postheadericon Meged finishes 2nd in Fort Scott

ALTUS, Okla. – Haven Meged has two goals in mind for the final four events of the Central Plains Region.

The primary goal is to qualify for the College National Finals Rodeo, which takes place at Casper, Wyo., in June. Only the top three contestants in each event advance out of the region, and Meged is tied for second after his run this past weekend at the Fort Scott (Kan.) Community College rodeo.

But every competitor thrives on being No. 1; winning the Central Plains would be a major step for Meged. He is tied with Northwestern Oklahoma State’s Riley Wakefield for the No. 2 spot with 385 points. They both earned big points in southeastern Kansas and moved to within 50 points of the leader, Jeremy Carney of Connor’s State College.

Haven Meged

Haven Meged

“This is going to be a very tight race,” said Meged, a sophomore at Western Oklahoma State College from Miles City, Mont. “We still have a lot of rodeos left, so I just have to keep chipping away at them.”

He did that in Fort Scott. He finished third in both the first and second rounds, with 9.6- and 9.4-second runs, respectively. His two-run cumulative time of 19.0 seconds pushed Meged to the No. 2 spot in the average.

“I just need to stay consistent, tie everything down and hope everything works.”

He secured 130 points and made up ground on the two men in front of him. Points are vital at each rodeo, because they add up to the season totals.

“Doing well this weekend helped a lot,” he said. “I missed my short-go calf in Manhattan (Kan., in February) to get some good points. I just made sure I roped my calf this weekend before I did anything else. Every point counts, because it helps to what we’ve been working for all year.

“This region is tough. There are a lot of guys that can tie them all fast. This is one of the tougher regions in college rodeo.”

Yes, it is. But Western has performed well this season. In Fort Scott, four other Western contestants earned points. Fellow tie-down roper Shane Smith was 9.3 seconds in the opening round to finish second but settled for a long time in the championship round.

The team roping tandem of Riley Morrow and Shayna VanDerLeast were third in the first round with a 7.6-second run, while goat-tier Makayla Mack finished sixth in the first round with a 7.6-second run.

“I’ve learned that nobody’s better than anybody else out here,” Meged said. “You’ve just got to go out and do the same job every time.”

It doesn’t hurt that he has a solid mentorship in coach Jess Tierney and assistant Jace Crabb. Meged also has been utilizing the expertise of an 11-time Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

“Jess has helped me by working on my mental game,” he said. “I’ve also been going to Brent Lewis’ place (near Amarillo), and he’s been helping me a bunch in calf roping.”

It’s paying off.

postheadericon Mars, Finnell lead Rangers

ALVA, Okla. – The time that Denton Mars and Chase Finnell have spent around professional rodeo cowboys is paying off at the college level.

Mars and Finnell utilized a strong short-round run this past weekend to win the team roping title at the Fort Scott (Kan.) Community College rodeo. It was a big step for the Northwestern Oklahoma State University freshman competing in their inaugural year of the Central Plains Region.

Denton Mars

Denton Mars

“We both chose Northwestern because of Frontier Rodeo,” Mars said of the three-time reigning PRCA Stock Contractor of the Year based in Freedom, Okla., a short drive from his home in Mooreland. “We work for them, so we wanted to stay close to home. It’s a good job for a college kid, and they’ve helped us a lot.”

They also have the opportunity to gather a grand education, whether it’s on the Frontier ranch or on road at Frontier rodeos.

“Getting out there when your young and learning horsemanship really helps your roping,” Mars said.

The duo has also learned to handle the challenges that come their way. Take the Fort Scott rodeo, for example. After having a long time on their first run, they won the final round by stopping the clock in 7.6 seconds. Eight of the 10 final-round were saddled with no-times, so Mars and Finnell moved up the food chain.

Chase Finnell

Chase Finnell

“I scored the (first-round) steer out a little further than we wanted,” said Finnell, a heeler from Freedom. “We caught back up, then we caught and were clean.”

That secured their spot in the short round, but they were a long way from the leaders.

“You just have to clear your head and go rope,” he said. “I just try to clear my head and have fun.”

It worked. In fact, they got a little advice from Don Gay, an eight-time world champion bull rider who serves as Frontier’s general manager.

“He said we needed to visualize winning it,” Mars said. “We were warming up and joking about how we were going to win this rodeo but not thinking we were going to win it because we were 10th.”

It turned out that the champ’s advice came in handy. But Northwestern had plenty of success in southeastern Kansas. Mars and Finnell were just two of many contestants that scored valuable points for the Rangers.

Riley Wakefield of O’Neill, Neb., won the all-around title and extended his lead in the Central Plains Region’s all-around race. He finished third in tie-down roping and fourth in steer wrestling. Cassy Woodward of DuPree, S.D., won the barrel racing title – she won the first round in 12.33 seconds, then was second in the short round with a 12.34.  Her cumulative time on two runs gave her the overall championship.

Team ropers Kass Bittle and Jaydon Loubhon were 7.1 seconds to finish third in the long round and fifth in the average, while header Dylan Schulenberg was 7.6 with his partner to finish in a tie for third in the first round and sixth in the average.

Like Wakefield, Grayson Allred scored well in tie-down roping and steer wrestling. He was fourth in tie-down roping and sixth in bulldogging. Taylor Donaldson scored a sixth-place finish in tie-down roping’s first round.

In steer wrestling, Bridger Anderson finished second in both rounds and the average, while Jace Rutledge and Colton Brown earned first-round points – Rutledge was fourth and Brown sixth.

While Woodward led the Rangers women, there were six other cowgirls who scored points. Kayla Copenhaver placed in both rounds of barrel racing, and her two-run cumulative time of 25.11 seconds pushed her to a third-place finish overall. Goat-tier Melissa Couture placed in both rounds and finished sixth in the average, while Meghan Carr finished fifth in the opening round.

Alyssa Gabrielson was fast in breakaway roping, stopping the clock in 5.9 seconds in two runs to finish second. Taylor Munsell also placed in both rounds to finish fourth in the average Brittany Cudworth was 2.7 seconds to finish in a tie for third place in the long round with Gabrielson.

For Mars and Finnell, Fort Scott was the culmination of their years working together and roping together. The two started roping together in high school, and they’ve carried over a solid bond to the collegiate level.

“I’ve roped with quite a few people over the years, but it’s a lot easier to rope with somebody and learn with somebody,” Mars said. “I’ve been his partner ever since he started roping. I’ve never roped better with anybody else. We’re just growing on each other and getting better together.”

postheadericon Egger takes on rodeo role

GUYMON, Okla. – This community in the middle of the Oklahoma Panhandle has a proud tradition.

For decades, Guymon has hosted the annual Pioneer Days Celebration, honoring the history of the people who developed this region that was once known as No Man’s Land. Mitch Egger knows that history. He was born and raised in Guymon and, for all but three years, has made it his home.

“From a historical value, Pioneer Days Rodeo has always meant something special to the people around here,” said Egger, a financial adviser for Edward Jones in Guymon. “It’s tradition. I think so many people in this area make money through agriculture, so it’s important that we honor that tradition.”

Mitch Egger

Mitch Egger

Egger is the new chairman for the rodeo, set for 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 4; 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 5; and 2 p.m. Sunday, May 6, at Henry C. Hitch Pioneer Arena.

By taking the reins of the volunteer committee, he is bringing together several aspects of his life. As a financial planner, he understands the need for fiscal responsibility. As a former cowboy at Hitch Ranch, he knows the importance of animal agriculture to this community. As a farrier, he continues to live the Western way of life.

“Mitch is a very successful businessman who grew up in this community,” said Ken Stonecipher, a former rodeo chairman who has served on the committee for more than two decades. “He cares very much about Guymon.  He’s organized and committed to making things right.”

Yes, he is. He is back for a second go-round with the rodeo committee. He first served on the committee two decades ago, handing many of the behind-the-scenes details that come for the volunteers on the committee. He knows what it means to organize the livestock and prepare the arena. Most importantly, he knows what it means to volunteer.

“Volunteers are what make our rodeo happen,” Egger said. “I don’t think everybody realizes how much it takes to put on a rodeo, and all the work that’s done comes from the volunteers. It is so important that people volunteer to be part of the committee and will be willing to donate their time and talents to this venture.”

It’s quite an undertaking. The committee not only prepares the community and sponsors for seven days of competition, but it also has to get the arena ready for nearly 1,000 contestants who will battle for one of the most prestigious titles in Oklahoma. This is Oklahoma’s richest rodeo, which has been enshrined in the ProRodeo Hall of Fame.

“With a committee made up of volunteers, one of the most important things as chairman is to get more volunteers,” Stonecipher said. “He knows he needs to keep people interested, committed and engaged in the work that the committee does.”

Egger comprehends that. He hopes to keep all the volunteers involved. When the last study was done, the economic impact of that Pioneer Days weekend was $2 million. That’s a financial boon to the Guymon community and Texas County.

“For me, one of the things about Pioneer Days is bringing the community together,” said Egger, who has three children – Briana, Addie and Cabe – with Jessica, his wife of 23 years. “I remember as a kid watching the rodeo, which is an attempt, in some form, to keep the cowboy spirit alive. I think it brings the community together.”

It’s that type of reflection that makes Egger the perfect fit for the committee. He brings a ton of experience and a boatload of talent to the group of volunteers.

“He understands not only the heritage of rodeo as a sport but has the knowledge of what rodeo means to this community,” Stonecipher said. “Mitch worked at Hitch Ranch and has shod horses for years. The first thing you have to bring to that job is the passion for the community and for the sport of rodeo.

“When those things come together, it just bodes well for Guymon Pioneer Days Rodeo.”

postheadericon Schueth returns in Scottsdale

After five months on the injured list, Beau Schueth returns to Bullfighters Only action Thursday in Scottsdale, Ariz. He will be in the mix with Kris Furr and Noah Krepps. (TODD BREWER PHOTO)

After five months on the injured list, Beau Schueth returns to Bullfighters Only action Thursday in Scottsdale, Ariz. He will be in the mix with Kris Furr and Noah Krepps. (TODD BREWER PHOTO)

Nebraska talent is back in BFO competition after being sidelined by injury

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – Beau Schueth last competed on the Bullfighters Only tour five months ago in Austin, Texas, where he suffered broken bones in his foot.

Now he returns to the Wrangler Bullfights at Rodeo Scottsdale on Thursday, and he hopes to show just how hungry he’s been.

“The injury was pretty bad timing, because I was third in the world standings,” said Schueth of O’Neill, Neb. “I needed to do good in Austin to have a shot to chase down Toby (Inman) and Weston (Rutkowski) for the world title; the injury kind of messed up that deal.

“Now I’ve got to build from ground zero, and hopefully I can start it off right in Scottsdale.”

He will be part of a three-man bullfight at the Parada del Sol, joining Kris Furr and Noah Krepps. It’s a true battle of man vs. beast, with the bullfighters showcasing their athleticism in the face of Spanish fighting bulls from Manuel Costa.

The animals are bred specifically for bullfighting, and they are aggressive, athletic and agile. They can turn on a dime, and it’s up to the men to utilize their skills to stay as close to the bulls as possible.

“My foot feels pretty good,” Schueth said. “I’m just getting back into fighting shape. Now it’s about getting my mind back to freestyling; I haven’t done it since October.”

While he has been working in cowboy protection at some bull ridings, there’s something much different about facing a Spanish fighting bull. But the contestants know what to expect when Schueth is in the mix.

“I’m sure he’s been craving it, and I think he’s going to be swinging for the fences,” said Kris Furr, who is coming off a second-place finish at the Wrangler Bullfights in San Antonio. “It’s going to be a tough competition with him back.

“I work a lot of rodeos in Arizona, and the people there are awesome. They love rodeo. I think this is the first time they’ve had the BFO in Arizona, so it will be cool to be a part of it.”

CONTESTANTS
Kris Furr
Beau Schueth
Noah Krepps

postheadericon Ketscher catches big check

Jordan Ketscher finishes off a tie-down roping run during Sunday's final round of the CINCH Timed Event Championship. Ketscher became the 14th cowboy in the 34-year history of the contest to win the title. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Jordan Ketscher finishes off a tie-down roping run during Sunday’s final round of the CINCH Timed Event Championship. Ketscher became the 14th cowboy in the 34-year history of the contest to win the title. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

California cowboy claims prestigious CINCH Timed Event Championship

GUTHRIE, Okla. – Jordan Ketscher is the 14th man in the 34-year history of the CINCH Timed Event Championship to claim the prestigious title.

With it, he became the first Californian in five years to win the “Ironman of ProRodeo.”

“I’ve always watched this event, and just to be here and be part of the greats – Trevor (Brazile), Cash (Myers) and Kyle (Lockett) – is a dream come true,” said Ketscher, 28, of Squaw Valley, Calif.

He roped, wrestled and tied 25 animals in a cumulative time of 324.3 seconds to win the title, finishing 19.1 seconds faster than the runner-up, Clayton Hass of Stephenville, Texas; the three-time National Finals Rodeo qualifier in steer wrestling had his best run at the Timed Event after many years competing at the Lazy E Arena the opening weekend of March.

Jordan Ketscher earned $100,000 and other prizes for his title (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Jordan Ketscher earned $100,000 and other prizes for his title (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

“This meant a lot, because I didn’t get to come here last year because of a conflict with a Champions Challenge event,” Hass said, referring to a PRCA event in which he was contractually obligated to compete. “I got a chance to come back and prove that I’m supposed to be here.

“This is a bit of redemption I’ve placed here a few times, and to stay solid through all 25 head means a lot.”

Ketscher entered Sunday’s fifth and final round as the No. 1 man, but he had just a 7.1-second lead on Myers, who moved to third after the first discipline of the day, heading. Brazile, the Timed Event’s only seven-time winner, posted a 6.7-second run to move into the runner-up position.

Myers then fell all the way to sixth after suffering a 60-second penalty in tie-down roping when his calf got up from the tie before the required 6 seconds – a 60 is equivalent to a no-time at a traditional rodeo. An event later, Brazile joined him after losing his dally in heeling.

The standings shuffle continued through the final performance of the five-round affair. When the competition ended, the top two men took the biggest prizes.

“It always helps to have $25,000,” Hass said, referring to his substantial second-place earnings. “The winter has been pretty good, but it could always be better. Now I’m just trying to move on throughout the year and make the NFR.”

So, what brought the Texan the most pride in his performance over the weekend?

“The fact that I used my head, and I feel like I stayed focused,” he said. “Even when I had hiccups, I didn’t back off. I just roped my game.”

Ketscher has never been to the NFR, but he performed at an optimum level through the three days of competition, where cowboys battle the mental and physical challenges that come with the “Ironman.”

“This is just so awesome,” he said of the event. “Everybody specializes in different events, so you’ve got to come here and do something you’re not comfortable with. It’s just a marathon.”

He held the lead through much of the three-day championship and showed just why consistency is important in this game. And on the final day, when the thoughts of that big check came into his mind, he had to push them away and focus on the task at hand.

“I was trying not to overthink things, and I was just wanting to make every run like I had done the four previous rounds,” Ketscher said. “I wanted to trust myself and trust my horses to make it happen.”

He will return a year from now as the reigning champion.

“I’m going to go home and work on a few things,” he said. “It’s going to be just as tough next year. There’s no need to slack off.

“Things happen here, and that’s what the Timed Event is all about. Anytime, as a cowboy, that you get a chance at $100,000, you have to love the opportunity.”

Myers did pick up a nice prize. His horse, Diesel, was named the AQHA CINCH Timed Event Championship Top Horse.

The 2018 CINCH Timed Event Championship partners include CINCH – Jeans and Shirts, Priefert – Farm, Ranch & Rodeo, YETI Coolers, Montana Silversmiths, ABI Equine, RAM, RIDE TV, Carroll Original Wear, Big Tex Trailers, P&K Equipment, Cavender’s, Nutrena, The Team Roping Journal,  MacroAir, Bio S.I., National Saddlery, Cross Bar Gallery, John Vance Auto Group, Pendleton Whisky, CSI Saddle Pads, Formula 1 Noni, Guthrie CVB, Made In Oklahoma Coalition, J.W. Brooks Hat Co., Hilton Garden Inn – Edmond, America’s Best Value Inn – Guthrie,  Sherwin-Williams, Anderson Bean Boot Co., Chris Neal’s Future Stars and Rising Stars Calf Ropings, and the National Little Britches Rodeo Association.

The 2018 CINCH Timed Event Championship is a Lazy E Production. For more information on the CINCH Timed Event Championship or other Lazy E events, contact the Lazy E Arena, 9600 Lazy E Drive, Guthrie, OK  73044, (405) 282-RIDE, (800) 595-RIDE or visit www.lazye.com.

RESULTS
First round: 1. Cash Myers, 51.8 seconds, $3,000; 2. Trevor Brazile, 65.1, $2,000; 3. Russell Cardoza, 67.7, $1,000.
Second round: 1. Erich Rogers, 55.0 seconds, $3,000; 2. JoJo LeMond, 59, $2,000; 3. Jordan Ketscher, $1,000.
Third round: 1. Jordan Ketscher, 56.0 seconds, $3,000; 2. Trevor Brazile, 57.6, $2,000; 3. Clayton Hass, 57.9, $1,000.
Fourth round: 1. Cash Myers, 51.0 seconds, $3,000; 2. Marcus Theriot, 51.3, $2,000; 3. Clayton Hass, 55.0, $1,000.
Fifth round: 1. Russell Cardoza, 53.3 seconds, $3,000; 2. Shank Edwards, $2,000; 3. Lane Karney, 60.1, $1,000.
Average leaders: 1. Jordan Ketscher, 324.3 seconds on 25 runs, $100,000; 2. Clayton Hass, 343.4, $25,000; 3. Marcus Theriot, 379.9, $15,000; 4. Lane Karney, 386.1, $10,000; 5. JoJo LeMond, 398.9, $7,500; 6. Kyle Lockett, 403.4, $5,000; 7. Cash Myers, 406.9, $4,500; 8. Trevor Brazile, 408.3, $3,000.

postheadericon Neighbors takes the title

Myles Neighbors of Benton, Ark., poses with his check for winning the Jr. Ironman Championship. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Myles Neighbors of Benton, Ark., poses with his check for winning the Jr. Ironman Championship. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Arkansas cowboy earns $11,000 while claiming the Jr. Ironman Championship

GUTHRIE, Okla. – The biggest attribute for cowboys competing in multiple events is being consistent through the contest.

Myles Neighbors was the most consistent through his three days at the Jr. Ironman Championship, which led to his title and the first-place check worth $10,000. He roped, wrestled and tied 12 animals in 167.8 seconds to claim the title.

“This is a marathon, not a sprint,” said Neighbors, 19, of Benton, Ark., repeating the adage passed on by longtime contestants of the CINCH Timed Event Championship. “You’ve got to keep knocking them down. Even if you break a barrier, you just don’t take a 60. If you don’t take a 60, you’ll be the champ.”

In this unique competition – where the 10 cowboys compete in heading, heeling, tie-down roping and steer wrestling in each round – a 60-second run is equivalent to a no-time at a traditional rodeo. The Arkansas cowboy was the only man in the field who didn’t suffer that penalty. In fact, his longest run came Sunday morning’s final round, when he stopped the clock in 31.1 seconds in heeling.

“I think the key was my horsepower and consistency,” he said. “You’ve got to have horsepower here. You’ve got the score them, you’ve got to run them down, and you’ve got to be consistent. You’ve got to catch everything.”

Myles Neighbors roped his third calf of the weekend in 12.5 seconds, and that was one of the 12 runs that guided him to the Jr. Ironman title. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Myles Neighbors roped his third calf of the weekend in 12.5 seconds, and that was one of the 12 runs that guided him to the Jr. Ironman title. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

He also needed things to go his way. Heading into the final event of the weekend, Neighbors was in second lace and trailed leader Wyatt Hansen of Oakdale, Calif., by 30.4 seconds. But Hansen struggled in steer wrestling and suffered his first 60 of the weekend.

That pushed Neighbors to the top spot when it counted most. Hansen fell to second place, while the reigning champion, Bo Yaussi of Udall, Kan., finished third.

A year ago, Neighbors won the opening round but fell off the pace through the end. He took the lessons gained 12 months ago into account while chasing the championship.

“I found out I needed to start reading my cattle a lot better, knowing what my cattle are supposed to do,” said Neighbors, who is attending Northeast Texas Community College on a rodeo scholarship. “This is easily the biggest thing I’ve ever won. This is an opportunity we don’t have very often. This is a one-of-a-kind deal for us. We don’t get to run at $10,000 every day.”

In all, he pocketed $11,000, adding the $1,000 prize for winning Saturday’s second round. Yaussi won the first round, while Ryder Ladner of Kiln, Miss., posted the fastest round of the weekend, 36.6 seconds, to win Sunday.

For the second straight year, Chance, the steer wrestling horse owned by J.D. Draper of Oakley, Kan., earned the AQHA Jr. Ironman Top Horse Award.

The 2018 CINCH Timed Event Championship partners include CINCH – Jeans and Shirts, Priefert – Farm, Ranch & Rodeo, YETI Coolers, Montana Silversmiths, ABI Equine, RAM, RIDE TV, Carroll Original Wear, Big Tex Trailers, P&K Equipment, Cavender’s, Nutrena, The Team Roping Journal,  MacroAir, Bio S.I., National Saddlery, Cross Bar Gallery, John Vance Auto Group, Pendleton Whisky, CSI Saddle Pads, Formula 1 Noni, Guthrie CVB, Made In Oklahoma Coalition, J.W. Brooks Hat Co., Hilton Garden Inn – Edmond, America’s Best Value Inn – Guthrie,  Sherwin-Williams, Anderson Bean Boot Co., Chris Neal’s Future Stars and Rising Stars Calf Ropings, and the National Little Britches Rodeo Association.

The 2018 CINCH Timed Event Championship is a Lazy E Production. For more information on the CINCH Timed Event Championship or other Lazy E events, contact the Lazy E Arena, 9600 Lazy E Drive, Guthrie, OK  73044, (405) 282-RIDE, (800) 595-RIDE or visit www.lazye.com.

RESULTS
Jr. Ironman first round:
1. Bo Yaussi, 42.3 seconds, $1,000.
Jr. Ironman second round: 1. Myles Neighbors, 42.3 seconds, $1,000.
Jr. Ironman third round: 1. Ryder Ladner, 36.6 seconds, $1,000.
Jr. Ironman average leaders: 1. Myles Neighbors, 167.8 seconds, $10,000; 2. Wyatt Hansen, 193.2, $5,000; 3. Bo Yaussi, 197.1, $2,000.

postheadericon Ketscher returns to CTEC lead

Jordan Ketscher of Squaw Valley, Calif., makes his heeling run during Saturday evening's fourth round. He leads the CINCH Timed Event Championship heading into Sunday's final round. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Jordan Ketscher of Squaw Valley, Calif., makes his heeling run during Saturday evening’s fourth round. He leads the CINCH Timed Event Championship heading into Sunday’s final round. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

GUTHRIE, Okla. – The CINCH Timed Event Championship is one of the most demanding games in Western sports, and Saturday proved that.

One-time leader Erich Rogers was taken out of competition during Saturday afternoon’s third go-round, when he injured his right knee in steer wrestling. He competed in the fourth round, but only in heading and heeling – the two disciplines where he didn’t have to dismount.

But that opened the door for others who have remained steady and consistent through the first 20 runs of this year’s championship, namely Californian Jordan Ketscher. He held onto the lead through the fourth go-round, posting a cumulative time of 250.5 seconds. He has a 7.1-second lead over the No. 2 man, Cash Myers, who entered the second day of competition in the No. 1 spot.

Cash Myers makes his heading run Saturday night. He posted the fastest round, a 51.0, and moved into second place in the average after four rounds. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Cash Myers makes his heading run Saturday night. He posted the fastest round, a 51.0, and moved into second place in the average after four rounds. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

“I just wanted to stay consistent through the day,” said Ketscher, 27, of Squaw Valley, Calif. “In the back of your mind, you want to maintain the lead, and that sends you a little nerves. But you just can’t think about it.”

Obviously, it’s working. Ketscher is competing for just the second year; he finished sixth in the average last March. He’s playing the game like a veteran; in fact, he’s leading a flock of veterans, including Myers and Trevor Brazile, the only seven-time winner of this championship who sits in third place heading into the final five rounds.

“It’s pretty incredible to watch Trevor for five rounds,” Ketscher said. “The mental side of it is pretty tough. Even though I’ve not had a big wreck, but I’m still sore. It’s 10 head a day, the toughest stock. You’re scoring, running and bulldogging, so you’ve got to get your rest.

“Now that I’m trying to maintain a level, but you’ve also got to realize what got you to this point.”

Myers understands the roller coaster that happens with the Timed Event. He fell out of the top 5 Saturday, but has returned to contention heading into the final round.

“I had good cattle tonight, and the horses did good,” said Myers of Athens, Texas. “I just tried to be solid. A couple of guys that were in it ahead of me had trouble, but I had a good steer roping steer. I had good draws tonight. My heeling steer ran, but my partner, Tyler Worley, did a good job.

“My bulldogging steer was a little stronger, but it fit be being a bulldogger.”

Now he runs into the final day of the 2018 championship with a legitimate chance to win the title.

“Whether you’re a spectator or your entered, this is an awesome event,” he said. “I’ve done terrible here, and I’ve still enjoyed it. I get to run five more here, and we’ll see how it goes.

In the Jr. Ironman, leader and reigning champion Bo Yaussi suffered a 60-second penalty in the final event of the day, steer wrestling, and dropped out of the top three. Myles Neighbors of Benton, Ark., won the second round in 42.3 seconds and holds the best cumulative time through eight runs, a 98.2, just less than five seconds ahead of the No. 2 man, Wyatt Hensen of Oakdale, Calif.

RESULTS
Third round: 1. Jordan Ketscher, 56.0 seconds, $3,000; 2. Trevor Brazile, 57.6, $2,000; 3. Clayton Hass, 57.9, $1,000.
Fourth round: 1. Cash Myers, 51.0 seconds, $3,000; 2. Marcus Theriot, 51.3, $2,000; 3. Clayton Hass, 55.0, $1,000.
Average leaders: 1. Jordan Ketscher, 250.5 seconds; 2. Cash Myers, 257.6; 3. Trevor Brazile, 256.2; 4. Clayton Hass, 266.6; 5. Kyle Lockett, 283.5.
Jr. Ironman second round: 1. Myles Neighbors, 42.3 seconds, $1,000; 2. Wyatt Hansen, 43.3; 3. J.D. Draper, 49.4.
Jr. Ironman average leaders: 1. Myles Neighbors, 98.2 seconds on eight runs; 2. Wyatt Hansen, 103.1; 3. J.D. Draper, 113.2.

postheadericon Ketscher survives to take CTEC lead

Jordan Ketscher slides with his animal during his 6.8-second steer wrestling run. He won the third go-round of the CINCH Timed Event Championship with a 56.0-second round and also moved into the 15-run aggregate lead. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Jordan Ketscher slides with his animal during his 6.8-second steer wrestling run. He won the third go-round of the CINCH Timed Event Championship with a 56.0-second round and also moved into the 15-run aggregate lead. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

GUTHRIE, Okla. – It was a wild third round of the CINCH Timed Event Championship, and Jordan Ketscher of Squaw Valley, Calif., survived and moved into the lead.

The round featured three lead changes, a knee injury to then-leader Erich Rogers that took him from No. 1 to seventh in the 15-run aggregate. Ketscher, who has been one of the most consistent contestants in the field this weekend, finished his five-run afternoon in 56.0 seconds to win the round and add $3,000.

He is followed by Trevor Brazile, the only seven-time winner of the “Ironman of ProRodeo;” Cash Myers, the leader heading into the day; Clayton Hass, who was an injury replacement; and Kyle Lockett, a two-time winner.

In the Jr. Ironman, leader and reigning champion Bo Yaussi suffered a 60-second penalty in the final event of the day, steer wrestling, and dropped out of the top three. Myles Neighbors of Benton, Ark., won the second round in 42.3 seconds and holds the best cumulative time through eight runs, a 98.2, just less than five seconds ahead of the No. 2 man, Wyatt Hensen of Oakdale, Calif.

RESULTS
Third round:
1. Jordan Ketscher, 56.0 seconds, $3,000; 2. Trevor Brazile, 57.6, $2,000; 3. Clayton Hass, 57.9, $1,000.
Average leaders: 1. Jordan Ketscher, 189.4 seconds; 2. Trevor Brazile, 205.6; 3. Cash Myers, 206.6; 4. Clayton Hass, 227.4; Kyle Lockett, 231.9.
Jr. Ironman second round: 1. Myles Neighbors, 42.3 seconds, $1,000; 2. Wyatt Hansen, 43.3; 3. J.D. Draper, 49.4.
Jr. Ironman average leaders: 1. Myles Neighbors, 98.2 seconds on eight runs; 2. Wyatt Hansen, 103.1; 3. J.D. Draper, 113.2.

postheadericon Myers, Rogers are 1-2 after Day 1

Eric Rogers transitions to his bulldogging steer en route to a 4.3-second run, which helped him to a second-round winning 55.-second go-round during Friday night's performance of the CINCH Timed Event Championship. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Eric Rogers transitions to his bulldogging steer en route to a 4.3-second run, which helped him to a second-round winning 55.-second go-round during Friday night’s performance of the CINCH Timed Event Championship. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

GUTHRIE, Okla. – The lead changes on opening day of the CINCH Timed Event Championship resembled a Final Four basketball game.

By the time Friday night’s second round came to an end, Texan Cash Myers remained at the top of the list by knocking down 10 animals in a cumulative time of 121.9 seconds, but Navajo cowboy Erich Rogers has placed himself in a solid No. 2 spot with 128.7.

The two cowboys also were the round winners on Day 1 – Myers has the fastest of the day by winning the first round in 51.8 seconds, while Rogers was 55 seconds to win the evening performance. Each man earned $3,000 by doing so.

“This is one of my best starts,” said Myers of Athens, Texas. “I’ve gone into the final round in the lead, but really, there’s only one time when it’s good to go ahead in the race is when it’s over.

“It’s a good start, and I’m real pleased. The horses and the helpers have been really good.”

Rogers echoed those sentiments.

“I’ve paid my entry fee by winning the round, so now I’ve got to pay the traveling expenses and my help. There have been a lot of people that have helped.”

That includes his best friend, 2015 world champion header Aaron Tsinigine, and four-time steer wrestling world champion Ote Berry, who has allowed Rogers to borrow a bulldogging horse while Berry has served as his hazer. In fact, Rogers’ second-round time was aided by the fastest steer wrestling run of the Timed Event so far, 4.3 seconds.

“They have all done a great job for me,” he said. “Those guys are all behind me and support me.”

A decade ago, Myers was a regular in this field of 20 all-around cowboys, who must compete in each of the five timed-event disciplines to finish a round. Though he’s been away from the game for the better part of the last eight years, he’s excited to be in the mix again. He has a lot of the tools necessary to do well; he has qualified for the National Finals in steer wrestling, tie-down roping and steer roping, which make up three of the five.

“I’ve done those three events in my career, but we team rope a bunch at home,” said Myers, who missed last year’s “Ironman of ProRodeo” because of an injured knee, which kept him away from competition for much of the year. “Having to recover from the injury last year was a blessing in some ways. I couldn’t rope (calves) and bulldog, so I team roped a bunch.

“It’s a long process. During some part of the year, you’re working on something for the Timed Event. The last three weeks, I’ve had some good practices.”

It’s showed in the opening two rounds, but three more remain. The third round will begin at noon Saturday.

During Friday’s opening round of the Jr. Ironman, reigning champion Bo Yaussi of Udall, Kan., roped, wrestled and tied four animals in 42.3 seconds to win $1,000 – the younger competitors do not compete in steer roping. He owns a 13.6-second lead over the No. 2 man, Myles Neighbors of Benton, Ark.

The weekend features 20 of the greatest all-around cowboys in ProRodeo and 10 of the top up-and-coming stars in the game. Now in its 34th year, it’s become a Lazy E Arena staple.

“I love this event,” Myers said. “They have great crowds, and this is a great venue. I probably like this event more than the NFR.”

RESULTS
First round: 1. Cash Myers, 51.8 seconds, $3,000; 2. Trevor Brazile, 65.1, $2,000; 3. Russell Cardoza, 67.7, $1,000.
Second round: 1. Erich Rogers, 55.0 seconds, $3,000; 2. JoJo LeMond, 59, $2,000; 3. Jordan Ketscher, $1,000.
Average leaders: 1. Cash Myers, 121.9 seconds on 10 runs; 2. Erich Rogers, 128.7; 3. JoJo LeMond, 133.1; 4. Jordan Ketscher, 133.4; 5. Russell Cardoza, 144.1.
Jr. Ironman first round: 1. Bo Yaussi, 42.3 seconds, $1,000; 2. Myles Neighbors, 55.9; 3. Wyatt Hansen, 59.8.

postheadericon Myers leads after Round 1

Cash Myers won the first round of the 2018 CINCH Timed Event Championship with a 51.8-second run. He has a 13.3-second lead over the No. 2 man, Trevor Brazile. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

Cash Myers won the first round of the 2018 CINCH Timed Event Championship with a 51.8-second run. He has a 13.3-second lead over the No. 2 man, Trevor Brazile. (JAMES PHIFER PHOTO)

It’s been a couple years since Cash Myers last competed in the CINCH Timed Event Championship. It’s been a half dozen years since he was a regular.

On Friday afternoon, He roped, wrestled and tied five animals in 51.8 seconds to win the opening go-round of this year’s “Ironman of ProRodeo.” For that, he earned $3,000. What’s even bigger is that he owns a 13.3-second lead over the No. 2 man, Trevor Brazile.

But Brazile is the only seven-time winner of the Timed Event, and there are four more go-rounds remaining. Myers isn’t comfortable with his lead, but he’s happy with his start to this year’s championship.

First round: 1. Cash Myers, 51.8 seconds, $3,000; 2. Trevor Brazile, 65.1, $2,000; 3. Russell Cardoza, 67.7, $1,000.

Jr. Ironman first round: 1. Bo Yaussi, 42.3 seconds, $1,000; 2. Miles Neighbors, 55.9; 3. Wyatt Hansen, 59.8.

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