Archive for March, 2017

postheadericon Brazile loses, regains lead

Paul David Tierney ropes his calf en route to a 53.0-second third go-round. He pocketed $3,000 for winning the round and moved into third in the aggregate at the CINCH Timed Event Championship. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Paul David Tierney ropes his calf en route to a 53.0-second third go-round. He pocketed $3,000 for winning the round and moved into third in the aggregate at the CINCH Timed Event Championship. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Saturday afternoon’s third round of the CINCH Timed Event Championship featured a lead change, but then it went right back.

Trevor Brazile held the lead since midway through Friday’s opening round and kept it until the 14th run of the 25-run event. Clay Smith, who trailed Brazile by more than 10 seconds heading into the performance, slowly made up ground and eventually overtook the seven-time champion after steer wrestling.

Smith took a 2.2-second lead heading into steer roping, but that’s one of Brazile’s specialties – he has won 23 PRCA world titles, six of which have come in steer roping. After Brazile posted a solid 15.8-second run, Smith struggled to keep his animal on the ground and finished off a 35.3-second score.

Brazile now owns a 16.6-second lead over Paul David Tierney, who won the third round with the fastest score so far, a 53.0-second round. Paul David Tierney added $3,000 to his earnings while his older brother, Jess Tierney, finished second and Brazile third. Brazile has now pocketed $7,000 so far this weekend with two more rounds remaining.

Third round: 1. Paul David Tierney, 53.0 seconds, $3,000; 2. Jess Tierney, 62.1, $2,000; 3. Trevor Brazile, 63.0, $1,000.

Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 174.0; 2. Paul David Tierney, 190.6; 3. Clay Smith, 191.3; 4. Jess Tierney, 194.5; 5. Josh Peek, 218.1.

postheadericon Kansans leap into Jr. Ironman contention

Bo Yaussi of Udall, Kan., moved into the lead in the Jr. Ironman Championship with a solid second go-round Saturday morning. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Bo Yaussi of Udall, Kan., moved into the lead in the Jr. Ironman Championship with a solid second go-round Saturday morning. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

The second round of the Jr. Ironman Championship turned into a Kansas affair at the Lazy E Arena.

Bo Yaussi of Udall jumped from third to first in the aggregate race to the $10,000 first-place prize, while J.D. Draper of Oakley slid up two spots to second. Yaussi roped, tied and wrestled four animals in 42.7 seconds Saturday morning and sits atop the standings with 95.2 seconds through eight runs.

Draper had a stronger go-round, finishing in 41.7 seconds. He has a cumulative time of 103.8 seconds, setting up the potential for a Sunflower State Showdown for Sunday morning’s final round.

New Mexican Garrett Jacobs posted the fastest round of the competition so far to win the second day with a 39.9. He pocketed $1,000.

Fastest round: Garrett Jacobs, 39.9 seconds, $1,000.

Aggregate leaders: 1. Bo Yaussi, 95.2 seconds; 2. J.D. Draper, 103.8; 4. Haven Meged, 122.9. 4. Wyatt Hansen, 159.9; 5. Garrett Jacobs, 171.2.

postheadericon Brazile starts strong opening day

Trevor Brazile closes out a heeling run Friday night during the second round of the CINCH Timed Event Championship. Brazile won both rounds and has pocketed $6,000 so far. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Trevor Brazile closes out a heeling run Friday night during the second round of the CINCH Timed Event Championship. Brazile won both rounds and has pocketed $6,000 so far. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

GUTHRIE, Okla. – The new format with the CINCH Timed Event Championship seems to be a hit amongst the cowboys.

After 32 years of paying out the fastest go-rounds at the conclusion of the five-round affair, the organizers have opted to adjust that $30,000 into the five rounds. For the first time ever, the winner of each round earns $3,000.

“I don’t have any complaints about it,” said Trevor Brazile, the only seven-time champion of the Timed Event and the winner of Friday’s first and second go-rounds. “I think it’s good for the fans to see a winner each performance, too.”

Brazile won the first round by making five runs in 56.3 seconds in heading, tie-down roping, heeling, steer wrestling and steer roping. He then posted a 54.7-second round Friday night. His 10-run cumulative time of 111.0 seconds gives him the lead heading into Saturday’s third and fourth rounds.

He is 10.7 seconds ahead of the runner-up, Clay Smith of Broken Bow, Okla. But the big part of the day was Brazile earning $6,000. He has now pocketed $785,000 in his two decades of competing at the Timed Event.

Another big change was the addition of the Jr. Ironman Championship, which kick-starts each day’s competition. Featuring 15- to 20-year-old cowboys competing in all events but steer roping, the youth championship will $1,000 a day to the winner and $10,000 to the aggregate champion.

Myles Neighbors of Benton, Ark., roped, tied and wrestled four animals in 44.7 seconds to win the inaugural round of the Jr. Ironman.

“I really think the Junior Timed Event is really good,” Brazile said. “I remember how excited I was when I was 18 and I came here to compete in this. To see the Junior Timed Event here and getting those young cowboys involved early – in being multi-event cowboys and not specializing – means a lot to me.

“I hope to see some of those guys competing in the Timed Event in a few years. It gets in their blood early and lets them not be one-dimensional. For them to be able to reap the benefits of being a multi-event cowboy is fun to see. My hat’s off to the Lazy e for involving them.”

RESULTS
First round:
1. Trevor Brazile, 56.3 seconds, $3,000; 2. Clay Smith, 61.2, $2,000; 3. Shay Carroll, 63.7, $1,000.
Second round: 1. Trevor Brazile, 54.7 seconds, $3,000; 2. Paul David Tierney, 56.5, $2,000; 3. Josh Peek, 56.7, $1,000.
Jr. Ironman: 1. Miles Neighbors, 44.7 seconds, $1,000.

postheadericon Brazile takes the first round

Seven-time champion Trevor Brazile ropes his calf in 11.5 seconds during his 56.3-second first round to win the $3,000 check. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Seven-time champion Trevor Brazile ropes his calf in 11.5 seconds during his 56.3-second first round to win the $3,000 check. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Trevor Brazile has been in this position before. In fact, nobody’s won more CINCH Timed Event Championship titles than the Texan, and he proved why Friday afternoon during the first round of this year’s “Ironman of ProRodeo.”

Brazile completed five runs in 56.3 seconds to win the opening round. In a format change, the Lazy E is paying $6,000 in each of the five rounds, so Brazile pocketed $3,000 for first place. Clay Smith, the 2014 reserve champion and a two-time NFR qualifier, was second in 61.2, worth $2,000. Shay Carroll, a newcomer to the Timed Event, is third with 63.7 seconds.

There are four rounds left to go, so the race continues to crown the champion in the 33rd edition of the Timed Event, the most unique event in rodeo.

First round: 1. Trevor Brazile, 56.3 seconds, $3,000; 2. Clay Smith, 61.2, $2,000; 3. Shay Carroll, 63.7, $1,000.

postheadericon Arkansas cowboy leads Jr. Ironman

Myles Neighbors heels during Friday's first go-round of the Jr. Ironman Championship at the Lazy E. He was assisted by Truman Mangus and stopped the clock in 14.4 seconds. He won the first round with 44.7 seconds. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Myles Neighbors heels during Friday’s first go-round of the Jr. Ironman Championship at the Lazy E. He was assisted by Truman Mangus and stopped the clock in 14.4 seconds. He won the first round with 44.7 seconds. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

The contestants in the first go-round ever in the Jr. Ironman Championships learned some valuable lessons Friday morning.

This is a rugged test of a cowboy’s talent. By the time the opening day was complete, Myles Neighbors of Benton, Ark., roped, tied and wrestled four animals in 44.7 seconds to win the first round and pocket $1,000.

More importantly, he carries a 3.4-second lead heading into Saturday’s second round, which begins at 9 a.m. Haven Meged of Miles City, Mont., sits second with 48.1, followed by Bo Yaussi in 52.3.

postheadericon Hadley Barrett 1929-2017

Hadley Barrett, Sept. 18, 1929-March 2, 2017

Hadley Barrett, Sept. 18, 1929-March 2, 2017

Nearly 18 years ago I sat down at a little restaurant in South Hutchinson, Kan., to visit with a ProRodeo legend.

In that hour and a half, I learned more about Hadley Barrett, his family and his passions. He gave me insights that I never published, but I have carried them with me for almost two decades. He was more than a source to me; he also was my friend.

Ted Harbin TwisTed Rodeo

Ted Harbin
TwisTed Rodeo

Hadley died this morning just five days after announcing the final round of the San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo. He was 87. Memorials for him have already filled social media, and the tributes will continue for many weeks ahead. He was that kind of man.

My visit with Hadley on that July 1999 day was just before the first performance of the Kansas Largest Night Rodeo in Pretty Prairie. It was just a few weeks prior to his induction into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame, a designation he rightfully deserves.

I sat with him, his wife, Lee, and our dear friend, Connie Hedrick, who was a major part of the Pretty Prairie rodeo committee. We chatted about his love affair with that rodeo, one he began announcing early in his career.

Oh, and what a career.

He has called the action at the National Finals Rodeo, the National Finals Steer Roping, the Canadian Finals Rodeo and served for many years as the NFR TV announcer. His voice and rodeo were synonymous.

He filled me in on the intricacies that come with announcing on TV and what it meant to work a rodeo horseback.  He explained what a joy it was to return to the edge of the Nebraska Sandhills to announce his hometown rodeo, the Buffalo Bill Rodeo.

I can’t begin to tell you how many big rodeos he’s worked, but I can tell you he was a class act and that he will be missed in the world of rodeo.

Cheers, Hadley Barrett. You were one of a kind.

MY STORY FROM JULY 1999 IN THE HUTCHINSON NEWS: http://www.hutchnews.com/news/time—-begins-p-m-tonight-through-saturday/article_8c621b0f-60ba-5704-9e8c-75285b6ec111.html

postheadericon Timed Event: A true sports spectacle

The greatest Western sports spectacle is the National Finals Rodeo, a 10-round championship that features only the very best from a 12-month season.

Right behind it is the CINCH Timed Event Championship, the most unique and memorable equine-based event in the world of rodeo. Twenty men. Five events. Five go-rounds. Three days.

Ted Harbin TwisTed Rodeo

Ted Harbin
TwisTed Rodeo

Now in its 33rd year, the Timed Event is a test of talent, stamina and one’s mental capacity to handle all the challenges that come his way. Trevor Brazile is always the favorite because he competes in three of the five events on a daily basis – heading, tie-down roping and steer roping.

He also has world titles in each of those disciplines, and he joins Dale Smith as the only two men to have ever qualified for the National Finals in all four roping disciplines – he earned his first team roping qualification in heeling in 1998. Oh, and he’s earned a record seven Timed Event crowns to go along with his 23 PRCA world championships.

But the field is loaded with exceptional all-around talent, including past champs like Josh Peek (1), Kyle Lockett (2), reigning champ Paul David Tierney (2), Daniel Green (3) and K.C. Jones (5).

How tough is the Timed Event? Only 12 men have ever taken the crown, and six of those are going to be at the Lazy E Arena this weekend. But they aren’t the only ones who will contend. There are some salty veterans in the mix and a few young guns that could make a whale of an impact.

But that’s what makes the Timed Event such a great championship. It all kicks off at 9 a.m. Friday with the first round of the inaugural Jr. Ironman Championship, which will include 10 cowboys ages 15 to 20 competing in all the events except steer roping.

It just adds to the excitement.

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