halter.

“That’s a mare is just an awesome horse that’s good in the chute that gives you a chance to win every time you nod your head,” said Kelly Timberman, the 2004 world champion bareback rider from Mills, Wyo., who won the 10th round of the 2010 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo with an 88.5-point ride on Deuces Night. “I don’t care if the horse is dirty rank or hard to ride, I just want one to give me a chance to win first. That horse gives a guy a chance to win first every time, but you can say that about a lot of Pete’s horses.”

Carr purchased Deuces Night last year from bareback rider Wes Stevenson, a six-time qualifier to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo who purchased Deuces Night from the great Zinser bucking string.

“I knew she’d have a really good shot to come to the finals,” Stevenson said. “I knew she was that good, so part of the reason I sold her to Pete is that I knew she’d have a good shot to go to the finals. I bought her from Jim Zinser as a brood mare, but she bucked so good, I didn’t want to waste her sitting at my house. I wanted her to have a chance.

“She has a lot of heart. I was the first one to get on her with a rigging, and from the first time we ever bucked her, I knew that little filly has a lot of heart. She’s a very electric horse. She’s going to start doing some stuff right out of the box.”

Carr likes to see that in all his animals. He has a fantastic set of saddle broncs and a powerful set of bulls, both of which are developing stronger each year.

“Pete Carr’s a really good guy who works hard,” said Wesley Silcox, the 2007 world champion bull rider from Payson, Utah. “I don’t know him real well, but he’s trying real hard and trying to get us good stock we can get on. That’s what makes us want to go to his rodeos. He’s doing his best trying to get a bunch of good guys to come to his rodeos.”

Silcox isn’t the only bull rider who feels that way.

“Pete Carr cares about our opinion,” said Bryan Richardson, a three-time NFR qualifier from Dallas. “He wants to keep us happy, and he knows how to do it. A lot of contractors won’t try. They just want a bunch of working bulls that can go out there and buck a bunch of times a year.

“Pete understands that nowadays, the bull business is what it is. You can get a really good bull for not a lot of money, and then you’re going to get the good cowboys to come to your rodeo and compete on those bulls.”

Event organizers are drawn to Carr Pro Rodeo because of what they hear from contestants, and it’s a familiar theme. In a sport where money not only pays bills but also counts as championship points, contestants know they need every advantage they can get. They know what they’ll get when they go to a rodeo Carr produces.

“You definitely want to go somewhere that you have a chance to win,” said Casey Sisk of Corona, N.M., a rising star in saddle bronc riding. “Pete’s got a great pen of bucking horses, the kind you like getting on.”

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