Archive for November, 2011

postheadericon Grass Dancer

D.V. Fennell rides Grass Dancer during the 2009 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. This year marks the third straight year the buckskin will perform in Las Vegas.

D.V. Fennell rides Grass Dancer during the 2009 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. This year marks the third straight year the buckskin will perform in Las Vegas.

10-year-old buckskin mare
Bareback Riding
SIRE:
Buck
DAM:
Coca Cola

2010 NFR
Bucked off Matt Bright in Round 1 and was the high-marked bareback horse.

2009 NFR
D.V. Fennell scored 82 points in the fifth go-round.

This year
Heath Ford scored 84 to finish third and Joe Gunderson posted an 83 to finish in a tie for fourth at the Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo.

J.R. Vezain posted an 84-point ride to finish in a tie for fifth place at the West of the Pecos (Texas) Rodeo.

Casey Colletti and Tanner Aus both scored 86 points to finish in a tie for third place at the Eagle County (Colo.) Fair and Rodeo.

Caleb Bennett finished in a tie for eighth place with an 84 at the Lea County (N.M.) Fair and Rodeo.

Steven Anding scored 88 points to win the Waller County (Texas) Fair and Rodeo in its inaugural year in the PRCA.

2010
Caleb Bennett scored 84 and Casey Colletti scored 83, and both cowboys placed at the Eagle County (Colo.) Fair & rodeo.

Tilden Hooper finished in a tie for fifth place with an 84 at the West of the Pecos (Texas) Rodeo.

Bee Jay Scott and Cody DeMers each scored 84s on Grass Dancer to finish in a tie for fourth place at the Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo.

 ——————–

Grass Dancer shares the world record for the highest bareback score in the history of the PRCA. She’s been part of the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo three times.

“The combination of things really made a difference for me that day,” said Ryan Gray, who rode Grass Dancer for the world record-tying 94 points at the Eagle County (Colo.) Fair & Rodeo in 2009. “The horses were feeling good, and it was cool in Eagle. Grass Dancer is a great horse, and she had a great day. The match-up was there, and everything came together.”

“She was a saddle bronc horse that I moved over to bareback and has been a feature horse ever since,” said Pete Carr, owner of Carr Pro Rodeo. “She’s probably a better outdoor horse, but the bareback riders still take her to the NFR because of all her outstanding trips during the year outdoors.”

“I’ve gotten on that horse three or four times,” said Tilden Hooper, a three-time NFR qualifier from Carthage, Texas, who placed on Grass Dancer in Pecos, Texas, in 2010. “I was probably one of the first people to get on that horse. That horse really gets in the air. She has some nasty trips some times. She can jump in the air, break over and kick. I had her at Pecos, and I messed her up to be a really big score. She is always a horse that I look highly on.”

postheadericon Big Lights

9-year-old bay gelding
Bareback Riding

2010 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo
Steven Dent won the third round with an 85.

2009 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo
Jason Havens split the third go-round victory with an 85.

Heath Ford scored 76 in the eighth round.

This year
Bobby Mote won the semifinal round at the Dodge National Circuit Finals Rodeo with an 85.

Caine Riddle scored 85 at the Eagle County (Colo.) Fair and Rodeo to finish in a tie for fifth place.

Ryan Gray rode him for 86 points for fourth place and J.R. Vezaine scored 85 for a tie for fifth place at the Lea County Fair and Rodeo, a Silver Tour rodeo in Lovington, N.M.

2010
Craig Wisehart placed fourth with a 77 at the Silverton (Texas) Buck Wild Days Rodeo.

Cody DeMers scored 82 at the Lea County Fair & Rodeo in Lovington, N.M., good enough for eighth place.

Wes Stevenson placed at the Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo with an 81.

—————–

Big Lights has been selected to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo three times.

“He always bucks hard with a lot of direction change,” said Pete Carr, owner of Carr Pro Rodeo. “He never has the same pattern.”

postheadericon Alberta Child

7-year-old bay mare
Bareback Riding
SIRE:
Spotty Crop
DAM:
My Maria

This year
Jared Smith was 83 points, good enough for a tie for seventh place at the West of the Pecos (Texas) Rodeo.

J.R. Vezain scored 85 points on her to finish in a three-way tie for fifth place at the Eagle County (Colo.) Fair and Rodeo.

Seven-time NFR qualifier Wes Stevenson was bucked off the big mare at the Lea County Fair and Rodeo, a Silver Tour event in Lovington, N.M. She bucked off another cowboy and was unridden several times in 2011.

 —————-

This is the horse’s first trip to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

“I bought her as a 2-year-old futurity colt winner at a sale in North Dakota,” said Pete Carr, owner of Carr Pro Rodeo. “She came from David McDonald of Lac La Biche, Alberta, Canada. We let her grow up at the ranch, and then started easing her around last year to get her ready for this year.”

“Tilden Hooper was 92 points on her at a rodeo in Allen, Texas, and she’s been marked over 22 points 10 times this year. She’s pretty phenomenal. She is young, but if she keeps bucking like she has I look for her to come back to Vegas a few more times before she is done.”

postheadericon Black Coffee

Texas cowboy Chris Harris rides Black Coffee during the 2008 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. This year marks the third time in the horse's career the mare has been selected to the NFR.

Texas cowboy Chris Harris rides Black Coffee during the 2008 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. This year marks the third time in the horse's career the mare has been selected to the NFR.

11-year-old black mare
Bareback Riding
SIRE:
Wild Discovery
DAM:
Tribal Trail

This year
Brian Bain split the victory at the Lovington, N.M., Silver Tour rodeo with an 88-point ride on her.

 —————-

“I bought her as a 3-year-old futurity colt at a sale in North Dakota they same time I bought Riverboat Annie,” said Pete Carr, owner of Carr Pro Rodeo.

The horse came from David McDonald of Lac La Biche, Alberta.

Black Coffee has been selected for the WNFR three times

“She’s been to the NFR three times, and she has won serveal Wrangler Horse of the Night awards,” Carr said. “A few years ago in Eagle (Colo.), Will Lowe was 92 points on her.”

postheadericon Coffee Bean

This year marks the third time that Carr Pro Rodeo saddle bronc Coffee Bean has been selected to buck at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

This year marks the third time that Carr Pro Rodeo saddle bronc Coffee Bean has been selected to buck at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

17-year-old bay mare
Saddle Bronc Riding

This year
Seth Schafer scored 83 points to share the title at the West of the Pecos (Texas) Rodeo.

Jacobs Crawley posted an 83 to finish in a tie for fifth place at the Eagle County (Colo.) Fair and Rodeo.

J.J. Elshere was 82 in Lovington, N.M., to finish third at the Lea County Fair and Rodeo, a Silver Tour event.

 —————–

“She’s been to the finals two times before,” said Pete Carr, owner of Carr Pro Rodeo. “This year, she threw off Bradley Harter at the rodeo in Omaha (Neb.). She got Cody DeMoss pretty good at the NFR in 2006, throwing him off; he hurt his back pretty good and didn’t get to compete anymore.”

“They do pretty well on that horse. She has a big jump out of there, then she just bucks. I bought her from another stock contractor in 2005 and she has been one of our most consistent horses we have hauled.”

postheadericon Empty Pockets

7-year-old bay gelding
Saddle Bronc Riding
SIRE:
IV Empty Saddles
DAM:
High Plains

This year
Luke Butterfield scored 82 points to finish in a tie for fifth place at the Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo.

Samuel Kelts had an 83 to finish in a tie for fifth place at the Eagle County (Colo.) Fair and Rodeo.

Louie Brunson posted a 77 to finish in a tie for eighth place in Lovington, N.M.

—————–

“He was bought as a stud from Brian and Dennis Gifford of Rozet, Wyo., at a bucking horse sale in Cody, Wyo.,” said Pete Carr, owner of Carr Pro Rodeo. “His half-sister is Wasp of Stace Smith’s, which has been to the finals six or seven times.

“He is still a little nervous in there, but he kicks the lights out every jump, He’s been cut, hauled and now headed to Vegas this year. That’s throwing one into the grease; we will see how he handles everything pretty quick.”

postheadericon Saddle Bronc: Miss Congeniality

This isn’t the Powder River Rodeo mare, but the Carr Pro Rodeo mare by the same name:

9-year-old bay mare
Saddle Bronc Riding
SIRE:
Bandito
DAM:
One Eyed Sally

2010 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo
J.J. Elshere scored 85.5 points in the second round to finish in a tie for second place.

This year
Kobyn Williams posted a 76 to place in a tie for eight place at the West of the Pecos (Texas) Rodeo.

Taos Muncy was 84 points to finish in a tie for second, and Jesse Wright was 82 to finish in a tie for seventh at the Eagle County (Colo.) Fair and Rodeo.

Cody Angland had an 85 for first, and Alex Wright was 84 for second at the Lea County (N.M.) Fair and Rodeo.

2010
Cody Taton won the Silverton (Texas) Buck Wild Days rodeo 87 points

Alex Wright scored 85 to finish third at the West of the Pecos Rodeo in Texas, while Bradley Harter’s 83 on Miss Congeniality finished in a tie for fourth

Cort Scheer scored 85 points to finish in a tie for second place at the Guymon (Okla.) Pioneer Days Rodeo.

She was the bucking horse of the Canadian Finals Rodeo and they won three out of four rounds that she was there.

—————–

“The bronc riders really like her,” said Pete Carr, owner of Carr Pro Rodeo. “They say she is a better indoor horse. Most of our rodeos are outdoors, and she has been really good. I’m anxious to see her go in the Thomas & Mack.

“This horse had a very good year, so it’s no shock to me they selected her to the finals again. They won first and second on her in Lovington this year. She might be one of the most rider-friendly horses we own in the arena, but don’t get in front of her in the back pens because she will smoke you.”

postheadericon Animal magnitism: Time Out

Chandler Bownds rides Carr Pro Rodeo's Time Out for 87 points to win the Silver Tour event at the Lea County Fair and Rodeo. (PRCA PRORODEO PHOTO BY DUDLEY BARKER)

Chandler Bownds rides Carr Pro Rodeo's Time Out for 87 points to win the Silver Tour event at the Lea County Fair and Rodeo. (PRCA PRORODEO PHOTO BY DUDLEY BARKER)

Over the next few days, I will be posting information about some of the greatest bucking livestock in ProRodeo, all part of Dallas-based Carr Pro Rodeo. These are great athletes, and they’re a major part of the equation when it comes to the three roughstock events, bareback riding, saddle bronc riding and bull riding.

The first is a young bull, Time Out:

4 years old
Bull Riding
SIRE:
461 Mexican Standoff
DAM: Kaangiesser cow 904

This year
Jacob O’Mara rode Time Out for 87 points to win the quarterfinal round at the All American ProRodeo Finals.

Chandler Bownds scored 87 points to win the Lea County Fair and Rodeo, a Silver Tour event in Lovington, N.M. The victory is just on reason why the young bull rider has qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo for the first time in his career.

“I bought that bull this year from bull rider Cooper Kanngiesser, and he’s been really good,” said Pete Carr, owner of Carr Pro Rodeo. “The bull riders seem to like him a lot.”

“Pete needed some good bulls at the time,” said Kanngiesser, a 2006 qualifier to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. “In years past, I haven’t kept very many bulls past 3 (years of age), so I put a package deal together.

“As far as him being selected to the NFR, I thought he deserved it. It made me feel good, because there were people who kept telling me he was just a bull, but I knew he had more to him. I had one producer who bought him twice and had me buy him back because he didn’t think that bull had anything in it. I sold him to Pete Carr, who knew what to do with him, and the bull makes the NFR in his first year. It’s bittersweet for me.”

postheadericon A thankful life

Over the last few days, I’ve published 10 stories about the 2011 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. That is just the tip of the iceberg on what I’m going to post on TwisTED Rodeo.

On this Thanksgiving, I’m quite thankful for so many brilliant opportunities. I’m blessed with tremendous friends, a loving family who supports me and the chance to live my dreams. I’m thankful for you, the ones who read this website; I hope you keep coming back and find it a wonderful place to get your rodeo news.

Of course, none of this is possible without my faith in Jesus Christ.

In a week, I’ll be elbow deep in the NFR and all the things that go with it. I’m looking forward to it. Until then, I’ll cherish the moments I have with my wife and girls, thankful for them and all they bring to my life.

Happy Thanksgiving to you, and thanks for stopping by.

postheadericon Glause mature beyond his years heading to his 3rd NFR

LAS VEGAS – When Seth Glause first rolled into this southern Nevada city for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, he was a wide-eyed, 20-year-old kid who wasn’t quite sure what to expect.

Already he was one of the best bull riders in the business. That was 2008, and Glause was coming off a great sophomore season at Central Wyoming College in Riverton, where he was the Central Rocky Mountain Region’s all-around champion and a bull riding qualifier to the College National Finals Rodeo.

Seth Glause

Seth Glause

The lights of Las Vegas were especially bright, but Glause was where he needed to be: ProRodeo’s championship event. He returns this year for the third time in his young career, ready to tame the wildest bucking beasts in the business with the skills God gave him and the fortitude to battle through whatever obstacles come his way.

Oh, and still he’s only 23.

“It’s been my goal to qualify for the NFR since I was a kid,” said Glause, of Rock Springs, Wyo. “For it to happen three times is pretty special to me.”

That’s a brief description of the magnitude of the NFR, which takes just the top 15 contestants on the money list in each event at the conclusion of the regular season and provides them with the biggest purse they’ll experience all year, $6 million paid out over 10 days. Glause will test his mettle against 14 other elite bull riders in a rugged challenge against the most celebrated, athletic bulls in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association.

His goal, though, is to collect as much of that multi-million prize pool as possible, and he’ll have plenty of opportunities. Go-round winners will earn a check for $17,885 each of the 10 nights, and the contestant with the best cumulative time or score at the conclusion of the marathon event will ad an additional $45,865 for being crowned the average winner. It’s exciting and mind-boggling all at the same time.

“The first grand entry into that building is the most memorable experience out there,” Glause said. “I just can’t wait to get out there, do my job and hopefully walk away with quite a bit of money.”

Glause earned the right to compete in ProRodeo’s grand championship by finishing the regular season eighth in the world standings with $75,473. He won three big rodeos – in Lawton, Okla.; Guymon, Okla.; and Colorado Springs, Colo. – to earn some significant paychecks, but he punched his ticket to the NFR by placing high at several other events. The $5,650 he won in Lawton was great, but so was the $1,665 from Lovington, N.M., that same week.

“I had a good start to the season,” he said. “I won some at Denver, Fort Worth (Texas) and San Antone. It seemed like it quieted off there about the Fourth of July, but then it went all right from there.”

It’s a mind-mannered approach to a rock star lifestyle – when you tie your hand to a 1,800-pound bull for a living, you are living on the edge. Of course, it helps when you’re pretty good at it, and Glause is.

“He’s just a heck of a hand,” said Craig Latham, rodeo coach at Oklahoma Panhandle State University, where Glause attended one year on a rodeo scholarship. “I’ve known him since he was growing up. After he was done at Central Wyoming, I wanted him to come down and finish his four-year degree and rodeo with us.

“He rides broncs as good or better than he rides bulls. He team ropes, too. I like those cowboys who can work both ends of the arena, and Seth was one of those for us for sure.”

Bronc riding comes quite naturally to Glause, whose father, Tom, was a saddle bronc rider who serves as a municipal court judge in Rock Springs and is the coordinator for the PRCA’s Mountain States Circuit.

“I got on my first steer when I was 4 or 5, but I had some help,” said Seth Glause, who credits his relationship with Wyoming Tourism, Excel Drilling and B Tuff jeans for helping him handle the business side of rodeo. “Dad held on to me, and another guy held on to the steer’s tail. I got bucked off.

“But I was good from there.”

A rodeo career was born, but those who know the Glause family knew it was bound to happen.

“I used to travel with Tom,” said Latham, a nine-time NFR qualifier in saddle bronc riding. “I rodeoed with J.D. Hamaker and Tom when I was on my permit. Those guys took pretty good care of me.”

That led to Latham’s recruitment of the younger Glause, who had already competed at the NFR by the time he arrived in Goodwell, Okla.

“Seth is a great kid and a great athlete,” Latham said. “I’d say his strengths are, bottom line, try … there’s no quit in him, and there’s just try every time he gets the chance.”

That’s a key ingredient in the development of a champion. Glause is in the mix to chase the 2011 bull riding gold buckle, but he’s got a long ways to go – he trails world standings leader Shane Proctor by $96,285. It’s not the first time Glause has faced an incredible challenge.

“I’ve heard that stuff growing up about being too tall to ride bulls,” said Glause, listed at 6-foot, 170 pounds, about five inches taller than the average bull rider. “I think it goes back to one of my strengths, that all those people who called me too tall were just motivating me to prove them wrong.”

And now he hopes to proof all those doubters wrong during his 10 nights of competition in the City of Lights.

“It’s what you work toward all year long,” he said. “You want to make the finals, trying to win a world title. It’s just great that it’s right there in front of you.”