Archive for February, 2016

postheadericon A hero went home

EDITOR’S NOTE: As I looked through social media, I came across a post that shared the photo of Josh Pearce of Guymon, Okla. I never met Josh, but I wrote about him – a little about his death, but much more about the short life he lived. Josh died Feb. 26, 2006, in Iraq, where he was fighting for our freedom. I wrote this story the next day for the Guymon Daily Herald. At the end, I will include the sentiments I had that day. In my career, I’ve written about triumphs and treasures, murders and losses. At the request of Josh Pearce’s family, I met with them a day after the loss of their loved one. It was one of the toughest stories I’ve ever told. God bless our heroes.

 

Joshua Pearce lived each day as if it were his last.

He smiled often, loved always and enjoyed all that he did. He was voted “Life of the Party” and “Best Looking” as a senior at Guymon High School in 2003. His gregarious nature was contagious, family members said Monday.

“He made everyone feel like you were his best friend,” said his mother, Becky Hilliard.

Josh Pearce was a soldier and proud to serve his country. He died Sunday doing so, killed as his vehicle ran over an explosive device in Iraq. He was 21.

“He just always wanted to be a soldier,” Becky Hilliard said, noting that he joined the U.S. Army after graduating high school.

Ted Harbin TwisTed Rodeo

Ted Harbin
TwisTed Rodeo

Pearce had been in Iraq for six months. His brother, Jeremy Pearce, has been serving in Iraq, too. Josh was a vehicle commander and forward observer, and Jeremy is a sergeant in a tank unit. They return to U.S. soil this week.

“My oldest son is bringing him home,” Becky Hilliard said.

A single yellow ribbon is wrapped around a single tree in front of the Hilliard’s Guymon home. Inside, friends frequently visit, offering comfort and condolences to the family as it mourns.

A son’s words

Joshua Pearce wrote often to his family. His mother says she talked with him every day, whether by e-mail or instant messaging or by phone.

In a letter he wrote for the public on Sept. 11, 2005, Pearce said, “I do not want to die, but if that’s what I was put on this earth to do, then everyone should know that I went for a cause that in my heart was worth dying for.”

It helps, some, to know Josh died doing what he loved, that he was proud of his service, that he loved his country.

But when young men die, it’s never easy.

“This is what he wanted to do,” Becky Hilliard said. “He wouldn’t want us to be here crying.”
But tears are there, and they will continue to be there. No matter how noble the cause, no matter how much pride there is, losing a loved one brings out several emotions. That’s what it was like at the Hilliard home Monday.

“He told me he was doing this so his nephews didn’t have to do it,” said his sister, Heidi Barncastle. “He was the kind of person who would do anything for anyone and everyone.”

Young Josh

Despite the tears, smiles emerge easily for Joshua Pearce’s family. The remembrances serve as a coping method, but more, they serve as reminder of how he lived each day.

“He always kept us laughing,” Barncastle said.

Stories of kitchen dishes buried in the backyard because they were too dirty to clean to Josh’s painting the water tower to his lighting things on fire exorcised the tears and provided hearty laughter. He and a group of male friends even performed as the Spice Girls in a contest once.

Rick Hilliard, Pearce’s step-father, said there never was a “step” relationship – “He’s our dad in our eyes,” Barncastle said of Rick. Rick and Josh shared a close bond.

“He was my little turd,” Rick said, smiling through his grief. “We had our clashes, but we hugged and loved …”

His words trailed off, but the sentiment was there.

“Rick was Josh’s favorite person in the world,” Becky Hilliard said, “and he had no problem telling people that.”

A son comes home

Services are yet to be scheduled for Joshua Pearce, born Nov. 23, 1984. Both Josh and Jeremy requested that if they were to die in action that they receive a hero’s burial at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C.

“You never saw Josh frown,” Becky Hilliard said. “In every letter, he wrote that he’s still smiling. That’s just who he was.

“He was the most amazing, genuine and gentle person.”

The family will have a large memorial service at the First Baptist Church in Guymon, though details have yet to be ironed out.

The surreal nature of Josh’s death is still new to the family. Time will heal, they know, but the pain is strong.

“It’s just not reality, I guess,” Barncastle said. “I keep thinking I’m going to wake up and it’ll all be a dream.

“My brothers have always been invincible to me.”

Rick Hilliard plans to do everything in his power to keep this from happening to the family’s oldest son, Jeremy.

“I don’t know how we’re going to do it,” Rick Hilliard said, “but we need him here. This is just too much.”

The Hilliards have four other children: Jeremy Pearce, Brandon Widows, Heidi Barncastle and Shanese Hilliard. Their family will come together to mourn, to love, to remember.

“I never let him say ‘goodbye’ on the computer,” Becky Hilliard said. “He could say, ‘See you later,’ or something like that, but never goodbye.”

Goodbye is inevitable, but a solder is coming home.

I know I’m supposed to be unemotional, but I just couldn’t help it this time. As I saw the emotion in their eyes as we talked about Josh today, tears kept appearing in my eyes. Not very professional, I know, but I can’t deny my human feelings. I came home and kissed the love of my life, who had me lean on her for just a few minutes. I went back to work, attended a meeting and began writing at 2:30 this afternoon. I struggled at first, but by 3, I had an idea. I ran with it and completed the story in 45 minutes.

I cried all the way through it.

postheadericon An Oklahoma original

CINCH TIMED EVENT CHAMPIONSHIP HAS BEEN PART OF STATE’S LANDSCAPE FOR 31 YEARS

GUTHRIE, Okla. – The CINCH Timed Event Championship is a staple in Oklahoma, as much as anything along the red-dirt landscape.

Dubbed the “Ironman of ProRodeo,” the event has crowned some of the greatest champions in rodeo history over its 31-year history, men like reigning titlist Trevor Brazile and hall-of-famers like Paul Tierney, Jimmie Cooper and Leo Camarillo. There has never been a champion from Oklahoma win this prestigious event.

Clay Smith

Clay Smith

Four men making up one-fifth of the field hope to change that during the 2016 CINCH TEC, which features five challenging go-rounds from Friday, March 4-Sunday, March 6, at the Lazy E Arena. The overall winner will earn the $100,000 first-place prize.

“It would be great to be the first Okie to win that,” said Clay Smith of Broken Bow, Okla., the 2014 reserve champion. “Whoever wins that is a pretty good cowboy, and that’s what this whole sport is all about. It’s not only about being good with a rope but also being able to ride your horse and make 25 runs over three days.

“It takes good horsemanship and a lot of grit. I’ve had a lot of fun there, and I would love to win that deal.”

Smith will be joined in the exclusive field of 20 competitors by three other Oklahomans: Cody Doescher of Oklahoma City, Trell Etbauer of Goodwell and Brodie Poppino of Big Cabin. They’ll test their skills against the greatest all-around timed-event talent in the game, including seven-time champ Brazile, three-time winner Daniel Green, two-time titlist Kyle Lockett and two other champions, Josh Peek and Paul David Tierney.

Trell Etbauer

Trell Etbauer

They will compete in all five rodeo timed events: heading, heeling, tie-down roping, steer wrestling and steer roping. There will be two rounds each on Friday and Saturday, beginning at noon and 7:30 p.m. each day, and the final round will begin at 1 p.m. Sunday.

“They only invite 20 guys, so to get the invitation is pretty special,” Etbauer said. “There’s not another event like it. It’s a cowboy event. Not everybody can go out there and do every timed event, so it’s just a battle to see who is the better hand.”

Over the history of the game, nobody has been recognized as “the better hand” more than Brazile. In addition to his seven CTEC titles, he is a 23-time ProRodeo world champion and only one of two men to have earned qualifications to the National Finals in all four roping disciplines – Brazile owns world titles in steer roping (6), tie-down roping (3) and heading (1). He also knows how to handle the challenges that come up over the course of the “Ironman of ProRodeo.”

Brodie Poppino

Brodie Poppino

“It brings out the guys’ strengths and weaknesses and shows their mental toughness more than anything, even on top of their physical toughness,” said Poppino, a second-generation cowboy who will compete in the CTEC for the first time in his career. “It’s called the ‘Ironman’ for a reason; it’s a big-time challenge, and that’s what I like about it.

“Everybody has their strong points, and everybody has their weak points. It’s about overcoming their weak points, and that’s why it gives anybody a chance to win it.”

Doescher returns for the third straight year, and he has experienced every aspect of the game in his two previous campaigns. He understands what a grueling test the Timed Event is for all 20 combatants.

“It’s such a cowboy competition and not just a rodeo,” he said. “Guys get out of their comfort zone and have to do things they don’t do every day. It brings out the weaknesses everybody has and the mind games, and you have to overcome it in one event. That’s what makes it such a great event.”

Cody Doescher

Cody Doescher

Of the four Oklahomans in the field, Etbauer and Smith are the longest tenured; both men were rookies in the 2013 CTEC, and both have earned nice paychecks over their three previous outings. In 2014, Smith came within a whisker of claiming the championship, finishing second to Paul David Tierney that March. He hopes to parlay a terrific start to his 2016 ProRodeo season into another shot at the coveted CTEC gold buckle.

“To win that deal, your horsepower has got to be good, and you’ve got to have good help,” said Smith, who will lean on his brother, Jake, as his partner in the team roping disciplines and his hazer in steer wrestling. “I really love being in the Timed Event, but if something happened and I couldn’t enter, I’d still love to go watch it.

“You get to see guys who do other professional events and see them out of their element. You see people who do something they’re not used to doing, and then you get to see how they react to it. It’s really amazing to watch.”

postheadericon Stars to shine at Bay City rodeo

BAY CITY, Texas – The stars come out brightly at the Matagorda County Fair and Rodeo.

The annual event – set for 7 p.m. Thursday, March 3-Saturday, March 5, at the Matagorda County Fairgrounds – will be a combination of rising stars and established veterans all competing top dollar and a big championship in this south Texas community.

A big reason why is because of Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo, which produces the annual event.

BayCity-logo“With Pete Carr, we know we’ve got some of the best stock coming in to our rodeo,” said Daniel Tucker, chairman of the fair’s rodeo committee. “We’ve got a great representation from the NFR cowboys, and a lot of the stock that is at our rodeo has been to the NFR. I’m sure the top stock is a very big reason why we get some of the best cowboys to our rodeo.”

The Carr firm is the largest stock contracting company in ProRodeo and has been nominated for Stock Contractor of the Year for each of the past three years. No other stock contractor in the PRCA has had more animals at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in that same time frame.

Each year, those animals are a drawing card for the biggest names in the game. Last year’s field included numerous world champions and even more NFR qualifiers. Only the top cowboys and cowgirls in the game each year advance to ProRodeo’s grand finale.

“We get a good crowd at our rodeo, and they know they’ll get a top-rate show,” Tucker said.

That show is a reflection of the hard work of the local rodeo committee that works on behalf of the fair and rodeo. For Tucker and his crew of volunteers, the goal is to entertain a crowd of thousands each of the three performances.

“We also have slack night on Wednesday night, and people can come in and watch that with just a gate admission to the fair,” Tucker said. “We have specific tickets to the rodeo performances (Thursday-Saturday), but you get into the fair with a rodeo ticket.”

In addition, there are several unique events that add a local flavor to the ProRodeo, including mutton busting, a calf scramble, junior steer saddling and wild cow saddling.

“Those events are a hit with our local crowd, and they’re always a big deal for us,” he said.

The local rodeo is a powerful mixture of world-class competition and family-friendly entertainment, and organizers lean on the Pete Carr crew to handle the top-flight production that helps blend it all together.

“I think they bring a real class act,” Tucker said of the Carr team. “They are very professional, extremely friendly and nice to work with. They go out of their way to put on a good performance and a great show. Pete wants to make sure everything works and is successful. It sure makes it a lot easier on me as the rodeo chairman.

“I can’t say enough about the crew. We get a lot of people from outside of the county that come to our rodeo, and they really like it. There’s not a bad seat in the house.”

That makes it the perfect venue for an amazing rodeo.

postheadericon Cooper carrying on family tradition

GUTHRIE, Okla. – Jimmie Cooper is one of the greatest cowboys in ProRodeo history.

From Monument, N.M., Cooper was the 1980 overall, steer wrestling and tie-down roping Rookie of the Year in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. A year later, he was crowned the all-around world champion. He qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in team roping, tie-down roping and steer wrestling. For that, he has been inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame.

Though he scaled back his rodeo schedule in 1985 to focus on his family, Jimmie Cooper remained active enough to continue to win. In fact, he was a three-time titlist at the Timed Event Championship, a once-a-year unique event that features just 20 cowboys competing in all five timed-event disciplines: heading, heeling, tie-down roping, steer wrestling and steer roping.

He won the coveted title at the “Ironman of ProRodeo” in 1988, ’92 and ’94 and is one of just 12 men to have earned the event’s gold buckle. He last competed in the Timed Event in 2012, when he was 55 years old. Last March, he was awarded the Clem McSpadden Pioneer Award.

Jim Ross Cooper

Jim Ross Cooper

This year, he will be remembered again, this time while watching son, Jim Ross Cooper. Jim Ross, a five-time NFR qualifier in heeling, returns to the Lazy E Arena, a place where he grew up watching his father compete with the greatest in the game. This will be the third time the younger Cooper has competed in the event – he also was one of the featured players in 2011-12.

This year’s Timed Event takes place Friday, March 4-Sunday, March 5, at the arena northeast of Oklahoma City. Jim Ross Cooper would love nothing better than to show the rodeo world why he owns the genetics of a true legend.

“My bulldogging performance in the past has embarrassed me there,” said Jim Ross, a key member of the Tate Branch Auto Group “Riding for the Brand” team of ProRodeo cowboys. “It’s a mountain I have to climb, because I don’t like the feeling of something getting the better of me, so I’m going to have another go at it.”

That redemption is always on the back of his mind, but he also loves the format. It’s a true test of a cowboy’s skills, and the five-round championship spread out over just three days not only tests each man’s endurance but also his mental focus.

“It’s one of the coolest events of the year for rodeo,” Jim Ross said. “There’s a lot more technical difficulty to it and a lot of cowboy to it. As much as it brings out the best all-around cowboy in rodeo – which is why Trevor Brazile has won it so many times (7) – it shows who has the ability to adjust to the challenges, be mentally tough and figure it out.”

That’s where the family’s legendary talent will truly shine.

postheadericon Reigning champs eager to repeat

GUYMON, Okla. – There are certain events in ProRodeo that contestants love to win.

The Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo is one of them.

That’s one of the reasons it was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame last summer, and it’s why nearly 1,000 competitors will make their way to the Oklahoma Panhandle for this year’s event, set for 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 6; 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 7; and 2 p.m. Sunday, May 8, at Henry C. Hitch Pioneer Arena.

Jake Long

Jake Long

“It’s a great rodeo to win,” said heeler Jake Long, who won the title last year with then-partner Coleman Proctor. “It works as a double dip for us, because the Prairie Circuit is our home circuit. Any time we can get some money together to get to our circuit finals, it’s a good thing.”

It marked the first Pioneer Days victory for Long and Proctor, and they plan to return this spring to defend their titles, albeit with different partners. Long is roping with header Luke Brown, while Proctor is competing with heeler Buddy Hawkins. Still, Long and Proctor have a lot of great memories together, and the Guymon title is one of them.

Coleman Proctor

Coleman Proctor

“I know Jake was hungry for this one,” Proctor said. “The first time I headed was in college for Jake, and we won the college rodeo here. We’ve wanted to win the ProRodeo here, so I just wanted to get him turned and give Jake a chance.”

Pioneer Days is Oklahoma’s richest rodeo and the only Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association sanctioned event in the Sooner State to have been inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame. It holds a long history and has featured the very best cowboys and cowgirls.

It’s especially prestigious to those who have ties to the area once known as No Man’s Land. Take Taos Muncy, an alumnus of the Oklahoma Panhandle State University rodeo team, and Shali Lord, who was born in Guymon and spent a good portion of her childhood in Texas County, Okla. Both earned their second Pioneer Days titles last May.

Shali Lord

Shali Lord

“It’s always fun going to Guymon because of friends and family,” said Lord, who last earned the Guymon trophy belt a decade before. “I think the ground has been the best it’s been in years. They had some moisture on it, and they try to keep it good and consistent.

“It was really good and really even throughout slack. My horse really liked it. It was hot on Sunday (the final day), but it was good underneath.”

Muncy has been back to the Oklahoma Panhandle often since hitting it big in 2007. That year, he parlayed the momentum of his first Pioneer Days title into the college championship, then clinched his first world title that December by having a fantastic run at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

Taos Muncy

Taos Muncy

Last May, he rode Powder River Rodeo’s Miss Chestnut for 88 points to pull off the victory, outlasting a field of ProRodeo’s elite talent.

“This is where it all started for me,” said Muncy, who also won the world title in 2011. “As soon as I came here for the bronc school my freshman year of high school, I knew where I wanted to go to college and where I wanted to hang out.”

It’s worked out quite well for the New Mexico cowboy. He has qualified for the NFR eight times in nine years – the only year he missed was in 2008 when he was sidelined for much of the season with an injury.

“It’s a big rodeo for us, and that’s a good time of year for us to all get there,” Muncy said. “Guymon is really special to me. I went to school there, and I have a lot of great friends there.

“It’s my secondary home.”

postheadericon Rogers out for Timed Event, replaced by Myers

Erich Rogers

Erich Rogers

Erich Rogers suffered a serious thumb injury over the last few days and will miss the CINCH Timed Event Championship.

Cash Myers

Cash Myers

He will be replaced by Cash Myers, a CTEC veteran who hasn’t been part of the prestigious field for several years. Myers has finished among the best in the business in the all-around, steer wrestling, tie-down roping and steer roping. He is a seven-time qualifier to the National Finals Rodeo and a six-time finalist at the Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping.

Rogers, who suffered the injury while competing in Tucson, Ariz., had surgery Monday. He should return to action, but it won’t be before the CTEC, which takes place Friday, March 4-Sunday, March 6, at the Lazy E Arena.

postheadericon White propels Rangers to KSU title

ALVA, Okla. – It’s been a long time coming for steer wrestler Brock White.

The Northwestern Oklahoma State University senior earned his first college championship this past weekend at the Kansas State University rodeo and helped propel the Rangers men to the team title in Manhattan, Kan.

“I really wasn’t expecting much out of it, because I’ve been kind of lacking on practice to start this year,” said White of Earlville, Iowa. “I wasn’t even in the standings, so I wasn’t sure what to expect. I decided to look at it like I do ProRodeo: Take a straight look on things and just make your run.”

Brock White

Brock White

That’s one of the many things he learned from Northwestern rodeo coach Stockton Graves, but it came in handy in Manhattan. As one of the first bulldoggers to compete last Friday, White set the pace early; his 4.5-second run held up to win the first round. He then followed that with a 5.0-second run in the championship round Sunday afternoon to clinch the title.

“I knew I had a pretty decent steer on my first one, then I just hung out the rest of the weekend,” White said. “I never really got nervous. When we got to the short round, I just sat in the back and let everybody make their runs. I didn’t panic and didn’t pressure myself. I knew I had a really good steer, and I just needed to score sharp and make a good run. I knew I had to be 5.5 to win it.”

He did better than that, and so did the rest of the Northwestern men. While White won the bulldogging title, teammate Chase Lako of Hunter, N.D., finished second. Another Ranger, Jacob Edler of State Center, Iowa, finished sixth.

Lako also placed sixth in tie-down roping and won the all-around title at K-State. Three other Northwestern tie-down ropers also had great success in Kansas, including event titlist Bryson Sechrist of Apache, Okla., who roped and tied two calves in 22.6 seconds to win. Mason Bowen of Bullard, Texas, finished second, and Wade Perry finished third. Bareback rider Austin Graham of Jay, Okla., placed third, while heeler Sawyer Barham of Barnsdall, Okla., placed fourth, and the team roping tandem of Taylor Munsell of Arnett, Okla., and Bubba Allred of Kanarraville, Utah, finished fifth.

The men scored 488.3 points, distancing themselves by more than 100 points over the No. 2 team, Oklahoma Panhandle State University. The women finished third. Munsell won the women’s all-around title, also earning a spot in the short round in breakaway roping – she was 2.5 seconds to finish in a four-way tie for second.

Other women in the short round were barrel racer Sara Bynum of Beggs, Okla., and three tie-down ropers: Tearnee Nelson, Shayna Miller and Katy Miller, all of Faith, S.D. Shayna Miller finished second with a two-run cumulative time of 13.2 seconds, while Katy Miller finished in a tie for fifth.

In all, it was a solid performance by all the Northwestern athletes, but none had a bigger weekend than White. Not only did he earn his first college rodeo title, he earned it with a bit of a handicap.

White is blind in his left eye, the result of a mishap that happened a little more than two years ago in Alva. He and a group of other Northwestern students were chute-dogging steers. During his turn, the steer popped his head up and caught White directly in the eye. The result was a torn optic nerve and a detached retina.

“I was down for about a month,” he said. “When the doctor released me, I contacted Perry Dietz, who had a couple rope horses here in town. I jumped on that horse and roped three in a row like it was nothing. That made me want to do it more.”

Roping is one thing, but it is still a difficult task for someone who has vision in just one eye. It was even tougher when White decided to return to wrestling steers.

“That depth perception is crazy,” White said. “I had Stockton hazing for me. I looked down, and he looked like he was a long ways away. It took Stockton being on the other side and telling me that I was OK. Now I have the muscle memory, but it took a bit to get comfortable with it.”

Those are the realities the young cowboy faces every day. He realized that his vision might limit his working opportunities once he graduates from Northwestern, but he has a great way to look at things. Instead of dwelling on his situation, White pushes forward. He has invested in rental property and still plans to pursue his rodeo dreams.

“I never want people to feel sorry for me,” he said. “I just want to show them that it doesn’t matter what happens in your life, anything is possible. It’s more than trying to make people happy. It’s trying to find something to leave behind. If you have the right people backing you, anything’s possible.

“I’ve had the support of Stockton and my parents saying I could do it. That’s helped me mature and understand the side of winning.”

Figuring out the best way to compete is just part of the battle. Finding the way to win is just as important in competition. That’s something the Rangers do every day in practice.

“We definitely dominated the weekend,” White said, noting that both the men’s and women’s teams sit second in the Central Plains Region standings. “We came away with a strong advantage. Stockton always pushes us to go out and win. He’s been there and done that, and he’s taught us how to win.”

It’s working.

postheadericon Casper to ride for $1 million

CLARENDON COLLEGE SOPHOMORE WILL COMPETE SUNDAY AT THE AMERICAN

CLARENDON, Texas – Many would love the opportunity to win $1 million.

Wyatt Casper has that opportunity.

The Clarendon College sophomore will ride at The AMERICAN, a one-day rodeo that will take place Sunday at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. The event offers a purse of more than $2 million, with $1 million being paid to the winner or winners who earned their way via a series of qualifiers. That’s where Casper’s opportunity lies.

“I don’t know if it’s set in on how big of a deal it is,” said Casper, a member of the Clarendon College rodeo team from Balko, Okla. “I’m confident in my bronc riding, and I think I can compete with all the best guys there. I’m sure that riding in front of that big of a crowd it will be real nerve-racking.”

Wyatt Casper

Wyatt Casper

It’s all a bit of a whirlwind for the young cowboy, who grew up roping at his Oklahoma Panhandle home. He has competed in team roping and tie-down roping all his life and actually just started riding bucking horses three years ago as a way to increase his opportunities for all-around championships.

“It was a pretty goofy deal,” he said. “They had two bronc riders (in his high school rodeo region) in the first semester, and the pot filled up to about $700. That’s what motivated me to start riding. I’ve roped my whole life, ever since I could walk.

“Rodeo is all I wanted to do when I was little bitty. My parents didn’t start roping until they met each other, and my dad and grandpa picked it up as a hobby. I’m almost a first-generation rodeo cowboy.”

He’s taken to it well. For the Clarendon College rodeo team, he sits third in the Southwest Region saddle bronc riding standings and is eighth in heading. His primary focus before advancing to The AMERICAN was to qualify for the College National Finals Rodeo. Now his eyes are set firmly on the top prize available.

“It’s a chance at a million dollars,” Casper said. “It’s what everybody hopes to do, and it could really set you up for the rest of your life.”

In The AMERICAN’s inaugural run in 2014, bareback rider Richmond Champion became the first cowboy to win the $1 million prize. Most of the field is made up of invited contestants, and none of the seeded cowboys and cowgirls is eligible for the $1 million. Champion was the only non-seeded winner in 2014.

A year ago, there were two, bareback rider Taylor Price and tie-down roper Reese Reimer. They split the top prize. They, along with the other event winners, also won $100,000. That kind of money great incentive for any rodeo competitor.

While the saddle bronc riding field at The AMERICAN will feature many of the top cowboys in the game, Casper has had some tremendous lessons, especially from Clarendon rodeo coach Bret Franks, a three-time qualifier in saddle bronc riding to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

“He’s been a great role model to me and taught me everything I know about bronc riding,” Casper said of his coach.

For his part, the longtime cowboy-turned-coach realizes there’s something special in Casper, who is a big part of the school’s rodeo team.

“He’s got a natural talent, and he approaches things very mental,” Franks said. “He was a high school quarterback, so he’s always been a leader. He’s definitely our leader.”

That mentality can go a long ways in rodeo. Not only does it take tremendous athleticism to compete in the sport, it takes a strong mind and a willingness to overcome any challenge that comes a cowboy’s way.

“There’s nothing better than getting tapped off on a bronc,” Casper said of matching the rhythm of the horse’s bucking action with a strong spur stroke. “Everybody else tries to stay away from bucking horses, and I try to ride them.”

In just a few days, he will try to ride a couple for his chance at a million dollars.

postheadericon Mitchell, Davis win coveted San Angelo title

Justin Davis, left, and Spencer Mitchell put their wraps on the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo team roping title. The two Californians have roped together on and off all their lives, and they are excited to pick up this win together. (PHOTO BY TODD BREWER)

Justin Davis, left, and Spencer Mitchell put their wraps on the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo team roping title. The two Californians have roped together on and off all their lives, and they are excited to pick up this win together. (PHOTO BY TODD BREWER)

SAN ANGELO, Texas – The moment was almost surreal for Justin Davis of Cottonwood, Calif.

He was backed into the heeler box inside the San Angelo Coliseum for the championship round of the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo on Friday night. To his left was his best friend, header Spencer Mitchell of Colusa, Calif. In front of them was a steer they knew they could win on.

Justin Davis

Justin Davis

“It’s as good as it gets,” said Davis, who finished off the tandem’s 4.0-second run to win the short round and clinch the San Angelo team roping title. “We’ve roped together our whole lives. We’ve been best friends our whole lives. I was just comfortable roping with him. We’re always on the same game plan.”

Mitchell and Davis grew up in the same part of northern California. Over the past few weeks, they made a serious run this West Texas community, placing in all three go-rounds and pocketing $9,490.

“We knew we had a good steer, and we just wanted to try not to back down at all and get out of our game plan,” said Mitchell, a two-time Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifier who earned the trip to Las Vegas in 2011-12. “We’d roped aggressive all week before, so we stuck to that.”

Mitchell is known for being aggressive, and that works just fine for Davis. It definitely worked in their favor Friday night and turned into the perfect way to close out a solid performance in San Angelo.

“Spencer got an unbelievable start,” said Davis, who qualified for the NFR in 2009. “He wants to be on the barrier every time and stay aggressive. He (roped the steer) really fast. As soon as he roped him, the steer checked up like he was going to stop. When Spencer turned him, the steer jumped away. I was just in the right place at the right time.

Spencer Mitchell

Spencer Mitchell

“We knew we had to be 4.6 to win the average, and I knew when Spencer got a rope on him that we were going to be fast.”

The solid finish will move both cowboys into the top 10 in their respective standings. It’s quite a bit different than last year, when Mitchell’s horse troubles caused the tandem to finish outside the top 40 in the final 2015 standings.

“We had roped together for a little while last summer, but I didn’t have the horses I felt confident in,” Mitchell said. “I just decided to go home until I got those horses.

“A friend of mine in Oregon told me at the end of the year that he had a couple of horses I needed to try. I’ve actually worked out pretty well on one of them. I’ve run four steers on her and placed on all four runs.”

That 12-year-old bay mare was a key factor in the tandem’s victory in San Angelo.

“She’s a little horse, but she has enough attitude and heart that she can make it,” he said. “She fits my style, and she has a lot of try to her. That’s what I like the most about her.”

Davis agrees, and he knows horsepower might be what gets the pair a return qualification to the NFR.

“That’s our ultimate goal,” Davis said. “I’ve had a fire lit in my ever since this year started. The mare he’s riding is unbelievable, and I’ve got two great heal horses.”

The combination allows the bragging rights to being the 2016 San Angelo champions.

“This is a huge win for us,” he said. “It’s one of the biggest rodeos of the year, and this is the biggest regular-season win of my life. This is one of the rodeos that was on my bucket list.

“There was a lot of energy in that building tonight. The events leading up to ours was good. Bareback riding was outstanding, and then my buddy, K.C. Jones, won the bulldogging. When he won it, I really wanted to win it, so that got me going even more.”

There’s no reason for Mitchell and Davis to stop now.

San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo
Feb. 5-7, Feb. 12-14, Feb. 17-19
Bareback riding: Round 1:
1. Tanner Aus, 90 points on J Bar J Rodeo’s Pass The Hat, $4,256; 2. Jake Vold and R.C. Landingham, 88, $2,837 each; 4. Caleb Bennett, 86.5, $1,560; 5. (tie) Mason Clements, Jamie Howlett and Tim O’Connell, 84.5, $757 each; 8. (tie) Luke Creasy and Jake Brown, 84, $213 each. Final round: 1. Caleb Bennett, 90.5 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Dirty Jacket, $1,650; 2. Jake Vold, 89.5, $1,250; 3. Tim O’Connell, 89, $900; 4. Mason Clements, 88, $600; 5. Teddy Athan, 82.5, $350; R.C. Landingham, 81, $250. Average: 1. Jake Vold, 177.5 points on two rides, $4,256; 2. Caleb Bennett, 177, $3,263; 3. Tim O’Connell, 173.5, $2,411; 4. Mason Clements, 172.5, $1,560; 5. R.C. Landingham. 169, $992; 6. Teddy Athan, 165.5, $709; 7. Luke Creasy, 161, $567; 8. Jamie Howlett, 84.5 points on one ride, $426.

Steer wrestling: First round: 1. (tie) Josh Clark and Riley Duvall, 3.6 seconds, $3,321 each; 3. (tie) K.C. Jones, T.J. Hall, Dakota Eldridge and Heath Thomas, 3.9, $1,931 each; 7. (tie) Stan Branco and Orrin Fontenot, 4.0, $541 each. Second round: 1. Jacob Talley, 3.5 seconds, $3552; 2. (tie) Blake Knowles and Kody Woodward, 3.8, $2,857 each; 4. (tie) Clayton Tuchscherer and Mike McGinn, 3.9, $1,931 each; 6. Justin Morehouse, 4.0, $1,236; 7. (tie) Rowdy Parrott and Clint Shofner, 4.1, $541 each. Final round: 1. Matt Reeves, 3.9 seconds, $2,001; 2. K.C. Jones, 4.1, $1,656; 3. Jace Melvin, 4.2, $1,311; 4. (tie) Riley Duvall and Dakota Eldridge, 4.5, $794 each; 6. Scott Guenthner, 5.2, $345; Average: 1. K.C. Jones, 12.3 seconds on three runs, $5,328; 2. Dakota Eldridge, 12.8, $4,634; 3. Riley Duvall, 12.9, $3,939; 4. Matt Reeves, 13.9, $3,244; 5. Jace Melvin, 14.2, $2,548; 6. Scott Guenthner, 14.9, $1,853; 7. Nick Guy, 15.1, $1,158; 8. Timmy Sparing, 16.0, $463.

Team roping: First round: 1. Adam Rose/Walt Woodard, 4.0 seconds, $3,506; 2. Colby Lovell/Will Wodfin, 4.1, $3,049; 3. Cody Snow/Dugan Kelly, 4.2, $2.592; 4. (tie) Billy Bob Brown/Garrett Jess and Bart Brunson/Zack Mabry, 4.5, $1,906 each; 6. (tie) Nathan McWhorter/Dustin Davis and Justin Davis/Zane Bruce, 4.6, $991 each; 8. (tie) Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger, Tyler Wade/Kinney Harrell and Spencer Mitchell/Justin Davis, 4.7, $102 each. Second round: 1. Kolton Schmidt/Shay Carroll, 3.6 seconds, $3,506; 2. (tie) Spencer Mitchell/Justin Davis, Brady Tryan/Tommy Zuniga and Tate Kirchenschlager/Trevor Kirchenschlager, 3.9, $2,592 each; 5. (tie) Levi Simpson/Jeremy Buhler, Lane Ivy/Allen Bach, Casey Tew/John Robertson and Drew Horner/Trey Johnson, 4.0, $991 each. Final round: 1. Spencer Mitchell/Justin Davis, 4.0 seconds, $1,537; 2. Kelsey Parchman/Matt Kasner, 4.1, $1,272; 3. Billy Bob Brown/Garrett Jess, 4.4, $1,007; 4. Colby Lovell/Will Woodfin, 4.6, $742; 5. Brandon Webb/Mickey Gomez, 4.7, $447; 6. (tie) Cody Snow/Dugan Kelly and Justin Davis/Zane Bruce, 4.8, $133 each. Average: 1. Spencer Mitchell/Justin Davis, 12.6 seconds on three runs, $5,259; 2. Colby Lovell/Will Woodfin, 13.3, $4,573; 3. Billy Bob Brown/Garrett Jess, 13.7, $3,887; 4. Kelsey Parchman/Matt Kasner, 14.1, $3,201; 5. Brandon Webb/Mickey Gomez, 14.5, $2,525; 6. Justin Davis/Zane Bruce, 14.6, $1,829; 7. Cody Snow/Dugan Kelly, 15.4, $1,143; 8. Adam Rose/Walt Woodard, 17.1, $457.

Saddle bronc riding: First round: 1. Jacobs Crawley, 88 points on Powder River Rodeo’s Rich n Fancy, $3,353; 2. Allen Boore, 85.5, $2,571; 3. Rusty Wright, 85, $1,900; 4. Curtis Garton, 83, $1,229; 5. (tie) Jesse Bail and Doug Aldridge, 82.5, $671 each; 7. Joey Sonnier III, 82, $447; 8. Tyrell Smith, 81.5, $335. Final round: 1. Rusty Wright, 86 points on J Bar J Rodeo’s Night Line II, $1,650; 2. Allen Boore, 85.5, $1,250; 3. Curtis Garton, 84.5, $900; 4. Ryan Mackenzie, 83, $600; 5. Jacobs Crawley, 82, $350; 6. Joey Sonnier, 80.5, $250. Average: 1. (tie) Rusty Wright and Allen Bore, 171 points on two rides, $2,962 each; 3. Jacobs Crawley, 170, $1,900; 4. Curtis Garton, 167.5, $1,229; 5. Ryan Mackenzie, 164, $782; 6. Joey Sonnier III, 162.5, $559; 7. (tie) Doug Aldridge and Jesse Bail, 162, $391 each.

Tie-down roping: First round: 1. Jake Pratt, 7.9 seconds, $4,106; 2. (tie) Michael Otero, Caleb Smidt and Neil Dove, 8.0, $3,035 each; 5. (tie) Garrett Hale and E.J. Roberts, 8.1, $1,696 each; 7. (tie) Chant DeForest and Ike Fontenot, 8.2, $625 each. Second round: 1. Marcos Costa, 7.4 seconds, $4,106; 2. Riley Pruitt, 7.7, $3,571; 3. (tie) Timber Moore and J.D. Kibbe, 7.8, $2,767 each; 5. (tie) Hunter Herrin and Justin Macha, 7.9, $1,696 each; 7. Sterling Smith, 8.1, $893; 8. (tie) Tyler Prcin, Quay Howard and Jerrad Hofstetter, 8.2, $119 each. Final round: 1. Caleb Smidt, 8.3 seconds, $1,943; 2. (tie) Jayce Johnson and Timber Moore, 9.7, $1,441; 4. Chand DeForest, 10.9, $938; 5. Tyler Prcin, 13.0, $603; 6. (tie) Zeb Chapman and E.J. Roberts, 13.1, $168 each.  Average: 1. Caleb Smidt, 35.0 seconds on three runs, $6,159; 2. Timber Moore, 27.1, $5,356; 3. Jayce Johnson, 27.9, $4,552; 4. Chant DeForest, 28.7, $3,749; 5. Tyler Prcin, 30.4, $2,946; 6. E.J. Roberts, 30.7, $2,142; 7. Zeb Chapman, 31.5, $1,339; 8. Marcos Costa, 37.1, $536.

Barrel racing: First round: 1. Mary Walker, 15.59 seconds, $4,624; 2. (tie) Jana Bean and Megan Lewis, 15.64, $3,633; 4. (tie) Pamela Capper and Tiany Schuster, 15.67, $2,532; 6. Sherry Cervi, 15.68, $1,762; 7. Kelley Schnaufer, 15.69, $1,321; 8. Stevi Hillman, 15.72, $881; 9. Kaley Bass, 15.76, $661; 10. Sarah Rose McDonald, 15.77, $440. Second round: 1. Tana Poppino, 13.97 seconds, $4,624; 2. Kathy Grimes, 13.98, $3,963; 3. Paxton Segelke, 14.15, $3,303; 4. Alexa Lake, 14.19, $2,862; 5. Cayla Melby, 14.20, $2,202; 6. Jackie Ganter, 14.21, $1,762; 7. Lisa Thornton, 14.22, $1,321; 6. (tie) Kristen Darnell and Mary Walker, 14.23, $771 each; 10. Tori Morris, 14.25, $440. Final round: 1. Pamela Capper, 14.22 seconds, $3,425; 2. Kristen Darnell, 14.33, $2,569; 3. Jackie Ganter, 14.35, $1,713; 4. Kelley Schnaufer, 14.49, $856. Average: 1. Pamela Capper, 44.18 seconds on three runs, $6,936; 2. Jackie Ganter, 44.35, $5,945; 3. Kristen Darnell, 44.38, $4,954; 4. Kathy Grimes, 44.47, $4,2,94; 5. Tiany Schuster, 44.54, $3,303; 6. Jana Bean, 44.62, $2,642; 7. Kelley Schnaufer, 44.65, $1,982; 8. Nicole Riggle, 44.86, $1,321; 9. Mary Walker, 49.27, $991; 10. Sherry Cervi, 50.12, $661.

Bull riding: 1. Dustin Bowen, 87.5 points on Lancaster & Jones’ Total Bull Battle Born, $9,306; 2. (tie) Joseph McConnel and Shane Proctor, 86.5, $6,204 each; 4. Tim Bingham, 86, $3,412; 5. Josh Koschel, 85.5, $2,171; 5. (tie) Reagan Avery, Jeff Bertus, John Young and Kanin Asay, 84.5, $931 each.

postheadericon Bail finds the money in San Angelo

Jesse Bail, a 12-time Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifier from Camp Crook, S.D., rides Pete Carr's Classic Pro Rodeo for 82.5 points to move into a tie for fifth place in the opening round at the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo. That secures him for Friday's short go-round and gives him a shot at his third San Angelo title. (PHOTO BY TODD BREWER)

Jesse Bail, a 12-time Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifier from Camp Crook, S.D., rides Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo for 82.5 points to move into a tie for fifth place in the opening round at the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo. That secures him for Friday’s short go-round and gives him a shot at his third San Angelo title. (PHOTO BY TODD BREWER)

SAN ANGELO, Texas – It wasn’t much, but Jesse Bail needed it.

On Thursday night during the 10th performance of the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo, Bail matched moves with Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Sin Fire Kate for 82.5 points; that matched Doug Aldridge of Carthage, Mo., who rodeo Carr’s Gold Coast to share fifth place in the opening go-round. Both cowboys pocketed $671.

Jesse Bail

Jesse Bail

More importantly, they qualified for Friday’s championship round, which features the top contestants in all events from the preliminary rounds.

“I won the round on her about two months ago,” Bail said of Sin Fire Kate. “I knew it was a good horse. She stalls (coming out of the chute, but she was good and it worked out good.”

The South Dakota cowboy knows the importance of doing well in San Angelo. He won the bronc riding title in this West Texas town in 2013 and also claimed the bull riding championship in 2002.

“I haven’t had a lot of luck here, but it’s been really good at times,” he said of his tenure of competing in San Angelo. “It means a bunch, especially this year. I’ve been in San Antonio and didn’t do no good there. This is kind of the end of my winter run. I’ve got this and Tucson, so I was needing to hit a lick.”

Bail has been at this game for quite a while. He started competing in ProRodeo 19 seasons ago and first qualified for the NFR in 2000. He hasn’t been back to the sport’s grand finale since 2011, so collecting the title in San Angelo would help pave the way back to Las Vegas in December.

“I’ve been coming here for a long time, and every year this rodeo’s just gotten better and better,” Bail said. “Comparing this year to the first year I came, it’s changed a bunch for the better. It’s dang sure one of the top rodeos now, and they put on a good show.”

Doug Aldridge

Doug Aldridge

Aldridge has never qualified for the NFR, but he’s been a regular fixture among the top 30 in the world standings at the end of the season. He’s had some big victories along the way, but he’s still new to the game; he joined the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association just three seasons ago.

They’ve got some ground to make up, though. Reigning world champion Jacobs Crawley of Boerne, Texas, won the first round with an 88-point ride on Powder River Rodeo’s Rich n Fancy and owns a 5.5-point lead over Bail and Aldridge heading into the final round.

But anything can happen on championship night, and Bail knows that as well as anyone.

 

San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo
Feb. 5-7, Feb. 12-14, Feb. 17-19
Bareback riding leaders:
1. Tanner Aus, 90 points on J Bar J Rodeo’s Pass The Hat, $4,256; 2. Jake Vold and R.C. Landingham, 88, $2,837 each; 4. Caleb Bennett, 86.5, $1,560; 5. (tie) Mason Clements, Jamie Howlett and Tim O’Connell, 84.5, $757 each; 8. (tie) Luke Creasy and Jake Brown, 84, $213 each; 10. Teddy Athan, 83; 11. Clayton Biglow, 82.5.

Steer wrestling: First round leaders: 1. (tie) Josh Clark and Riley Duvall, 3.6 seconds, $3,321 each; 3. (tie) K.C. Jones, T.J. Hall, Dakota Eldridge and Heath Thomas, 3.9, $1,931 each; 7. (tie) Stan Branco and Orrin Fontenot, 4.0, $541 each. Second round leaders: 1. Jacob Talley, 3.5 seconds, $,3552; 2. (tie) Blake Knowles and Kody Woodward, 3.8, $2,857 each; 4. (tie) Clayton Tuchscherer and Mike McGinn, 3.9, $1,931 each; 6. Justin Morehouse, 4.0, $1,236; 7. (tie) Rowdy Parrott and Clint Shofner, 4.1, $541 each. Average leaders: 1. K.C. Jones, 8.2 seconds on two runs; 2. Dakota Eldridge, 8.3; 3. Riley Duvall, 8.4; 4. Justin Morehouse, 8.7; 5. Stan Branco, 8.8; 6. (tie) Nick Guy and Trevor Knowles, 9.1 each; 8. Jacob Edler, 9.5; 9. (tie) Timmy Sparing and Scott Guenthner, 9.7 each; 11. (tie) Jace Melvin and Matt Reeves, 10.0 each.

Team roping: First round leaders: 1. Adam Rose/Walt Woodard, 4.0 seconds, $3,506; 2. Colby Lovell/Will Wodfin, 4.1, $3,049; 3. Cody Snow/Dugan Kelly, 4.2, $2.592; 4. (tie) Billy Bob Brown/Garrett Jess and Bart Brunson/Zack Mabry, 4.5, $1,906 each; 6. (tie) Nathan McWhorter/Dustin Davis and Justin Davis/Zane Bruce, 4.6, $991 each; 8. (tie) Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger, Tyler Wade/Kinney Harrell and Spencer Mitchell/Justin Davis, 4.7, $102 each. Second round leaders: 1. Kolton Schmidt/Shay Carroll, 3.6 seconds, $3,506; 2. (tie) Spencer Mitchell/Justin Davis, Brady Tryan/Tommy Zuniga and Tate Kirchenschlager/Trevor Kirchenschlager, 3.9, $2,592 each; 5. (tie) Levi Simpson/Jeremy Buhler, Lane Ivy/Allen Bach, Casey Tew/John Robertson and Drew Horner/Trey Johnson, 4.0, $991 each. Average leaders 1. Spencer Mitchell/Justin Davis, 8.6 seconds on two runs; 2. (tie) Adam Rose/Walt Woodard and Colby Lovell/Will Woodfin, 8.7 each; 4. Nathan McWhorter/Dustin Davis, 9.0; 5. (tie) Billy Bob Brown/Garrett Jess and Blake Hirdes/Joseph Shawnego, 9.3 each; 7. Tyler Wade/Kinney Harrell, 9.4; 8. Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger, 9.5; 9. (tie) Brandon Webb/Mickey Gomez and Justin Davis/Zane Bruce, 9;8; 11. Kelsey Parchman, 10.0; 12. Cody Snow/Dugan Kelly, 10.6.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. Jacobs Crawley, 88 points on Powder River Rodeo’s Rich n Fancy, $3,353; 2. Allen Boore, 85.5, $2,571; 3. Rusty Wright, 85, $1,900; 4. Curtis Garton, 83, $1,229; 5. (tie) Jesse Bail and Doug Aldridge, 82.5, $671 each; 7. Joey Sonnier III, 82, $447; 8. Tyrell Smith, 81.5, $335; 9. Ryan Mackenzie, 81; 10. (tie) Brody Cress and Nick LaDuke, 80.

Tie-down roping: First round leaders: 1. Jake Pratt, 7.9 seconds, $4,106; 2. (tie) Michael Otero, Caleb Smidt and Neil Dove, 8.0, $3,035 each; 5. (tie) Garrett Hale and E.J. Roberts, 8.1, $1,696 each; 7. (tie) Chant DeForest and Ike Fontenot, 8.2, $625 each. Second round leaders: 1. Marcos Costa, 7.4 seconds, $4,106; 2. Riley Pruitt, 7.7, $3,571; 3. (tie) Timber Moore and J.D. Kibbe, 7.8, $2,767 each; 5. (tie) Hunter Herrin and Justin Macha, 7.9, $1,696 each; 7. Sterling Smith, 8.1, $893; 8. (tie) Tyler Prcin, Quay Howard and Jerrad Hofstetter, 8.2, $119 each. Average leaders: 1. Caleb Smidt, 16.7 seconds on two runs; 2. (tie) Tyler Prcin and Timber Moore, 17.4 each; 4. E.J. Roberts, 17.6; 5. Garrett Hale, 17.7; 6. Chant DeForest, 17.8; 7. Marcos Costa, 18.0; 8. (tie) Trey Young, Cody Owens and Jayce Johnson, 18.2 each; 11. Zeb Chapman, 18.4; 12. Michael Otero, 18.5.

Barrel racing: Second round leaders: 1. Tana Poppino, 13.97 seconds, $4,624; 2. Kathy Grimes, 13.98, $3,963; 3. Paxton Segelke, 14.15, $3,303; 4. Alexa Lake, 14.19, $2,862; 5. Cayla Melby, 14.20, $2,202; 6. Jackie Ganter, 14.21, $1,762; 7. Lisa Thornton, 14.22, $1,321; 6. (tie) Kristen Darnell and Mary Walker, 14.23, $771 each; 10. Tori Morris, 14.25, $440. Average leaders: 1. Kathy Grimes, 29.81 seconds on two runs; 2. Mary Walker, 29.82; 3. Pamela Capper, 29.96; 4. Jana Bean, 29.97; 5. Tana Poppino, 29.98; 6. Jackie Ganter, 30.00; 7. Tiany Schuster, 30.;04; 8. Kristen Darnell, 30.05; 9. Sherry Cervi, 30.09; 10. Kelley Schnaufer, 30.16; 11.Callie duPerier, 30.17; 12. Nicole Riggle, 30.19.

Bull riding leaders: 1. Dustin Bowen, 87.5 points on Lancaster & Jones’ Total Bull Battle Born; 2. Joseph McConnel, 86.5; 3. Tim Bingham, 86; 4. Josh Koschel, 85.5; 5. (tie) Reagan Avery, Jeff Bertus, John Young and Kanin Asay, 84.5 each.