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postheadericon ‘The Ride’ shows Hart’s heart

July 8 episode of RFD-TV show offers a special surprise for fans, soldiers

In a bull riding and reality TV career that has seen him racing around the world, Cord McCoy has been part of hundreds of amazing things.

He did it again in early June during the J.W. Hart PBR Challenge in Decatur, Texas; more importantly, cameras were rolling, and the excitement was captured for his regular weekly viewers of “The Ride with Cord McCoy,” set to air at 1 and 11 p.m. Eastern time Monday, July 8, on RFD-TV.

Cord McCoy

Cord McCoy

“That’s pretty awesome,” said McCoy, the host of the show and a cowboy who has numerous qualifications to the PBR’s Built Ford Tough World Finals. “The J.W. Hart Invitational is something I make sure and put on my schedule every year. It’s not just because J.W. is my friend, but the crowds that are there are amazing, and so is what they put together, especially this year being their 10th anniversary.

“With what they’re doing there and what they’re showing, it’s what America’s all about.”

The show opens with McCoy working around the ranch he has with his wife, Sara, near Tupelo, Okla., as the pair load bulls into the trailer to haul on the nearly three-hour drive to Decatur – in addition to the event serving as a bull riding competition for several of the top cowboys in the game, the Hart Challenge also is a contest featuring the animal athletes that are rising stars in bull riding, too.

“Not only does J.W. bring the rankest bulls in the world and have a good payout for the bull riders, he always gives back,” McCoy said in the episode. “The bulls are in competition for themselves.

“I’ll go from loading out bulls to riding them. I’ll be working both ends of the bull riding.”

In fact, three of McCoy’s calves are shown in the competition prior to watching the cowboy attempt his ride.

“I get more nervous with these baby calves bucking than I do myself,” he said on the show.

Those are the two sides of the business for McCoy, who focuses on raising horses and bucking bulls. Now a television show host, he visited with some of the key players from this year’s Hart Challenge, including event organizers and Sgt. Jeremy Frost, a U.S. Army soldier who was injured – the video shows the prosthetic that now serves as Frost’s lower left leg.

During the Hart Challenge, five soldiers were recognized and rewarded for their service and their sacrifices. “The Ride” cameras caught the touching presentation that offers grand surprises for all.

“We sat down in the bleachers before the show, and I learned more about who he is and what he’s been through,” McCoy said, noting that Frost was the guiding force behind the generous gesture from the Wise County Challenge Charities. “He’s been in those guys shoes that are fighting for our country. He knows what this means to those guys. It’ll bring tears to your eyes.”

According to an Internet search, Frost was injured when he stepped on a bomb on July 6, 2012. He lost his left leg below the knee, suffered brain injuries, and his right leg and hip were shattered. What he was part of with the charitable organization is a powerful display of something he’s seen since he returned home.

“It shows guys like myself that the country truly does care about you,” Frost said on the show. “It reminds you that you can live.”

McCoy said he was more than inspired.

J.W. Hart

J.W. Hart

“He didn’t let that faze him one bit,” McCoy said. “I ran into him later that night, and he had a pair of jeans on and a Western shirt, and you would’ve never known he was using a prosthetic. He’s a cool guy. After you meet a guy like that, and it stokes your fire a little bit.”

And the nugget McCoy likes so much about the episode is that viewers will get to see another side to Hart, a bull rider known as “The Ironman” for his toughness and ability to weather whatever injuries he faced in order to compete at 197 consecutive Built Ford Tough Series Events. Hart’s tenacity and aggressiveness are well known in the PBR, where he is a Ring of Honor recipient.

“I thought the show was great, but it’s hard to fit the whole experience into one episode,” McCoy said. “It gives a pretty neat overview of the event, but it also shows the heart that J.W. has.

“I knew that a long time before because I got to travel with J.W. a few times. He’s done some really cool things and would just as soon not let anybody know about it.”

The secret will be revealed July 8 on “The Ride with Cord McCoy.”

postheadericon Champs stay hot in Arizona

Trevor Brazile

Trevor Brazile

Trevor Brazile and Patrick Smith aren’t satisfied with being hot.

The team roping tandem took the early lead at the Navajo Nation Fourth of July PRCA Rodeo in Window Rock, Ariz. During Tuesday’s pre-performance competition (known as slack), the Texans posted a 4.3-second run to take the early lead. They hold a four-tenths-of-a-second lead over three other teams that sit in a tie for second place.

Patrick Smith

Patrick Smith

In addition, Brazile scored an 8.7-second tie-down roping run, which, so far, is fourth. Donovan Yazzie leads with an 8.0, while the steer wrestling leader is Cooper Shofner, who posted a 3.8; Layna Kight rounded the cloverleaf pattern in 15.88 seconds to lead barrel racing.

Last week, Brazile and Smith won the Bob Feist Invitational Team Roping and the West of the Pecos (Texas) Rodeo, then placed in a round at the Reno (Nev.) Rodeo, earning more than $70,000 in seven days. Brazile also won the team roping title in Pecos, adding just shy of $5,000 to the pot.

The first performance in Window Rock begins Wednesday, and it’s a big part of the Cowboy Christmas spectacular, which features numerous lucrative rodeos around the Fourth of July holiday.

postheadericon Garcilazo bringing charro to Dodge City

Charro Tomas Garcilazo will be the featured performer at Dodge City Roundup Rodeo, set for 7:45 p.m. Wednesday, July 31-Sunday, Aug. 4. Garcilazo will bring his traditional Mexican horsemanship and put it on display for the fans at Kansas' largest rodeo. (COURTESY TOMAS GARCILAZO)

Charro Tomas Garcilazo will be the featured performer at Dodge City Roundup Rodeo, set for 7:45 p.m. Wednesday, July 31-Sunday, Aug. 4. Garcilazo will bring his traditional Mexican horsemanship and put it on display for the fans at Kansas’ largest rodeo. (COURTESY TOMAS GARCILAZO)

DODGE CITY, Kan. – Tomas Garcilazo is quite proud of who he is, from his upbringing in Mexico City to being a new citizen of the United States.

He combines it all in one of the greatest acts in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. In fact, Garcilazo was recognized as the PRCA’s Dress Act of the Year in 2012, and he will be part of the high-throttle action at the Dodge City Roundup Rodeo, set for 7:45 p.m. Wednesday, July 31-Sunday, Aug. 4, at Roundup Arena.

“I really want to thank the committee in Dodge City for bringing me in,” said Garcilazo, who recognizes the southwest Kansas community has a strong Hispanic presence. “So many Mexican people don’t get to go back to Mexico, so the committee is bringing so much of our culture back to these people.

Tomas Garcilazo

Tomas Garcilazo

“But we have something for everyone to enjoy.”

Garcilazo certainly does, and so do fans all across the country. You see, he is a charro and carries on the family heritage of La Charreria, a skill performed through the generations only by the Mexican charro. As did his elders, Garcilazo takes pride in his horsemanship and roping skills, which will be on display during each of the five performances of Roundup Rodeo.

“We are very proud of our rodeo and every person that makes up our community, and those are two reasons we wanted Tomas in Dodge City,” said Dr. R.C. Trotter, chairman of volunteer committee that produces the annual rodeo. “We recognize we have a vibrant Hispanic community, and Tomas shares a great piece of the Mexican legacy with them. But he’s the best specialty act in rodeo because he’s so talented and reaches so many people.

“We’re truly blessed to have Tomas coming to Dodge City.”

The feeling is reciprocated.

“This is going to be my first time in Dodge City,” Garcilazo said. “When you bring someone to provide a treat, it’s nice because you contribute something to the community. It’s going to bring more people together.”

Rodeo is more than a competition. Sure, Roundup Rodeo will feature the very best in the sport, from numerous world champions in every event to the very best animal athletes in the game. But it’s also an action-packed couple of hours of entertainment. To help make a rodeo even more entertaining, specialty acts provide theatrics to the competition. Garcilazo is the best at what he does, and the members of the PRCA decided that last December.

“It’s an honor because specialty acts are so competitive,” he said. “I’m very flattered that what I do as a charro and representing my culture and my tradition with my horses and myself has been recognized with those contractors, committees and contestants that are part of the PRCA.

“I emphasize the tradition a lot. The heritage is very strong. For me, it is big that those are being carried on in modern day and that it is a privilege for me to keep up with this way of life. Cattle, horses and roping were all involved in my childhood.”

Those lessons learned decades ago are still vibrant in his mind. That’s why he continues to entertain and show the world his talents.

“On my mother’s side, they are all churros,” Garcilazo said. “I grew up competing all my life. I picked my skill with a rope and had a vision to develop this with the horses.

“It’s a way of developing my dream. My rope, as a child, was a toy. Now I develop the artistry with a rope in such an extensive way. It takes time, effort, patience and the (willingness to) develop all the desires to succeed in horse and roping skills.”

It is Garcilazo’s passion to share his talent – and his heritage – with the world.

“Being in the entertainment business, you get to see the different traditions and different people from different personalities,” he said. “When you develop something with passion with your heart and express this on stage, it shows. When I see a performer, when they do these with their heart, it shows right away. I have a lot of passion for what I do, and I hope everyone sees that.”

postheadericon Pecos buckle is a nice fit for Grimes

Stacey Grimes of Kerrville, Texas, rounds the second barrel on Saturday night at the West of the Pecos Rodeo. Grimes finished in 17.28 seconds to win the barrel racing championship and the coveted title. (ROBBY FREEMAN PHOTO)

Stacey Grimes of Kerrville, Texas, rounds the second barrel on Saturday night at the West of the Pecos Rodeo. Grimes finished in 17.28 seconds to win the barrel racing championship and the coveted title. (ROBBY FREEMAN PHOTO)

PECOS, Texas – Stacey Grimes fumbled through the box carrying her West of the Pecos Rodeo championship buckle, unfastened her belt and promptly snapped the shiny trophy in place.

“It took me 130 years to win this buckle,” Grimes said jokingly, referring to the anniversary of the World’s First Rodeo and her barrel racing title.

Grimes and her mount, Jetbug, rounded the cloverleaf pattern in 17.28 seconds on Saturday night before a sold-out crowd at Buck Jackson Arena to claim the title during the final performance. It was a great way to close the five days of competition.

“I’ve finished second three times,” said Grimes, of Kerrville, Texas. I had the same horse power last year and won second. This year he was on fire and was ready to win, and thank the good Lord he did.”

With the prized buckle, Grimes claimed the $2,689 first-place prize and beat a strong field. She and Jetbug were so fast, in fact, that they were almost three-tenths of a second faster than runner-up Jana Bean of Fort Hancock, Texas – that’s an eternity in barrel racing.

The Pecos buckle is one of the most sought-after prizes in rodeo, and Grimes has been chasing it for 26 years. Her husband, Johnny, won the tie-down roping title 16 years ago, so they have something else to share.

“I get to bring it home this year, and my family is very excited,” she said. “The check’s great, too; this is one of my favorite rodeos.”

It looks to be one of Sam Powers’ favorite rodeos, too. The 19-year-old cowboy from Sonora, Texas, competed in both tie-down roping and steer wrestling Saturday; more importantly, his 4.5-second run in steer wrestling was good enough for to tie Ty Willick for second place in the second go-round. For that, he earned $1,103.

“It feels great; it’s achieving a dream,” said Powers, who entered the evening just a few dollars shy of the $1,000 in season earnings he needed on his permit in order to be eligible to purchase his ProRodeo card – in rodeo, contestants must meet a minimum requirement in money earned in order to earn the right to compete, and the permit process allows for that.

“I feel like I’m part of the family.”

He should. Powers’ grandfather served on the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association’s board of directors and owned some of the greatest steer wrestling horses in the sport for several years. His father also competed professionally, so he’s carrying a family tradition.

Powers turned 19 on May 10 and plans to purchase his PRCA card as soon as possible. He plans to return to Pecos for years to come, too.

“This gives me confidence when I come back that I can compete here,” he said. “At first it kind of scared me because it’s big and, well, it’s Pecos. But I’ll definitely be coming back to this rodeo.”

West of the Pecos Rodeo
June 26-29
Pecos, Texas
All-around champion:
Trevor Brazile, $11,271.

Bareback riding leaders: 1. Taylor Price, 88 points on Carr Pro Rodeo’s Dirty Jacket, $2,978; 2. Will Lowe, 87, $2,283; 3. Tom McFarland, 85, $1,688; 4. (tie) Caine Riddle, Trey Fisher and Steven Dent, 82, 761 each; 7. Matthew Smith, 81, $397; 8. Micky Downare, 79, $298.

Team roping: First round leaders: 1. Travis Tryan/Jake Long, 6.4 seconds, $2,003; 2. (tie) Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith and Charly Crawford/Ryan Motes, 6.8, $1,485 each; 4. (tie) Dustin Davis/Kinney Harrell and Turtle Powell/Dugan Kelly, 6.9, $794 each; 6. Bubba Buckaloo/Cole Dawson, 7.1, $345. Second round leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, 6.2 seconds, $2,003 each; 2. Chad Masters/Randon Adams, 6.8, $1,658; 3. (tie) Nick Sartain/Rich Skelton and Arky Rogers/Walt Woodard, 7.0, $1,140 each; 6. (tie) Colby Lovell/Martin Lucero and Brandon Webb/Wesley Johnson, 7.4, $484 each. Average: 1. Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, 13.0 on two runs, $3,005 each; 2. Arky Rogers/Walt Woodard, 15.0, $2,487; 3. Chad Masters/Randon Adams, 15.0, $1,969; 4. Turtle Powell/Dugan Kelly, 15.3, $1,451; 5. Derrick Begay/Cesar de la Cruz, 15.8, $933; 6. Dustin Davis/Kinney Harrell, 16.2, $518.

Steer roping: First round: 1. Walter Priestly, 12.2 seconds, $1,821; 2. Garrett Hale, 13.7, $1,507; 3. Chance Gasperson, 13.8, $1,193; 4. Reo Lohse, 14.4, $879; 5. Jason Evans, 14.9, $565; 6. Troy Tillard, 15.1, $314. Second round: 1. Dan Fisher, 12.0 seconds, $1,821; 2. Lawson Plemons, 12.2, $1,507; 3. Troy Tillard, 13.1, $1,193; 4. (tie) J. Paul Williams and Landon McClaugherty, 13.5, $722 each; 6. Rod Hartness, 13.9, $314. Third round leaders: 1. Chet Herren, 12.4 seconds, $1,821; 2. Howdy McGinn, 12.5, $1,507; 3. Chance Gasperson, 12.8, $1,193; 4. Coy Thompson, 13.3, $879; 5. Jim Davis, 13.4, $565; 6. (tie) Mike Brewer and Garrett Hale, 13.6, $157 each. Average leaders: 1. Troy Tillard, 42.2 seconds on three runs, $2,732; 2. J. Paul Williams, 47.2, $2,261; 3. Chance Kelton, 47.2, $1,790; 4. Tony Reina, 49.1, $1,319; 5. Scott Snedecor, 52.0, $847; 6. Jim Locke, 54.7, $471.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. Cody Wright, 88 points on Carr Pro Rodeo’s Deuces Wild, $3,149; 2. Jake Wright, 84, $2,414; 3. Isaac Diaz, 82, $1,785; 4. Shane Proctor, 81, $1,155; 5. Jacobs Crawley, 80, $735; 6. Jesse Bail, 79, $525; 7. (tie) Travis Sheets and Nick Laduke, 78, $367.

Tie-down roping: Tie-down roping: First round leaders: 1. Reese Riemer, 8.9 seconds, $1,700; 2. Taylor Smith, 9.1, $1,407; 3. Trevor Brazile, 9.3, $1,114; 4. (tie) Blane Cox and Fred Whitfield, 9.4, $674 each; 6. Justin Maass, 9.6, $293. Second round leaders: 1. Clint Akins, 8.2 seconds, $1,700; 2. Cade Swor, 8.3, $1,407; 3. Trevor Brazile, 8.7, $1,114; 4. Payden Emmett, 9.0, $821; 5. Kiel Rowan, 9.1, $528; 6. Marty Yates, 9.4, $293. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 18.0 on two runs, $2,550; 2. Clint Akins, 18.4, $2,222; 3. Cade Swor, 18.7, $1,671; 4. Marty Yates, 19.5, $1,231; 5. Blane Cox, 19.7, $791; 6. Will Kiker, 21.8, $440.

Steer wrestling: First round leaders: 1. Ben Shofner, 5.6 seconds, $1,488; 2. Glen Clark, 6.0, $1,231; 3. Royce Johnson, 6.3, $975; 4. Riley Duvall, 6.4, $718; 5. (tie) Chance Campbell and Bill Pace, 6.7, $359. Second round leaders: 1. 1. Grady Gray, 4.0 seconds, $1,488; 2. (tie) Ty Willick and Sam Powers, 4.5, $1,103 each; 4.Tommy Cook, 5.3, $718; 5. (tie) Cooper Shofner and Weston Taylor, 5.4, $359 each. Average leaders: 1. Ben Schofner, 12.9 seconds on two runs, $1,488; 2. Riley Duvall, 13.6, $1,231; 3. Monty Eakin, 14.3, $975; 4. Bill Pace, 14.4, $718; 5. Gary Gilbert, 15.3, $462; 6. Matt Reeves, 16.8, $257.

Barrel racing leaders: 1. Stacey Grimes,; 2. Jana Bean, 17.56, $2,285; 3. Layna Kight, 17.59, $1,882; 4. Brooke Rix, 17.83, $1,613; 5. Jaime Borrow, 17.88, $1,344; 6. Shelby Frasier, 17.91, $941; 7. (tie) Clay Sewalt and Tiffani Sonnier, 17.92, $605 each; 9. Lindsey Ewing, 17.95, $441; 10. Callie Duperier, 18.00, $403; 11. Kenna Squires, 18.01, $336; 12. (tie) 17.28 seconds, $2,689Martha Wright and Tasha Welsh, 18.02, $134 each.

Bull riding leaders: 1. Elliot Jacoby, 91 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Hustler, $4,591; 2. (tie) Ricky Aguiar and Beau Schroeder, 89, $3,054 each; 4. Chandler Bownds, 87, $1,680; 5. Shane Proctor, 86, $1,069; 6. (tie) Cameron Bland and Austin Meier, 85, $687 each; 8. Chris Roundy, 84, $458.

postheadericon Harris leads powerful list for final night in Pecos

The final night of the 130th West of the Pecos Rodeo promises a grand conclusion to an already fabulous event.

J.W. Harris

J.W. Harris

The brightest star scheduled to compete Saturday night inside Buck Jackson Arena is three-time bull riding world champion J.W. Harris. Not only has Harris been to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo each of the last seven years, he won his titles consecutively, from 2008-10.

In Pecos, he is matched against Carr Pro Rodeo’s Small Pox. Meanwhile, three-time NFR qualifier Tate Stratton has drawn Big Stan, a bull owned by Billy Jones.

They aren’t the only players ProRodeo’s grand finale who will be part of the action. They’ll be joined by bareback rider Jared Smith, who has drawn Big Lights, one of Carr’s horses that has bucked at the NFR.

In bronc riding, reigning rookie of the year Spencer Wright has drawn Carr’s Empty Pockets, also an NFR bucking horse. Wright’s oldest brother, Cody, leads the standings after an 88-point ride Friday night on Carr’s Deuces Wild. He’ll be joined by Sam Spreadborough, a two-time NFR qualifier who has Carr’s Champaign Jam, and Bradley Harter, a seven-time NFR qualifier who will match Carr’s Big Time.

Every cowboy on the list will have his hands full. In addition to Cody Wright’s lead in saddle bronc riding, Taylor Price leads bareback riding with an 88-point ride on Carr’s Dirty Jacket, and Elliot Jacoby leads bull riding with a 91 on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Hustler.

But it should be fun watching what happens next. Other leaders for the rodeo titles include team ropers Trevor Brazile and Patrick Smith, who have roped two steers in a cumulative time of 13.0 seconds; steer roper Troy Tillard, 42.2 seconds on three runs; Brazile in tie-down roping with 18.0 seconds on two runs; steer wrestler Ben Shofner, 12.9 on two; and barrel racer Jana Bean, 17.56 seconds.

postheadericon Wright bolts into the lead in Pecos

Two-time world champion Cody Wright rides Carr Pro Rodeo’s Deuces Wild for 88 points during Friday’s performance of the West of the Pecos Rodeo. He leads the rodeo with one performance remaining. (ROBBY FREEMAN PHOTO)

Two-time world champion Cody Wright rides Carr Pro Rodeo’s Deuces Wild for 88 points during Friday’s performance of the West of the Pecos Rodeo. He leads the rodeo with one performance remaining. (ROBBY FREEMAN PHOTO)

PECOS, Texas – Cody Wright likes to see his name atop the standings any time he competes.

Wright, a two-time world champion from Milford, Utah, is the No. 1 saddle bronc rider in the world standings. On Friday night during the third performance of the West of the Pecos Rodeo, he matched moves with Carr Pro Rodeo’s Deuces Wild for 88 points to take the lead with just one performance remaining.

“Anywhere you can be hot this time of year is awesome,” said Wright, whose younger brother, Jake, sits in second place in Pecos. “We just want to get on a roll and hopefully keep it rolling.

“We’ve got a lot of good rodeos coming up, and the year has just begun, I think. Of course, anytime I can win, I’m happy.”

He’s been quite happy in 2013. So far this season, he’s earned more than $55,000 has won eight titles, including a January championship in Odessa. He knows it takes a solid performance from him and his horse if he has any chance of collecting checks along the way.

“I had that horse in Lovington (N.M.); I thought he was just so-so, but I might not have rode him good,” Wright said. “I tried to ride him as good as I could, and he would up being awesome.”

That’s the winning combination, and the Wright family knows it well. Four brothers travel together – Cody, Alex and twins Jake and Jesse. All but Alex have qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, and Cody joins reigning champ Jesse as the family members who adorn gold buckles. Jake Wright posted an 84 on Carr’s Choir Girl to move into the No. 2 spot, and he’s rather tickled to have the momentum in his favor heading into the busy summer stretch of events.

“It’s awesome to do well here,” Jake Wright said. “I didn’t have the best winter. I drew decent but didn’t ride all that good. With the help of good brothers and a little bit of work, it’s all coming together.

“I wouldn’t want it to happen any other time that the Fourth of July.”

West of the Pecos Rodeo
June 26-29
Pecos, Texas
Bareback riding leaders: 1. Taylor Price, 88 points on Carr Pro Rodeo’s Dirty Jacket; 2. Will Lowe, 87; 3. Tom McFarland, 85; 4. (tie) Caine Riddle and Steven Dent, 82; 6. Micky Downare, 79; 7. Craig Wisehart, 78; 8. Bill Tutor, 74.

Team roping: First round leaders: 1. Travis Tryan/Jake Long, 6.4 seconds; 2. Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, 6.8; 3. Charly Crawford/Ryan Motes, 6.8; 4. (tie) Dustin Davis/Kinney Harrell and Turtle Powell/Dugan Kelly, 6.9; 6. Bubba Buckaloo/Cole Dawson, 7.1. Second round leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, 6.2 seconds; 2. Chad Masters/Randon Adams, 6.8; 3. (tie) Nick Sartain/Rich Skelton and Arky Rogers/Walt Woodard, 7.0; 5. (tie) Colby Lovell/Martin Lucero and Brandon Webb/Wesley Johnson, 7.4; 6. Keven Daniel/Chase Tryan, 7.6. Average: 1. Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, 13.0 on two runs; 2. Arky Rogers/Walt Woodard, 15.0; 3. Chad Masters/Randon Adams, 15.0; 4. Turtle Powell/Dugan Kelly, 15.3; 5. Derrick Begay/Cesar de la Cruz, 15.8; 6. Dustin Davis/Kinney Harrell, 16.2.

Steer roping: First round: 1. Walter Priestly, 12.2 seconds, $1,821; 2. Garrett Hale, 13.7, $1,507; 3. Chance Gasperson, 13.8, $1,193; 4. Reo Lohse, 14.4, $879; 5. Jason Evans, 14.9, $565; 6. Troy Tillard, 15.1, $314. Second round: 1. Dan Fisher, 12.0 seconds, $1,821; 2. Lawson Plemons, 12.2, $1,507; 3. Troy Tillard, 13.1, $1,193; 4. (tie) J. Paul Williams and Landon McClaugherty, 13.5, $722 each; 6. Rod Hartness, 13.9, $314. Third round leaders: 1. Chet Herren, 12.4 seconds; 2. Howdy McGinn, 12.5; 3. Chance Gasperson, 12.8; 4. Coy Thompson, 13.3; 5. Jim Davis, 13.4; 6. (tie) Mike Brewer and Garrett Hale, 13.6. Average leaders: 1. Troy Tillard, 42.2 seconds on three runs; 2. J. Paul Williams, 47.2; 3. Chance Kelton, 47.2; 4. Tony Reina, 49.1; 5. Scott Snedecor, 52.0; 6. Jim Locke, 54.7.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. Cody Wright, 88 points on Carr Pro Rodeo’s Deuces Wild; 2. Jake Wright, 84; 3. Isaac Diaz, 82; 4. Shane Proctor, 81; 5. Jacobs Crawley, 80; 6. Jesse Bail, 79; 7. (tie) Travis Sheets and Nick Laduke, 78.

Tie-down roping: Tie-down roping: First round leaders: 1. Reese Riemer, 8.9 seconds; 2. Taylor Smith, 9.1; 3. Trevor Brazile, 9.3; 4. (tie) Blane Cox and Fred Whitfield, 9.4 each; 6. Justin Maass, 9.6. Second round leaders: 1. Clint Akins, 8.2 seconds; 2. Cade Swor, 8.3; 3. Trevor Brazile, 8.7; 4. Payden Emmett, 9.0 seconds; 5. Kiel Rowan, 9.1; 6. Marty Yates, 9.4. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 18.0 on two runs; 2. Clint Akins, 18.4; 3. Cade Swor, 18.7; 4. Marty Yates, 19.5; 5. Blane Cox, 19.7; 6. Will Kiker, 21.8.

Steer wrestling: First round leaders: 1. Ben Shofner, 5.6 seconds; 2. Glen Clark, 6.0; 3. Royce Johnson, 6.3; 4. Riley Duvall, 6.4; 5. (tie) Chance Campbell and Bill Pace, 6.7. Second round leaders: 1. 1. Grady Gray, 4.0 seconds; 2. Tommy Cook, 5.3; 3. (tie) Cooper Shofner and Weston Taylor, 5.4; 5. Paul Melvin, 5.5; 6. Matt Reeves, 5.7. Average leaders: 1. Ben Schofner, 12.9 seconds on two runs; 2. Riley Duvall, 13.6; 3. Monty Eakin, 14.3; 4. Bill Pace, 14.4; 5. 6. Matt Reeves, 16.8.

Barrel racing leaders: 1. Jana Bean, 17.56 seconds; 2. Layna Kight, 17.59; 3. Jaime Borrow, 17.88; 4. Shelby Frasier, 17.91 seconds; 5. Clay Sewalt, 17.92; 6. Lindsey Ewing, 17.95; 7. Callie Duperier, 18.00; 8. Kenna Squires, 18.01; 9. (tie) Martha Wright and Tasha Welsh, 18.02; 11. Tammy Miller, 18.05; 12. Jordan Taton, 18.13.

Bull riding leaders: 1. Elliot Jacoby, 91 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Hustler; 2. (tie) Ricky Aguiar and Beau Schroeder, 89; 4. Chandler Bownds, 87; 5. Shane Proctor, 86; 6. (tie) Cameron Bland and Austin Meier, 85; 8. Chris Roundy, 84.

postheadericon McCoy is ready for ‘The Ride’

Popular cowboy kicks off second season with a look into his life, family

Cord McCoy is a professional bull rider and a reality TV star. In fact, he’s one of the most recognizable cowboys in the world because of the two.

But there’s much more to McCoy, and fans will get to see that in the next episode of “The Ride with Cord McCoy,” a weekly series that showcases the world of ranching and the Western lifestyle that airs at 1 and 11 p.m. Eastern on RFD-TV.

The Monday, July 1, episode is the first of the new season and provides viewers with a look at the life of McCoy, a cowboy who grew up his family’s ranch in the southeastern Oklahoma community of Tupelo. The show features enhanced production and a sparkling display that will give fans more to enjoy when they watch the series.

Cord McCoy

Cord McCoy

“I guess we’re really explaining again who I am, and it gets more in the day of the life of Cord McCoy,” said McCoy, the youngest of five children born to Denny and Janet McCoy, joining brothers Justin, JoRay and Jet and sister Nikki Callison. “It’s neat to be able to showcase my family. Even though Jet and I got to do “The Amazing Race, I feel there are 20 more members of my family that would do the same things that we did.

“It’s pretty cool to have a show that will open the door and showcase where I come from.”

The meat of “The Ride” is in sharing the Western lifestyle and what is involved in carrying on centuries-old traditions, and there’s no better place to start than at the host’s home.

“We take you to acclaimed ranches and show you the secrets of true horsemanship as he works with highly regarded experts,” stated a profile from the show’s website, www.CowHorseProductions.com. “From working cattle to perfecting turnarounds, you will learn techniques from the best.”

McCoy knows those techniques and can expound upon them, but as the show’s host, he provides others to explain the intricacies that come with raising livestock. In the opening show of the season, he gets a little help from some members of his family that talk about what it’s like on their ranches.

“My family was very close,” Callison said during the show. “We worked together; we played together.”

It’s that closeness that shines so brightly in the first episode, but that’s the background that has guided Cord McCoy to any success he’s had. He’s a five-time world champion in the International Professional Rodeo Association, a 2005 bull riding qualifier to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo and has qualified numerous times for the Professional Bull Riders Built Ford Tough World Championships.

“We wanted to establish who Cord is and how he got to where he is now in this episode,” said Brad Zanin, owner of Cow Horse Productions and producer of “The Ride.”

McCoy and Jet – who is just 13 months older – were part of two seasons on the reality TV series “The Amazing Race,” a marathon of around-the-world travels in which the winning two-person team claims the $1 million prize. That series put the cowboys on the international map, but it also showed the world that there is more to being a cowboy than the stereotypes that have been portrayed. It all comes back to how the McCoys live their lives.

“I think my family has definitely kept us grounded,” Cord McCoy said. “It’s equal opportunity around the ranch; everybody has the opportunity to work. I think growing up in the Western way of life, you learn that no matter how much money you have, you can’t tell a horse that or, in my line of work, a bull. Bulls can’t read buckles, and they don’t care what you’ve done.

“I think livestock keeps me grounded as well. My family works hard. We all work together, and we all work for the same goals.”

That’s rather evident in the opening episode of the season, which showcases the McCoys working – it includes gathering calves with Jet and Cord’s wife, Sara, and show’s Cord being the first to mount a newly purchased colt, handling the bucks and moves from the green horse.

Even when the show airs, it’s still about family time.

“Every Monday, I get to go over with my family and enjoy the show we filmed,” Cord McCoy said. “We get to share that with the rest of the world. It’s pretty neat to be able to go watch where we’ve been and what we’re doing.”

postheadericon Shofner closer to repeating as champ

Ben Shofner of Jasper, Texas, grapples his steer on Thursday during the second performance of the West of the Pecos Rodeo. Shofner, the reigning steer wrestling champion in Pecos, leads the two-run aggregate with a time of 12.9 seconds. (ROBBY FREEMAN PHOTO)

Ben Shofner of Jasper, Texas, grapples his steer on Thursday during the second performance of the West of the Pecos Rodeo. Shofner, the reigning steer wrestling champion in Pecos, leads the two-run aggregate with a time of 12.9 seconds. (ROBBY FREEMAN PHOTO)

PECOS, Texas – A year ago, Ben Shofner left town with the steer wrestling title at the West of the Pecos Rodeo and one of the most sought-after championship buckles in the sport.

He’s trying to win another.

On Thursday night during the second performance of the World’s First Rodeo, Shofner did just enough to move himself into first place in the two-run rodeo, downing his second steer in 7.3 seconds. That, combined with his 5.6, first-round leading run from Thursday morning, gives the Jasper, Texas, cowboy a seven-tenths of a second lead over the No. 2 man in the standings, Riley Duvall of Checotah, Okla.

“I had a steer tonight that was a little bit slower and a little bit weaker, and I kind of wadded him up,” Shofner said, referring to his having trouble grappling the steer over on its side to secure a fast time. “These steers are fresh, so you’ve just got to score good and throw them down. A lot of guys have been missing the start, so I should be alright.”

Timed-event contestants try to time their start based on how the cattle leaves the chute, and that’s referred to as scoring. In Pecos, where Buck Jackson Arena is rather large, steers and calves are provided longer head starts.

“I like it because you have to score them a little bit, and there’s still a lot of cowboy in it,” Shofner said. “I think it’s a lot better. I think a lot more bulldogging is involved in it and not so much a drawing contest.”

It seems to fit the 29-year-old cowboy quite well. He’ll await the final two performances – set for 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday – to see how the final standings play out.

Jacobs Crawley is in a similar boat. The two-time Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifier in saddle bronc riding scored 80 points Thursday night aboard Carr Pro Rodeo’s YoYo to scoot into third place in the standings in Pecos. He’s already had a solid season, sitting 17th in the world standings, but he needs a strong financial return over the coming weeks to move into the top 15 and secure a third straight trip to Las Vegas.

“This is crunch time,” said Crawley, 25, of Stephenville, Texas. “This is where you’re either going to make or break your season the next month and a half of rodeoing.”

A nice paycheck in Pecos is a good way to kick start a hectic run. He realizes he’s just half the equation; he needs to have a good dance partner to make a big score happen, and he found that in YoYo, a Carr Pro Rodeo bucking horse that has performed at the NFR.

“She had a little bit more to her than I thought going into it,” Crawley said. “It’s a bucking horse, and they can literally do anything.”

West of the Pecos Rodeo
June 26-29
Pecos, Texas
Bareback riding leaders: 1. Taylor Price, 88 points on Carr Pro Rodeo’s Dirty Jacket; 2. Will Lowe, 87; 3. Tom McFarland, 85; 4. Caine Riddle, 82; 5. Micky Downare, 79; 6. Craig Wisehart, 78; 7. Bill Tutor, 74; 8. Colt Bruce, 71.

Team roping: First round leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, 6.8 seconds; 2. Charly Crawford/Ryan Motes, 6.8; 3. (tie) Dustin Davis/Kinney Harrell and Turtle Powell/Dugan Kelly, 6.9; 5. Arky Rogers/Walt Woodard, 7.4; 6. Derrick Begay/Cesar de la Cruz, 8.1. Second round leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, 6.2 seconds; 2. Chad Masters/Randon Adams, 6.8; 3. (tie) Nick Sartain/Rich Skelton and Arky Rogers/Walt Woodard, 7.0; 5. (tie) Colby Lovell/Martin Lucero and Brandon Webb/Wesley Johnson, 7.4; 6. Keven Daniel/Chase Tryan, 7.6. Average: 1. Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, 13.0 on two runs; 2. Arky Rogers/Walt Woodard, 15.0; 3. Chad Masters/Randon Adams, 15.0; 4. Turtle Powell/Dugan Kelly, 15.3; 5. Derrick Begay/Cesar de la Cruz, 15.8; 6. Dustin Davis/Kinney Harrell, 16.2.

Steer roping: First round: 1. Walter Priestly, 12.2 seconds, $1,821; 2. Garrett Hale, 13.7, $1,507; 3. Chance Gasperson, 13.8, $1,193; 4. Reo Lohse, 14.4, $879; 5. Jason Evans, 14.9, $565; 6. Troy Tillard, 15.1, $314. Second round: 1. Dan Fisher, 12.0 seconds, $1,821; 2. Lawson Plemons, 12.2, $1,507; 3. Troy Tillard, 13.1, $1,193; 4. (tie) J. Paul Williams and Landon McClaugherty, 13.5, $722 each; 6. Rod Hartness, 13.9, $314. Third round leaders: 1. Howdy McGinn, 12.5 seconds; 2. Chance Gasperson, 12.8; 3. Coy Thompson, 13.3; 4. Jim Davis, 13.4; 5. (tie) Mike Brewer and Garrett Hale, 13.6. Average leaders: 1. Troy Tillard, 42.2 seconds on three runs; 2. J. Paul Williams, 47.2; 3. Chance Kelton, 47.2; 4. Tony Reina, 49.1; 5. Scott Snedecor, 52.0; 6. Jim Locke, 54.7.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. Isaac Diaz, 82 points on Lancaster & Pickett’s Holly Bucks; 2. Shane Proctor, 81; 3. Jacobs Crawley, 80; 4. Jesse Bail, 79; 5. Travis Sheets, 78; 6. (tie) Ty Kirkland  and Kobyn Williams, 75; 8. Leland Wood, 73.

Tie-down roping: Tie-down roping: First round leaders: 1. Reese Riemer, 8.9 seconds; 2. Taylor Smith, 9.1; 3. Trevor Brazile, 9.3; 4. (tie) Blane Cox and Fred Whitfield, 9.4 each; 6. E.J. Roberts, 9.8. Second round leaders: 1. Clint Akins, 8.2 seconds; 2. Trevor Brazile, 8.7; 3. Payden Emmett, 9.0 seconds; 4. Marty Yates, 9.4; 5. Don Coffell, 10.1; 6. Lane Dudley, 10.2. Average leaders: 1. Trevor Brazile, 18.0 on two runs; 2. Clint Akins, 18.4; 3. Marty Yates, 19.5; 4. Blane Cox, 19.7; 5. Joe Keating, 22.6; 6. Don Coffell, 22.7.

Steer wrestling: First round leaders: 1. Ben Shofner, 5.6 seconds; 2. Glen Clar, 6.0; 3. Royce Johnson, 6.3; 4. Riley Duvall, 6.4; 5. Chance Campbell, 6.7; 6. Justin Smith, 7.3. Second round leaders: 1. Tommy Cook, 5.3 seconds; 2. (tie) Cooper Shofner and Weston Taylor, 5.4; 4. Paul Melvin, 5.5; 5. Matt Reeves, 5.7; 6. Shayde Etherton, 5.8. Average leaders: 1. Ben Schofner, 12.9 seconds on two runs; 2. Riley Duvall, 13.6; 3. Monty Eakin, 14.3; 4. Matt Reeves, 16.8; 5. Glen Clark, 17.1; Chance Campbell, 22.3.

Barrel racing leaders: 1. Shelby Frasier, 17.91 seconds; 2. Shelby Frasier, 17.91; 3. Clay Sewalt, 17.92; 4. Lindsey Ewing, 17.95; 5. Kenna Squires, 18.01; 6. (tie) Martha Wright and Tasha Welsh, 18.02; 8. Tammy Miller, 18.05; 9. Jordan Taton, 18.13; 10. Natalie Bland, 18.17; 11. Tammy Fischer, 18.18; 12. Lizzy Ehr, 18.25; 10. Lisa Fernandes, 18.37.

Bull riding leaders: 1. (tie) Ricky Aguiar, on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Seminole Wind, and Beau Schroeder, on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Footloose, 89 points; 3. Shane Proctor, 86; 5. (tie) Cameron Bland and Austin Meier, 85; 6. Ross Burney, 82; 7. Ty Wallace, 80; 8. Tanner Learmont, 79.

postheadericon Thursday’s Pecos lineup is star-studded

Thursday’s second performance of the West of the Pecos Rodeo will again be chalk full of some of the brightest stars that make their living on the rodeo trail.

PecosLogoTeam roping seems to be the largest star-studded lineup, with Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifiers ready to rope. There are 14 teams set to compete in slack Thursday morning, and only the top teams will rope in the performance. But fans will get the chance to see teams like Brock Hanson and Kory Koontz; Charly Crawford and Ryan Motes; Arky Rogers and Walt Woodard; Dustin Davis and Kinney Harrell; Turtle Powell and Dugan Kelly; and Derrick Begay and Cesar de la Cruz.

Bareback riding features some tremendous match-ups, like three-time world champion Will Lowe trying his tremendous skills against two-time NFR bucking horse Outa Sight, eight-time NFR qualifier Wes Stevenson and Alberta Child and Caine Riddle vs. 2005 Bareback Horse of the Year Real Deal; all those horses are from Carr Pro Rodeo.

Bronc riding brothers Jacobs and Sterling Crawley will get to ride, as will NFR bull riders like Shawn Hogg and Cody Whitney. Bull riding also will feature to PBR cowboys Austin Meier and Skeeter Kingsolver.

There’s plenty of heat happening in Pecos, Texas, and most of it will be happening in Buck Jackson Arena.

postheadericon Schroeder successful in return to rodeo

Beau Schroeder rides Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Footloose for 89 points on Wednesday night to take the early lead at the 130th edition of the West of the Pecos Rodeo at Buck Jackson Arena in Pecos, Texas. It was Schroeder’s first bull back since he suffered a serious injury in March. (ROBBY FREEMAN PHOTO)

Beau Schroeder rides Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Footloose for 89 points on Wednesday night to take the early lead at the 130th edition of the West of the Pecos Rodeo at Buck Jackson Arena in Pecos, Texas. It was Schroeder’s first bull back since he suffered a serious injury in March. (ROBBY FREEMAN PHOTO)

PECOS, Texas – The last thing Beau Schroeder remembers from March 24 was stepping over the bucking chutes to get on his bull at the Fort Mohave (Ariz.) Xtreme Bulls Tour.

“Next thing I remember was that I woke up in a hospital with a swollen head and tied down to a bed,” said Schroeder, the reigning Wrangler National Finals Rodeo bull riding average champion from China, Texas.

During his ride in Arizona, Schroeder took the right horn to his throat and suffered a torn trachea and collapsed lungs. He needed emergency surgery to have a chance to live. He got a lot more, though.

On Wednesday night, he returned to ProRodeo during the first performance of the 130th edition of the West of the Pecos Rodeo. After mounting three practice bulls at his home, Schroeder jumped into the fray that is the summer run of rodeos.

He did it in quite the dramatic fashion, riding the Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo bull Footloose for 89 points to take the early lead in Pecos.

“I was ready to go,” Schroeder said. “I was excited to be back at a rodeo and know I was getting on something that bucks.”