Archive for October, 2015

postheadericon Dirty Jacket repeats as champ

DALLAS – When Dirty Jacket walks into the bucking chutes, all eyes are upon him.

The talented Pete Carr Pro Rodeo horse is big and muscular, powerful and athletic. At 11 years old, the bay gelding knows why he’s there, and he’s ready to perform. He’s the greatest bucking horse in ProRodeo, and everybody in the place is ready to watch him.

Dirty Jacket is the Bareback Horse of the Year in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association for the second straight season. He is joined by Carr’s Half Nutz, which was voted as the reserve runner-up Bull of the Year.

Pete Carr Pro Rodeo's Dirty Jacket has earned the PRCA Bareback Horse of the Year honors each of the past two seasons. He has been recognized as one of the top three bareback horses each of the past four years. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Dirty Jacket has earned the PRCA Bareback Horse of the Year honors each of the past two seasons. He has been recognized as one of the top three bareback horses each of the past four years. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

“There’s not another horse like him,” said Richmond Champion, a 2014 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifier who has scored three victories on the bucking horse over the last 16 months; he was 91 points to win the Cheyenne (Wyo.) Frontier Days and 88.5 points to win the fifth NFR round a season ago, then followed that with a 90-point ride to win Eagle, Colo., this past July.

“The only bad thing is when you get the whistle, you don’t want to stop.”

Champion is not the only bareback rider who thinks that way. They have voted Dirty Jacket as one of the top three bucking horses each of the past four years: He finished third in the 2012 voting and was second in ’13.

Over his career, Dirty Jacket has led dozens of cowboys to victories, including five big titles in the past year. In addition to Champion’s Round 5 win, Dirty Jacket also was the driving force for Caleb Bennett’s victory in the 10th round of the 2014 NFR.

Jessy Davis had the highest marked ride on the talented gelding in February, when he posted a 93 in the San Angelo (Texas) Cinch Shootout. Winn Ratliff followed with a 90-point ride to share the title in Weatherford, Texas, in mid-June, and Ryan Gray spurred Dirty Jacket for 92 points two weeks later in Pecos, Texas; Gray’s ride is the highest-marked bareback ride during the 2015 regular season.

“He’s just a great animal,” said Gray, an eight-time NFR qualifier. “You can guarantee he’s going to perform at his best every time. He’s going to give you a chance to win first; that’s the neat thing about that horse.”

Dirty Jacket will make his seventh straight appearance at the NFR during the 2015 championship, set for Dec. 2-13 in Las Vegas. Since he first bucked inside the Thomas & Mack Center in 2009, he has been featured in the fifth and 10th go-rounds, which are recognized for having the most electric and amazing bucking stock of ProRodeo’s championship event.

Half Nutz is the reserve runner-up Bull of the Year in 2015 and will return to the NFR for the second straight year. (PRCA PRORODEO PHOTO BY MIKE COPEMAN)

Half Nutz is the reserve runner-up Bull of the Year in 2015 and will return to the NFR for the second straight year. (PRCA PRORODEO PHOTO BY MIKE COPEMAN)

“Dirty Jacket is a bareback rider’s dream,” Ratliff said. “He has a lot of timing when he bucks; when a horse has a lot of timing, it’s easy for us to get in rhythm with him and be flashy. You get to show what the style of bareback riding is all about, and you get to show out.

“He has to love it, and Pete’s not afraid to buck him. If a contractor’s not afraid to buck a horse, it tells a lot about the character of the horse. He’s always a phenomenal horse.”

It takes something special for an animal to continue to perform at a high level. Take Half Nutz, a 5-year-old black, white-faced bull that was named one of the top three in ProRodeo based on votes by the bull riders.

Over the course of his career, Half Nutz has been ridden just one time, but that was one of the top-marked rides of 2015. Scottie Knapp matched moves with the talented bull for 93 points to win the West of the Pecos (Texas) Rodeo in late June. Half Nutz will perform at the NFR for the second straight year.

“He’s definitely a round-winner and the real deal,” Knapp said. “If I had one to pick, that’d be the one.

“Even after I rode him, he’s still a bucker. That’s where you find your true bucking bulls, the ones that keep bucking that well even after they’ve been rode. That’s what we’re looking for if you want to win.”

Half Nutz is one of several top bulls that are part of the Carr herd. In fact, he will be among 22 Carr animals performing at the 2015 NFR, the highest number of NFR bucking stock among all PRCA stock contractors.

“I love Pete’s pen of bulls,” Knapp said. “When I go to his rodeos, I know 95 percent of the time I’ve drawn something to win on. He’s always got a solid pen of bulls. His pen always seems to be even, top-of-the-line buckers. You know when you go to his rodeos, if you ride you know you’re fixing to get a big check.”

postheadericon Fast run propels Quaney to title

DUNCAN, Okla. – Cody Quaney knew he had to be fast on Saturday during the final night of the 2015 Prairie Circuit season.

He was, and it paid off in a big way for the tie-down roper from Cheney, Kan. Quaney roped and tied his calf in 8.4 seconds to win the third round of the Chisholm Trail Ram Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo. More importantly, his earnings inside the Stephens County Arena pushed him to the circuit’s year-end championship.

“It was really big, because it determined whether I won the year-end award or not,” said Quaney, now in his third year in ProRodeo.

Cody Quaney

Cody Quaney

In all, the Kansas cowboy pocketed $3,089 in Duncan and upended nine-time circuit champion Jerome Schneeberger of Ponca City, Okla., for the championship by less than $2,000.

“I did really good at the first of the year, and then I was gone to the Northwest during the August and September run,” Quaney said. “Jerome caught me then and had about an $1,100 lead, and I was able to catch him at the finals.”

The victory secures his first big championship in his Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association career. More importantly, it qualifies Quaney to the Ram National Circuit Finals Rodeo, which will take place next spring in Kissimmee, Fla. He will be joined there by the average champion, Cole Bailey of Okmulgee, Okla., who roped and tied three calves in a cumulative time of 25.5 seconds to win the average championship.

For his mark, Quaney finished third in the average.

“It’s a big deal, because it gives me a lot of confidence going into next year,” he said. “I’m not known for winning a whole lot of rodeos, so it was good to get this year-end award.”

The 2008 Cheney High School graduate moved on to college rodeo at Vernon (Texas) College and Southwestern Oklahoma State University in Weatherford, Okla. Not only did he win the title made up of contestants and events primarily in the Oklahoma-Kansas-Nebraska region, he also finished 29th in the final world standings.

Though he spends a good portion of the winter near Dallas, he’s quite comfortable competing in his home circuit.

“This is where I’m from, so I’ll keep coming back,” Quaney said.

Chisholm Trail Ram Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo
Oct. 15-17
Duncan, Okla.
Bareback riding:
First round: 1. Caine Riddle, 80 points on New Frontier Rodeo’s Elvis, $1,365; 2. Blaine Kaufman, 79, $1,324; 3. Frank Morton, 76, $883; 4. (tie) Logan Patterson and Zachary Hibler, 73, $221 each. Second round: 1. Caine Riddle, 80 points Beutler & Son Rodeo’s Miss Zandy, $1,765; 2. (tie) Wyatt Clark, Brian Leddy and Frank Morton, 71, $883. Third round: 1. Caine Riddle, 84 points on Frontier Rodeo’s Cross Fire, $1,765; 2. Blaine Kaufman, 79, $1,324; 3. Brody Cooper, 72, $883; 4. Frank Morton, 71, $441. Average: 1. Caine Riddle, 244 points on three rides, $2,748; 2. Blaine Kaufman, 228, $1,986; 3. Frank Morton, 218, $1,324; 4. Brian Leddy, 207, $662. Year-end champion: Caine Riddle.

Steer wrestling: First round: 1. Stockton Graves, 3.7 seconds, $1,765; 2. Riley Duvall, 4.2, $1,324; 3. Cole Edge, 4.4, $883; 4. Dean Gorsuch, 4.7, $441. Second round: 1. Cole Edge, 3.9 seconds, $1,765; 2. Clay Mindemann, 4.0, $1,324; 3. (tie) Tanner Brunner and Dru Melvin, 4.1, $662 each. Third round: 1. Jule Hazen, 3.5 seconds, $1,865; 2. (tie) Dean Gorsuch and Stockton Graves, 4.0, $1,103 each; 4. Ryan Swayze, 4.4, $441. Average: 1. Stockton Graves, 12.4 seconds on three runs, $2,648; 2. Riley Duvall, 13.8, $1,986; 3. Cole Edge, 14.0, $1,324; 4. Tanner Brunner, 14.8, $662. Year-end champion: Stockton Graves.

Team roping: First round: 1. Coleman Proctor/Jake Long, 5.6 seconds, $1,765; 2. Jesse Stipes/Billie Jack Saebens, 6.3, $1,324; 3. Mike Bacon/Joseph Harrison, 6.4, $883; 4. (tie) Jason Arndt/Austin Rogers and Hunter Munsell/Sawyer Barham, 6.7, $221 each. Second round: 1. Brandon Vaske/Braden Harmon, 5.2 seconds, $1,765; 2. Andrew Ward/ReaganWard, 5.3, $1,324; 3. Coleman Proctor/Jake Long, 5.8, $883; 4. (tie) Troy Boone/Dawson McMaster and Zac Small/Tyler Worley, $221 each. Third round: 1. Andrew Ward/Reagan Ward, 5.7 seconds, $1,765; 2. Jesse Stipes/Billie Jack Staebens, 6.2, $1,324; 3. Colt Braden/Chad Evans, 6.5, $883; 4. Coleman Proctor/Jake Long, 6.6, $441. Average: 1. Coleman Proctor/Jake Long, 18.0 seconds on three runs, $2,648; 2. Jesse Stipes/Billie Jack Saebens, 20.3, $1,986; 3. Zac Small/Tyler Worley, 27.3, $1,324; 4. Colt Braden/Chad Evans, 30.4, $662.

Saddle bronc riding: First round: 1. Jesse James Kirby, 82 points on New Frontier Rodeo’s Satin Sheets, $1,765; 2. Joe Lufkin, 80, $1,324; 3. (tie) Ryan Bestol and Shade Etbauer, 77, $662 each. Second round: 1. (tie) Shade Etbauer, on Rafter H Rodeo’s Roan Alone, and Steven Dent, on Rafter H Rodeo’s Pocket Money, 78, $1,545 each; 3. Joe Lufkin, 77, $883; 4. Ryan Bestol, 76, $441. Third round: 1. Preston Kafka, 74 points on Frontier Rodeo’s War Eagle, $1,765; 2. Ryan Bestol, 73, $1,324; 3. Roper Kiesner, 69, $883; 4. Steven Dent, 63, $441. Average: 1. Ryan Bestol, 226 points on three rides, $2,648; 2. Steven Dent, 207, $1,986; 3. Preston Kafka, 204, $1,324; 4. Joe Lufkin, 157 points on two rides, $662.

Tie-down roping: First round: 1. (tie) Tyler Mathew Milligan and Cole Bailey, 7.6 seconds, $1,545; 3. Bryson Sechrist, 7.7, $883; 4. (tie) Cole Wilson and Trell Ebauer, 8.1, $221 each. Second round: 1. Caleb Bullock, 7.8 seconds, $1,765; 2. Caddo Lewallen, 8.1, $1,324; 3. Cole Bailey, 8.8, $883; 4. Trent Creager, 8.9, $441. Third round: 1. Cody Quaney, 8.4 seconds, $1,765; 2. Tyler Milligan, 9.0, $1,324; 3. Cole Bailey, 9.1, $883; 4. L.D. Meier, 11.2, $441. Average: 1. Cole Bailey, 26.5 seconds on three runs, $2,648; 2. Tyler Milligan, 26.5, $1,986; 3. Cody Quaney, 27.5, $1,324; 4. Cole Wilson, 29.1, $662. Year-end champion: Cody Quaney.

Barrel racing: First round: 1. Shy-Anne Jarrett, 16.30 seconds, $1,788; 2. (tie) Mary Burger and Lauren Magdeburg, 16.32, $1,117 each; 4. Kim Couch, 16.56, $447. Second round: 1. Ari-Anna Flynn, 16.22 seconds, $1,787; 2. Jeanne Anderson, 16.23, $1,341; 3. Lauren Magdeburg, 16.32, $894; 4. Kara Large, 16.35, $447. Third round: 1. Emily Miller, 16.24 seconds, $1,788; 2. Kim Couch, 16.31, $1,341; 3. Kara Large, 16.33, $894; 4. Mary Burger, 13.42, $447. Average: 1. Mary Burger, 49.18 seconds on three runs, $2,681; 2. Lauren Magdeburg, 49.30, $2,011; 3. Kim Couch, 49.44, $1,341; 4. Tracy Nowlin, 49.75, $670. Year-end champion: Kim Couch.

Steer roping: First round: 1. Rocky Patterson, 11.1 seconds, $1,618; 2. Chet Herren, 12.5, $1,213; 3. Ralph Williams, 12.7, $809; 4. Roger Branch, 13.1, $404. Second round: 1. Mike Chase, 10.3 seconds, $1,618; 2. Rod Hartness, 11.0, $1,213; 3. Brad Starks, 11.4, $809; 4. Ralph Williams, 11.6, $404. Third round: 1. J.P. Wickett, 9.7 seconds, $1,618; 2. (tie) Shorty Garten, and Brad Mohon, 10.5, $1,011 each; 4. Rocky Patterson, 11.4, $404.

Bull riding: First round: 1. Chris McCombs, 81 points on Silver Creek Rodeo’s Crabby Abby, $1,765; 2. Trevor Kastner, 80, $1,324; no other qualified rides. Second round: 1. Tate Stratton, 78 points on Rafter H Rodeo’s Never Been Kissed, $1,765; no other qualified rides. Third round: 1. Jake Gowdy, 82 points on Beutler & Son Rodeo’s South Point Style, $1,765; 2. Trevor Kastner, 56, $1,324; no other qualified rides. Average: 1. Trevor Kastner, 136 points on two rides, $2,648; 2. Jake Gowdy, 82 points on one ride, $1,986; 3. Chris McCombs, 81, $1,324; 4. Tate Stratton, 78, $662. Year-end champion: Jake Gowdy.

postheadericon Riddle answers with winning

DUNCAN, Okla. – Caine Riddle hasn’t been on a bucking horse in a month and a half, but it hasn’t shown through the first two rounds of the Chisholm Trail Ram Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo.

Riddle, a four-time Prairie Circuit year-end champion from Vernon, Texas, won the opening bareback riding rounds and added $3,531 to his earnings, padding his lead with one night remaining in the season.

Caine Riddle

Caine Riddle

“I had Miss Zandy tonight, and I’ve been on that horse eight times over the last 10 years,” Riddle said Friday after posting an 80-point ride on the Beutler & Son Rodeo Co. horse. “I’ve been successful on her nearly every time. I don’t know if it’s that I’m getting old or what, but tonight was the buckiest trip I’ve ever had on her.

“I could dang sure tell she was dropping out of the air, so I just kept hustling and it worked out good.”

With his quick start, Riddle moved ever closer to his fifth circuit championship. If so, it would mark the fourth straight year he’s claimed the title. Yes, he’s been rather dominant in the region, but he needs to have a solid finish to the three-day finale on Saturday night to secure another crown.

“I knew toward the end of the season that there were a couple of young guys, Blaine Kauffman and Frank Morton, were right there close,” Riddle said of the Nos. 2 and 3 bareback riders in the standings heading into this weekend. “I don’t pay attention to that; I just go ride every one the best I can. I know if you ride all three of them here and don’t mess up, you’ll get a pretty good check and be successful.”

It’s worked out for the 32-year-old cowboy. He has been on the verge of qualifying for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, which features only the top 15 contestants in each event in the world standings. Three of the past four years, he was among the top 20, just missing out on the NFR.

“I love riding bucking horses, so I’ll keep going as long as I’m good and healthy,” he said. “I think I’m getting to the age where I can’t get on 150 horses a year, but there are a lot of good rodeos in our circuit.”

It also helps that he’s part of a big rodeo family, the Beutlers of Elk City, Okla. His uncle, Bennie, and cousin, Rhett, own Beutler & Son, which produces several events in the region that is made up of events and contestants primarily in Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska.

“I love going to Bennie’s rodeos,” Riddle said. “He’s got probably the best string of bareback horses in the PRCA. If you enter his rodeos, you’re going to get on something that bucks. As long as I’m healthy and can ride his horses, then I think I can ride anybody’s.”

NOTES: Three-time world champion Rocky Patterson of Pratt, Kan., won the circuit finals steer roping championship on Friday morning. He roped and tied three steers in a cumulative time of 35.5 seconds to win the title, collecting $4,448 in the process.

Chisholm Trail Ram Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo
Oct. 15-17
Duncan, Okla.
Second Round
Bareback riding:
1. Caine Riddle, 80 points Beutler & Son Rodeo’s Miss Zandy, $1,765; 2. (tie) Wyatt Clark, Brian Leddy and Frank Morton, 71, $883.

Steer wrestling: 1. Cole Edge, 3.9 seconds, $1,765; 2. Clay Mindemann, 4.0, $1,324; 3. (tie) Tanner Brunner and Dru Melvin, 4.1, $662 each

Team roping: 1. Brandon Vaske/Braden Harmon, 5.2 seconds, $1,765; 2. Andrew Ward/ReaganWard, 5.3, $1,324; 3. Coleman Proctor/Jake Long, 5.8, $883; 4. (tie) Troy Boone/Dawson McMaster and Zac Small/Tyler Worley, $221 each.

Saddle bronc riding: 1. (tie) Shade Etbauer, on Rafter H Rodeo’s Roan Alone, and Steven Dent, on Rafter H Rodeo’s Pocket Money, 78, $1,545 each; 3. Joe Lufkin, 77, $883; 4. Ryan Bestol, 76, $441.

Tie-down roping: 1. Caleb Bullock, 7.8 seconds, $1,765; 2. Caddo Lewallen, 8.1, $1,324; 3. Cole Bailey, 8.8, $883; 4. Trent Creager, 8.9, $441.

Barrel racing: 1. Ari-Anna Flynn, 16.22 seconds, $1,787; 2. Jeanne Anderson, 16.23, $1,341; 3. Lauren Magdeburg, 16.32, $894; 4. Kara Large, 16.35, $447.

Steer roping: First round: 1. Rocky Patterson, 11.1 seconds, $1,618; 2. Chet Herren, 12.5, $1,213; 3. Ralph Williams, 12.7, $809; 4. Roger Branch, 13.1, $404. Second round: 1. Mike Chase, 10.3 seconds, $1,618; 2. Rod Hartness, 11.0, $1,213; 3. Brad Starks, 11.4, $809; 4. Ralph Williams, 11.6, $404. Third round: 1. J.P. Wickett, 9.7 seconds, $1,618; 2. (tie) Shorty Garten, and Brad Mohon, 10.5, $1,011 each; 4. Rocky Patterson, 11.4, $404. Average: 1. Rocky Patterson, 35.5 seconds on three head, $2,426; 2. Mike Chase, 22.6 on two head, $1,820; 3. J.P. Wickett, 22.9, $1,213; 4. Shorty Garten, 24.1, $607.

Bull riding: 1. Tate Stratton, 78 points on Rafter H Rodeo’s Never Been Kissed, $1,765; no other qualified rides.

postheadericon Cooper returning to the NFR

So many things have changed since Jake Cooper first qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

That was in 2007, when he was just 23 years old. Though he’d been around the sport his entire life, he was still relatively new to the ups and downs that come with competing in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association.

“I had been rodeoing for about three years, and I felt like I was going to go back to the NFR every year,” said Cooper, whose father, Jimmie, was the 1981 world champion all-around cowboy and a 2005 inductee into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame. “I kind of took it for granted.

Jake Cooper

Jake Cooper

“After not going back for a long time and struggling a little, it’s way sweeter this time, and I’m sure going to enjoy it. Even though I’m going to continue rodeoing, you never know when you’re going to make it.”

When Jake Cooper arrives in Las Vegas for the 10-night finale, he’ll be the No. 6 header in the world standings. Only the top 15 contestants in each discipline from the regular season advance to the NFR, so earning a trip to the Nevada desert in December is quite an accomplishment.

Raised in the southeastern New Mexico community of Monument, Cooper has had a rope in his hand since a young age. He still claims Monument as his home, and he’s happy to be one of just two New Mexico cowboys battling for gold buckles – he is joined by fellow Tate Branch Auto Group cowboy Taos Muncy of Corona, N.M.

“Besides lessening the financial burden that comes with rodeo, just having a guy that looks you in the eye and you know believes in me, it’s a cool feeling,” Cooper said of his relationship with Tate Branch, who owns the dealerships in the southeastern New Mexico communities of Carlsbad, Artesia and Hobbs. “I text him throughout the year to keep him updated.

“He’s always offering some encouragement. It’s nice to have someone that has your back.”

That’s part of rodeo, in general, but it’s especially viable in team roping, the only tandem discipline in the sport. As a header, Cooper entrusted most of the cleanup duty to his heeler, Tyler McKnight of Wells, Texas.

“The only thing that kept him from making the NFR was when he got hurt for a month in February,” Cooper said, noting that McKnight finished 17th in the heeling standings, just two spots out of qualifying for the finale. “I roped with other people and got more money won than him.

“I was very upset about it. I thought he had got it done in California that final week of the season.”

Cooper earned nearly $81,000 in 2015, about $15,000 more than McKnight. During the 10-night championship in December in Las Vegas, Cooper will rope with Russell Cardoza, a four-time NFR qualifier from Terrebonne, Ore.; he roped a good portion of the season with Dustin Bird, who also finished outside the top 15.

“I probably haven’t roped with Russell since I was 17 or 18 and some of the junior deals,” Cooper said. “Anytime you can go with a guy that’s been there and has that experience, it’s going to help. He’s such a cool dude that it doesn’t look like anything ever bothers him. I’m really excited to have a chance to rope with him out there.”

Roping with great cowboys is nothing new to the New Mexico-born cowboy. Not only did he grow up competing with his father, long considered one of the top timed-event hands in the game, but he also roped with his twin brother, Jim Ross, a five-time NFR qualifier. In fact, the brothers roped together during that magical run eight seasons ago.

“I would hope I’m a lot smarter than I was the first time I made it,” Jake Cooper said. “The bottom line is I’m much more appreciative of the chance to get to rope out there. I see now how many guys work hard at this and don’t make it, so I feel like I need to appreciate it as much as I can. It feels like all my hard work has paid off the last few years.”

It’s been an excellent 2015 season for Cooper. He hopes to parlay a solid run into the sport’s richest 10 days ever. That means focusing on the little things to make big things happen.

“My main goal is to just rope like I know how,” he said. “We’ve been practicing hard. I’m not going to rope to the time. I feel like I’m fast enough when I do my job, so I want to do my job every night.

“I don’t want to try to be too fast. My goal is to be mistake-free. If I do my job every night, then I’ll let the chips fall and see what happens from there.”

That’s what Vegas is all about, especially in December.

postheadericon Long, Proctor extend their lead

DUNCAN, Okla. – Jake Long and Coleman Proctor both own Prairie Circuit titles, though the team ropers didn’t earn them together or in the same year.

They are trying to do just that in 2015, and they made a stronger case Thursday night during the opening go-round of the Chisholm Trail Ram Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo. Proctor, a header from Pryor, Okla., and Long, a heeler from Coffeyville, Kan., stopped the clock in 5.6 seconds to win the round and add $1,765 to their season earnings.

Coleman Proctor

Coleman Proctor

“I feel like I’ve got a really good horse, so I just try to use him and then use Jake, because Jake heels really good,” said Proctor, who won the circuit finals average championship a year ago while roping with Billie Saebens. “I wanted to catch the steer and set him up so Jake can heel him fast. I feel blessed to have a great job heading for Jake.”

Proctor first won a Prairie Circuit year-end title in 2004 in heeling, then Long followed that four years later. They return to the three-day championship together for the first time in about seven years.

Jake Long

Jake Long

“This is the first time I’ve competed at the circuit finals in Duncan,” Long said. “I had a hard time getting (a minimum) 15 (circuit) rodeos. Last year I went to some and just didn’t qualify; this year it’s fun to be back.”

The momentum certainly is there. In addition to an increased purse in Duncan – for winning the round, Proctor and Long pocketed $1,765 each – the tandem is hoping to clinch qualifications to the Ram National Circuit Finals Rodeo in Kissimmee, Fla., which features just the year-end and circuit-finals champs from each of the 12 ProRodeo regions.

“He heeled that like he was supposed to go to Disney World,” Proctor said, noting that Kissimmee is just 17 miles southeast of Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla.

It’s true. While the national circuit finals features a great purse for the contestants, there is more to draw Long and his family, including wife, Tasha, and their daughters, Haven and Haizlee.

“My wife and little girl want to go to Disney World, so it’s very important,” Long said with a laugh. “I have more pressure for that than trying to get out there to rope for some money.”

They still have some work to do over the two remaining rounds of the Chisholm Trail Ram Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo, which begins at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Proctor and Long extended their lead in the year-end standings; Proctor’s $14,564 is about $3,700 better than Zac Small of Welch, Okla., while Long’s $15,480 is $2,767 higher than Tyler Worley of Nawata, Okla.

“We came in the lead, and we’ve both won the year-end in heeling, but I’ve never won it heading,” Proctor said. “It’s special, so one more goal on my list is to win the Prairie Circuit heading one time.”

Chisholm Trail Ram Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo
Oct. 15-17
Duncan, Okla.
Bareback riding:
1. Caine Riddle, 80 points on New Frontier Rodeo’s Elvis, $1,365; 2. Blaine Kauffman, 79, $1,324; 3. Frank Morton, 76, $883; 4. (tie) Logan Patterson and Zachary Hibler, 73, $221 each.

Steer wrestling: 1. Stockton Graves, 3.7 seconds, $1,765; 2. Riley Duvall, 4.2, $1,324; 3. Cole Edge, 4.4, $883; 4. Dean Gorsuch, 4.7, $441.

Team roping: 1. Coleman Proctor/Jake Long, 5.6 seconds, $1,765; 2. Jesse Stipes/Billie Jack Saebens, 6.3, $1,324; 3. Mike Bacon/Joseph Harrison, 6.4, $883; 4. (tie) Jason Arndt/Austin Rogers and Hunter Munsell/Sawyer Barham, 6.7, $221 each.

Saddle bronc riding: 1. Jesse James Kirby, 82 points on New Frontier Rodeo’s Satin Sheets, $1,765; 2. Joe Lufkin, 80, $1,324; 3. (tie) Ryan Bestol and Shade Etbauer, 77, $662 each.

Tie-down roping: 1. (tie) Tyler Mathew Milligan and Cole Bailey, 7.6 seconds, $1,545; 3. Bryson Sechrist, 7.7, $883; 4. (tie) Cole Wilson and Trell Ebauer, 8.1, $221 each.

Barrel racing: 1. Shy-Anne Jarrett, 16.30 seconds, $1,788; 2. (tie) Mary Burger and Lauren Magdeburg, 16.32, $1,117 each; 4. Kim Couch, 16.56, $447.

Bull riding: 1. Chris McCombs, 81 points on Silver Creek Rodeo’s Crabby Abby, $1,765; 2. Trevor Kastner, 80, $1,324; no other qualified rides.

postheadericon Wall wins 2015 Pendleton Round-Up

EDITOR’S NOTE: This story was written for the October issue of Women’s Pro Rodeo News, the official publication of the WPRA. It is reprinted here with permission from the editor.

Even though she has just a handful of runs inside the Pendleton (Ore) Round-Up Stadium, Kimmie Wall knows that’s her favorite rodeo.

She further cemented that fact in mid-September, the only cowgirl to post two times in less than 29 seconds to clinch the Round-Up title and add $10,563 to her annual earnings. It moved her from 27th firmly into the top 20. Just as importantly, it provided her with a grand opportunity to cash in with her first Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualification as she began the final week of the 2015 regular season.

“I’m kind of speechless about it,” said Wall, who lives near Roosevelt, Utah. “It’s a bucket-list kind of rodeo to win, and you don’t know if it’s gone to happen. This is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. I was excited to be there just to compete, let alone to win the whole rodeo.”

Wall and her mount, TKW Bullys Famous Fox, won the opening round with a 28.59-second run, more than three-tenths of a second ahead of the runner-up, Tobi Richardson. Then the tandem followed that with a 28.74 in the Sept. 19 championship round, good enough for second place in the short round and the top spot in the two-run aggregate.

Kimmie Wall

Kimmie Wall

All this was in just the second year in which she’s competed on the famous grass in Pendleton, both on Foxy, a 7-year-old bay mare by Bullys Bullion and out of Gateway Ta Love, a Dash Ta Fame mare. Wall and Foxy also made the short round in 2014, where they finished fifth.

“For me, it’s strategy the whole time,” she said. “It’s a horse race. You’ve got to ride hard and never weaken. I keep Foxy in really good shape, even on the road. I didn’t have the opportunity to do anything special with her to get her ready, but I always keep her in good shape.”

It showed. In fact, it marked the first time in four years that the victor wasn’t Christy Loflin, who has utilized the long, grassy pattern en route to three straight Wrangler NFR qualifications.

“Movin is such an amazing animal,” Wall said of Loflin’s horse, Sheza Blazin Move. “Horses like Movin and Foxy love that pen there. It’s so much fun to let our horses do what they love.”

The Pendleton cloverleaf is the largest pattern in ProRodeo. The barrels are set up on the track that surrounds a grass infield, but the horses spend most of their time on the grass.

“I was excited to make it to the finals last year, and this year I was very excited to go back,” Wall said. “The atmosphere there is different than anywhere else. It’s really laid back. Everybody’s just on the grass, and they’re having a good time. It’s even more fun when it’s the end of the year and the tensions are high.

“I truly believe Pendleton is a make-it-or-break-it rodeo for those of us on the bubble. It can put you in there or take you out of it. I think now it’s a reality for me to jump up there (in the standing) and hopefully at least have a chance.”

She still had the final week of rodeos to make that last-minute push to reach the top 15 to head to the Nevada desert in December.

“I’m just so proud of my horse,” she said. “I’ve trained and raised a horse that can win in all types of pens.”

Even though she’s a “barrel racing diva,” Foxy has all the ingredients to be a special mare. Though Wall and her husband, Travis, raised and trained her, there’s something in her blood that helps Foxy excel on the barrel pattern.

“She was born from barrel racing royalty,” Wall said. “Sometimes with these great horses, we don’t train them; they were born to do this.

“My children were as much a part of this as my husband and me. Foxy’s been a huge blessing to my family. She’s allowed us to live our dreams. It’s so great to have such a great athlete in our family. Our world really revolves around her right now.”

Foxy is ornery, Wall said, adding that the mare knows who she is and what she is. But the family deals with it because they know there’s a winner beating inside that heart.

“Foxy runs hard, and she turns hard,” she said. “She runs just as hard into the first barrel as she runs out of the pen. She turns barrels just as fast as she runs into the pen. I had a little bobble on my second barrel (in the Pendleton short round); I think we were running just entirely too fast going into that second barrel.

“She’s not a very big horse, but she can run as fast as those big horses. A lot of people think she’s a bigger horse than she is because she has such a big stride.”

That long stride made up ground in a hurry around the longest cloverleaf pattern in the WPRA ProRodeo season. But Foxy’s heart may be more telling.

“She runs 110 percent when she comes through that alleyway,” Wall said. “She’s also still young, so sometimes we get into situations with that. She always tries hard, no matter what. You don’t come across those kind every day.”

No, you don’t. The Walls know they have something special in Foxy. Now they’re capitalizing on it.

postheadericon Miller, Rangers win in Stillwater

ALVA, Okla. – Like every good athlete, Shayna Miller has brilliant aspirations.

Miller, a Northwestern Oklahoma State University senior from Faith, S.D., would like to be part of three Central Plains Region championships: Goat tying, the women’s all-around and the women’s team.

She and the Rangers women made a significant move toward those goals this past weekend at the Oklahoma State University rodeo in Stillwater, Okla. Northwestern won the team championship, while Miller earned the all-around crown while contributing points in both goat tying and breakaway roping.

Shayna Miller

Shayna Miller

“It was pretty exciting for me, because I’ve been having trouble making my short rounds work out,” said Miller, the reigning region goat-tying champion. “I’d do well in the long rounds, but I wasn’t getting it done in the short rounds.

“To get four runs put together was a pretty big deal to me.”

In all, Miller accounted for 190 of the Rangers 450 points, so she was far from alone. Elli Price of Leady, Okla., dominated the breakaway roping, winning both rounds and securing the aggregate title in Stillwater.

Miller, meanwhile, was one of three Northwestern goat-tiers in the championship round. After finishing tied for second in the opening round, she split the short-round victory and finished second overall. Tearnee Nelson of Faith finished fourth, while Laremi Allred of Kanarraville, Utah, placed sixth in the first round.

Elli Price

Elli Price

Barrel racer Sara Bynum of Beggs, Okla., placed third in the first round but a downed barrel in the final round took her out of a top spot in the average.

“After we won the region last year, we’re all kind of held up to higher expectations,” Miller said. “We’ve got to get things rolling. Hopefully it’s all turned around, and we can keep winning rodeos and win the region again.”

Through three events of the 2015-16 season, the Northwestern women sit second in the standings.

“I think we’re pretty solid,” Miller said. “We all have to do our part individually. At the rodeos and at practice, we can encourage each other, keep our heads on straight and take it one rodeo at a time.”

The Rangers men finished sixth overall in Stillwater but had a strong contingent in the championship round, especially in steer wrestling.

In fact, seven of the short-round qualifiers wore the Northwestern black vests, led by Joby Allen; he finished tied for fourth in the first round and was second in the short round to share the average victory with Cody Devers of Garden City (Kan.) Community College, both finishing in a two-run cumulative time of 8.8 seconds.

Allen and Devers were just one-tenth of a second faster in than Northwestern’s Jacob Edler of State Center, Iowa, who also leads the region standings. Maverick Harper of Stephenville, Texas, finished fourth, and Grayson Allred of Kanarraville, Utah, placed sixth. J.D. Stuxness of Appleton, Minn., and Ty Batie of Rapid City, S.D., both placed in the first round.

Meanwhile, team ropers Hunter Munsell of Arnett, Okla., and Sawyer Barham of Barnsdall, Okla., placed second in both rounds and the average, and tie-down roper Wade Perry of Lamont, Okla., finished third in his discipline.

“I think our matches help us a lot,” Miller said. “They put you in a position where you have to perform under pressure.”

That’s part of the plan laid by coach Stockton Graves and his staff as they prepare both the men’s and women’s teams for the rigors of the tough Central Plains Region.

“Stockton knows how to win,” she said. “He may not know a lot about goat tying, but he knows how to win and makes us feel good about ourselves and gets us pumped up about the weekend.”

It worked in Stillwater.

postheadericon Local cowgirl ready for finale

DUNCAN, Okla. – For years, Shy-Anne Jarrett stood in the background as the rodeo world shined its light on her husband, 2005 all-around world champion Ryan Jarrett.

The spotlight will beam brightly on the Comanche, Okla., cowgirl during the Chisholm Trail Ram Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo, set for 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 15-Saturday, Oct. 17, at the Stephens County Arena in Duncan.

For the second straight year, the former Shy-Anne Bowden has qualified for the regional finale, which features only the top 12 contestants in each event from cowboys, cowgirls and events primarily in Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska.

Shy-Anne Jarrett

Shy-Anne Jarrett

“I’ve rodeoed, but I never went that much,” she said, noting that she’s competed in barrel racing in ProRodeo for several years. “I’d just go to a handful of circuit rodeos. I’d get a little money won, and I’d usually take off with him. I wouldn’t go as much as I have the last two years.”

Ryan Jarrett has now qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo nine times, eight in tie-down roping. In 2005, he earned the trip to Las Vegas in both tie-down roping and steer wrestling, and he walked away from the Nevada desert with the most coveted prize in the game, the gold buckle awarded to the world champion all-around cowboy.

In fact, since 2002, he is the only man outside of 21-time champ Trevor Brazile to have earned that championship – Brazile owns 12 all-around titles, five in steer roping, three in tie-down roping and one in heading.

But Ryan failed to qualify for the Chisholm Trail Ram Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo in 2015, so all eyes will be on the local girl. Shy-Anne, the daughter of Billy Bob and Sandy Bowden, grew up in a rodeo family. Dad roped calves and has trained tie-down roping horses for years, while mom was a professional barrel racer, much like her daughter.

“She actually missed the finals in the late ’70s,” said Shy-Anne, who was raised in and still lives in Comanche, just eight miles from the Stephens County Arena. “After she had me, she trained futurity horses.

“Rodeo is just a way of life.”

Ryan Jarrett

Ryan Jarrett

That’s still the case. Shy-Anne has been riding horses since she was a toddler and began competing at about 5 years of age. It engrained a passion a deep passion for the sport, and she’s competed in most female-based disciplines over her lifetime.

“I did them all in high school,” she said of barrel racing, pole bending, breakaway roping and goat tying. “I really do like to breakaway rope. I don’t do very much of it anymore, but it’s right up there on the list.”

Her focus these days is in barrel racing, primarily because the financial opportunities in rodeo are greater in that event than in the roping. Of course, it helps to have a solid partner, and she does in Cuatro Snow, an 11-year-old bay/brown gelding she calls Cuatro.

“I got him when he was 5 years old,” Shy-Anne said. “He had been on the track a little but not in any races. He’d been worked out. I’ve done all the legwork myself; I started him completely. When I got him, he was track broke, but he was not the brokest thing. I spent a lot of time getting that done.

“I knew right away when I started him on the barrels that he had enough potential.”

She seasoned Cuatro, meaning exposing him to all the things that can happen in barrel racing and rodeo. From crowds to added noise to traveling, it’s all part of conditioning the animal to perform at its best. Now she will enter the circuit finals as the eighth-ranked cowgirl in the standings.

“I always knew he had the talent to do it, so I stuck with him,” she said. “The last three years has been fun.

“Going a little more is my goal for next year. The past two summers, I’ve gone to my circuit rodeos. Next year, I’d like to go a little bit more.”

Even though Ryan won’t be in the competition in Duncan, he will be around to lend a hand and plenty of support. The two have been together since the fall of 2005, just a few months prior to his most celebrated moment, and married in December 2010.

“I was there at his first NFR and his first gold buckle,” Shy-Anne said.

Ryan not only returns to the NFR this December, but he also has qualified for the Canadian Finals Rodeo, which will take place in November in Edmonton, Alberta. That means through the 2015 campaign, the couple spent more time apart than they had in years as she worked to make her way into the circuit finale.

“It’s hard, because you put your normal wife things, the normal activities, on hold a little bit,” she said. “I think we make it work because we have good communication, and we help each other even though we’re not right there together.”

The good news is they’ll be together in mid-October while competing close to home.

“It’s really neat being this close to home,” Shy-Anne said. “That’s another reason I wanted to pursue making the circuit finals the last couple of years. It’s a good place to have it. I know the Prairie Circuit has struggled to have a place to call it home. To me, that makes a difference when you’re trying to qualify for the circuit finals.

“You want to have a good rodeo and a good committee to work with.”

She may be a little biased, but that’s OK. Both Billy Bob and Sandy Bowden are instrumental in planning the annual championship in Duncan. But as a cowgirl that competes for a living, there’s much more that goes into her quest for rodeo titles.

“I rodeo because I love it,” she said. “I don’t think I ever could’ve been one who sat in a cubicle from 9 to 5. I have to have a challenge. I crave the work. It’s living on the edge, from one day to the next. That’s the way with rodeo and with training horses.”

It’s also the heart and soul of a champion.

postheadericon Rangers still finding success

ALVA, Okla. – Goals and aspirations are one thing; accomplishing them oftentimes is another.

For the Northwestern Oklahoma State University rodeo teams, reaching goals is all about the preparation involved. With just two events under their belts, the men’s and women’s squads are reaching for championships for the 2015-16 season.

Austin Graham

Austin Graham

“As a team, I think we have all the talent to win the region,” said Austin Graham, a bareback rider from Jay, Okla. “The way I look at it, it looks like we have the talent to compete for a national title.”

Each step taken by the Rangers is one more toward that ultimate prize. The first happens in the practice arena, where cowboys and cowgirls hone their skills and their mindsets in order to compete in the Central Plains Region, annually recognized as one of the top circuit’s in the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association.

From there, it’s competing well at each of the 10 rodeos, and the Rangers have done that so far. In fact, Graham won the bareback riding championship this past weekend in Woodward, Okla., finishing second in both rounds and winning the two-ride aggregate. He was joined in the winner’s circle by Jacob Edler, a steer wrestler from State Center, Iowa.

Jacob Edler

Jacob Edler

“We’ve talked about this, and it’s never happened, but we want to be the men’s and women’s team champions,” said Edler, who finished third in the first round, then won the championship round to claim the title in Woodward. “We’ve got the best athletes we’ve ever had. We’re going to try to win first all the way around.”

So far, it’s working quite well. Besides both Rangers teams being near the top of the standings, Graham, Edler and tie-down roper Bryson Seachrist of Apache, Okla., are atop the list in their events. In Woodward, Seachrist won the first round and placed in the short go-round to finish fourth overall.

“I’ve been rodeoing since high school, and the key to winning at rodeos is about 20 percent talent, and the other 80 percent is being mentally strong,” said Edler, noting that the teams gain a lot of understanding from coach Stockton Graves, a steer wrestler who has played on the biggest stages in the sport.

“I think Stockton does a great job of teaching mental toughness. We have a tournament-style match for every event we do. The kids that haven’t competed much or haven’t learned how to win learn how to do approach the mental aspect of competition. It teaches you how to win.”

In fact, that oftentimes is the driving force for cowboys and cowgirls in deciding on Northwestern to further their college education and rodeo training.

“Stockton has been to the NFR seven times,” Graham said. “He can teach you the things you need to do to go rodeo: Working on my attitude, staying positive, learning how to enter and learning how to win.”

Those lessons are paying off for the Rangers. While Edler won the steer wrestling title this past weekend, he was joined in the final round by four teammates: Layne Livermont, Ty Battie, Tyrell Cline and Maverick Harper. Battie finished sixth overall, while Cline (fourth) and Harper (third) placed even higher.

The women were paced by breakaway ropers Elli Price, who finished second in both the short round and the aggregate race, and Ashton Johnson, who finished third in both rounds and the average. Laremi Allred paved the way in goat-tying, winning the final round and finishing third overall. She was joined in the short round by Shayna Miller, who placed second in the first round, and Tearnee Nelson, who finished in a tie for third in the opening round.

“The first weekend, I won second, and the win in Woodward is helping in the points,” Edler said. “I’m able to take the lead in the standings for the year, but I know with these rodeos it’s dang sure a marathon and not a sprint.

“I’ve been awful fortunate to go to school at Northwestern. We have a great group of bulldoggers, and our coach, Stockton Graves, couldn’t be a better mentor or coach. He makes sure we’re staying sharp in the classroom and in the arena.”

postheadericon Lunak is Outa Sight in Hempstead

HEMPSTEAD, Texas – The last time Buck Lunak competed at the Waller County Fair and Rodeo, things didn’t go so well.

“I came here two years ago, and they threw me off,” said Lunak, a bareback rider from Cut Bank, Mont. “I’m glad to come back and do good. It means a lot. It’ll help me get my qualifications up for this year, so I’ll be able to go to some bigger winter rodeos and get my shot to end up in the top 15.”

WallerCountyLOGOHe posted an 84-point ride on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Outa Sight on Saturday night to win the title and $1,951. That should be the perfect kick-start to the new season, which began Oct. 1 in Hempstead.

He’ll have a solid calendar year to maintain his spot among the very best in order to qualify for 2016 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, the sport’s grand finale that features only the top 15 contestants from each regular season. It would be a first for the eight-year pro from the Blackfeet Nation.

“I went out a little bit last year, but I was hurt for about four years in a row,” he said. “I’m a Native American and a cowboy, and if I can make a living off a horse, then that’s the greatest thing in the world. I love bareback riding. It’s wild and control; it’s everything. If you can make a job out if, that’s what I want to do. I want to do this great.”

He was pretty great on the final night of the Waller County Fair and Rodeo, and so was his dance partner, Outa Sight, which has been selected to buck at the NFR four times.

“I know that everybody here wanted that horse, so I was pretty happy to have her by my name,” Lunak said. “I just knew it was supposed to be good to ride. She’s bred out big and has the looks you want, so I was pretty excited.

“That’s the type of horse you want to get on. She’s big and showy. She’s got the reputation, so all you’ve got to do is show up and do your job.”

It worked out just fine for Lunak.

Waller County Fair and Rodeo
Oct. 1-3
Hempstead, Texas
Bareback riding:
1. Buck Lunak, 84 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Outa Sight, $1,951; 2. Bill Tutor, 83.5, $1,496; 3. Winn Ratliff, 82.5, $1,105; 4. Jake Brown, 81, $716; 5. (tie) Matt Bright, Evan Jayne and Heath Ford, 80, $347 each; 8. Richmond Champion, 78, $195.

Steer wrestling: 1. Stan Branco, 4.1 seconds, $2,011; 2. Cody Doescher, 4.2, $1,748; 3. Ryan Bothum, 4.3, $1,486; 4. Logan Glendhill, 4.4, $1,224; 5. (tie) Josh Clark and Tyler Gibson, 4.5, $830 each; 7. Clayton Hass, 5.0, $437; 8. Wade Steffen, 5.1, $175.

Team roping: 1. Wes Kent/Scott Webster, 4.3 seconds, $3,204 each; 2. Rowdy Riekan/Justin Price, 4.5, $2,866; 3. Will Clark/Kolby Miller, 4.7, $2,529; 4. Shane Philipp/John Philipp, 4.8, $2,192; 5. Luke Brown/Martin Lucero, 4.9, $1,855; 6. Cord Crowell/Trey Carter III and Kelsey Parchman/Matt Kasner, 5.2, $1,349 each; 8. Tyler Wade/Kinney Harrell, 5.3, $843; 8. (tie) Tee Luttrell/Clay Sieber, Logan Olson/Jordan Olson and Jake Orman/James Arnold, 5.4, $225 each.

Saddle bronc riding: 1. (tie) Nick LaDuke, on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Ginger Snap, and Bradley Harter, on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Fiesta Savy, 79 points, $1,823 each; 3. Sam Spreadborough, 77, $1,170; 4. (tie) Justin Caylor, Jacobs Crawley and Sterling Crawley, 76, $528 each; 7. (tie) Isaac Diaz, Alex Wright and CoBurn Bradshaw, 73, $161 each.

Tie-down roping leaders: 1. Timber Moore, 8.0 seconds, $2,248; 2. Houston Hutto, 8.2, $1,955; 3. (tie) Dennis Luetge and Cimarron Boardman, 9.0, $1,515 each; 5. Robert Mathis, 9.2, $1,075; 6. Josh Eirikson, 9.7, $782; 7. (tie) Ace Slone, Bradley Bynum and Clint Singleton, 10.0, $228 each.

Barrel racing leaders: 1. Benette Little, 14.90 seconds, $2,666; 2. Jackie Jatzlau, 14.93, $2,266; 3. Mary Burger, 15.05, $1,866; 4. Andrea Cline, 15.09, $1,600; 5. Kelly Bruner, 15.12, $1,333; 6. Jaime Hinton, 15.14, $933; 7. Kelly Clifton, 15.21, $666; 8. Ahnna Peterson, 15.22, $533; 9. Martha Wright, 15.23, $467; 10. Raylene Cox, 15.31, $400; 11. Jenna Beaver, 15.33, $333; 12. Janet Staton, 15.35, $267.

Steer roping: First round: 1. (tie) Vin Fisher Jr., and Trey Sheets, 9.9 seconds, $897 each; 3. Scott Snedecor, 10.0, $643; 4. Ralph Williams, 10.6, $474; 5. Chet Herren, 11.0, $305; 6. Leo Campbell, 11.2, $169. Second round: 1. Lawson Plemons, 9.9 seconds, $981; 2. Tony Reina, 10.4, $812; 3. Guy Allen, 10.6, $643; 4. Corey Ross, 10.7, $474; 5. Coy Thompson, 11.3, $305; 6. J. Tom Fisher, 11.4, $169. Third round: 1. Roger Branch, 9.8 seconds, $981; 2. JB Whatley, 10.1, $812; 3. J. Tom Fisher, 10.2, $643; 4. Brian Garr, 10.4, $474; 5. C.A. Lauer, 10.6, $305; 6. Dan Fisher, 11.0, $169. Average: 1. Scott Snedecor, 33.8 seconds on three head, $1,472; 2. Trey Sheets, 35.2, $1,218; 3. Cody Lee, 36.4, $964; 4. Chet Herren, 38.2, $711; 5. John Bland, 39.0, $457; 6. Tony Reina, 39.1, $254.

Bull riding: 1. Jeffrey Joseph Ramagos, 85 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Red One, $2,200; 2. Tim Bingham, 83.5, $1,686; 3. Eli Vastbinder, 81, $1,246; 4. (tie) Troy Garcia, 79.5, $807; 5. (tie) Ardie Maier, Bayle Worden and Dustin Boquet, 79, $391 each; 8. (tie) Lucas Guilbeau and Reagan Avery, 71, $110 each.

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