postheadericon BFO stars head to Florida

Toby Inman goes toe-to-toe against a fighting bull during a freestyle fight in Las Vegas this past December. Inman will be one of nine men competing this weekend at the Bullfighters Only event in Brighton, Fla. (TODD BREWER PHOTO)

Toby Inman goes toe-to-toe against a fighting bull during a freestyle fight in Las Vegas this past December. Inman will be one of nine men competing this weekend at the Bullfighters Only event in Brighton, Fla. (TODD BREWER PHOTO)

Bullfighters Only begins new season with its first event ever in Sunshine State

BRIGHTON, Fla. – The Brighton Field Day Festival has a long history of exciting events, with 79 years of extreme entertainment.

The organizers of the Field Day Festival and PRCA Rodeo are adding to that this year with three days of Bullfighters Only freestyle bullfighting competition. It takes place Friday through Sunday at Fred Smith Rodeo Arena and will feature nine of the top freestyle bullfighters in the world.

“We have a lot of activities with our festival, and Bullfighters Only is a perfect fit for what we produce,” said Marvin Hines of the Seminole Tribe. “We are pulling out all the stops to make this the best freestyle event Florida has seen to date. It’s going to be great.”

The Brighton event will kick off BFO’s 2017 season and is one of three events planned for this weekend. Bullfighters Only will also host events in Red Deer, Alberta, and San Angelo, Texas, on Saturday.

WAR Fighting Bulls from Texas will provide the challengers that the fighters will face in hopes of claiming a lion’s share of the $10,000 payout. BFO paid upwards of $300,000 in prize money during the inaugural 2016 season.

“I’m looking forward to visiting new towns and taking advantage of new opportunities,” said Toby Inman of Davis Junction, Ill. “Obviously getting back to places where we’ve been will be awesome, but this is a new year, and we are adding to our tour.

“The fans are going to love what Bullfighters Only brings to the table.”

Bullfighters Only has been growing freestyle bullfighting for the past two years. After 17 years away from the spotlight, freestyle bullfighting has surged back to the mainstream thanks to the presence of the BFO. The sport continues to grow.

“This will be our first event in Florida,” Weston Rutkowski said. “The Sunshine State is very rodeo-savvy the fans will hold you accountable for your performance in the arena – good or bad.”

A big part of Bullfighters Only’s success lies within the heart-stopping action that comes with the extreme danger in freestyle bullfighting. Men will try to stay within inches of the bulls, which are bred to be part of this type of fight. The most successful will keep the animal engaged closely while showcasing true athleticism to stay out of harm’s way.

At Brighton, Rutkowski and Inman will be joined by seven others considered to be among the best in the business. With scores based on a 100-point scale, men can earn up to 50 points per fight based on their ability to exhibit control and style while maneuvering around or over an animal; a bull can earn up to 50 points based on its quickness, aggression and willingness to stay with the bullfighter.

“It’s going to be a great event, and I’m really looking forward to showing everyone in Florida what sets Bullfighters Only apart from other bullfights.” Inman said.

postheadericon Moore sprints into San Angelo lead

Amberleigh Moore riders her mare, Paige, to a 13.99-second run Sunday afternoon to take the second-round and average lead at the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo. (RIC ANDERSEN PHOTO)

Amberleigh Moore riders her mare, Paige, to a 13.99-second run Sunday afternoon to take the second-round and average lead at the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo. (RIC ANDERSEN PHOTO)

SAN ANGELO, Texas – Amberleigh Moore has a lot of faith in her young partner, a 7-year-old mare she calls Paige.

“She’s taking me for the ride right now,” said Moore of Keizer, Ore. “Ever since I fell off, she’s hit a new gear. The rodeos I went to this week – Jackson (Miss.), Belton (Texas) and here – she’s taken off like she did in Vegas, and I’m literally just hanging on for the ride.”

She held on pretty well, circling the cloverleaf pattern Sunday afternoon at the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo in a rodeo-best 13.99 seconds. She owns the second-round lead and also sits No. 1 in the average with a two-run cumulative time of 29.90 seconds. It’s all been a whirlwind since she took a nasty spill last weekend in Fort Worth, Texas.

Amberleigh Moore

Amberleigh Moore

As she came around the third barrel on the afternoon of Feb. 4, the latigo broke on her saddle. Shortly after Paige crossed the scoring line, Moore hit the dirt hard. She is still sore, but she’s been riding with a huge smile on her face. She won the rodeo in Belton this weekend and leads Jackson.

All this coming shortly after her inaugural run at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, where she earned more than $187,000 in 10 days and catapulted to the No. 2 spot in the final world standings.

“The momentum from last year is carrying over,” Moore said. “After Vegas, she got a month off. She hasn’t slowed down since the first run I put on her. That mare has not backed off one bit.

“This is our third year on the trail, so this is the third time she’s been in these pens. She knows what she’s doing and where she’s at. From 2016 to 2017, she’s just a year older and a year stronger. She’ll be 8 years old in May, and I’ve just let her do this on her own.”

It’s working, and now she’s made her plans to return to San Angelo on Friday for the championship round.

“She took off from the alleyway, and she was smooth and fast,” she said of Sunday’s run. “Last year, I ran a 13.99 and (knocked down) the third barrel to win the second round and take the lead in the average. This year I made up for it. This year I was determined to run clean around the third barrel.

“Last year I didn’t do any good at the winter rodeos. I tipped a lot of barrels. This year is setting up so it’s not so hard later in the year. If you can do well at these winter rodeos, it can set you up so that your summer run is easier.”

In 2016, Moore scrambled to finish the regular season 15th in the world standings, taking the last qualifying spot for the NFR. She’d like to have an easier time making it back to Las Vegas in December, and she knows the road she needs to take. More importantly, she knows that Paige is the right speedster to get her back. She is 14th in the world standings with nearly $11,000 in earnings.

“She’s one in a million,” Moore said her mare. “She gets bored being at home. She likes being out on the road with me.”

It shows in every run the tandem makes.

San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo
Feb. 3-5, Feb. 10-12, Feb. 15-17
Bareback riding leaders:
1. Austin Foss, 89 points on Powder River Rodeo’s Craig at Midnight; 2. Orin Larsen, 87.5; 3. (tie) Devan Reilly, Tyler Nelson and Ty Breuer, 86 points each; 6. Kelly Timberman, 85; 7. Seth Hardwick, 83; 8. Clint Laye, 81; 9. (tie) Jamie Howlett and Casey Breuer, 80 each; 11. (tie) Justin McDaniel, Joel Schlegel, Luke Creasy and Jordan Pelton, 79 each.

Steer wrestling: First round leaders: 1. (tie) Tyler Waguespack and Dakota Eldridge, 3.3 seconds each; 3. (tie) Ty Erickson, Blake Knowles, Luke Branquinho and Justen Notes, 3.5 each; 7. Stephen Culling, 3.6; 8. (tie) Baylor Roche and Justin Shaffer, 3.7 each. Second round leaders: 1. David Hinman, 3.3 seconds; 2. (tie) Baylor Roche, Dirk Tavenner and Josh Peek, 3.5 each; 5. (tie) Timmy Sparring, Clayton Hass, Nick Guy Todd Suhn and Rowdy Thomas, 3.6 each. Average leaders: 1. Tyler Waguespack, 7.0 seconds on two runs; 2. Baylor Roche, 7.2; 3. Todd Suhn, 7.4; 4. (tie) Josh Peek and Blake Knowles, 7.7 each; 6. (tie) Kyle Whitaker and Cooper Shofner, 7.9 each; 8. (tie) Nick Guy, Dakota Eldridge, David Hinman and Dakota Champion, 8.0 each; 12. (tie) Dirk Tavenner and Ty Erickson, 8.1 each.

Team roping: First round leaders: 1. Erich Rogers/Cory Petska, 3.8 seconds; 2. JoJo LeMond/Quinn Kesler, 4.1; 3. Bart Brunson/Trace Porter, 4.2; 4. Chad Masters/Travis Graves, 4.3; 5. (tie) Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz and Charly Crawford/Joseph Harrison, 4.5 each; 7. (tie) Shawn Besette/Sid Sporer, Tate Kirchenschlager/Trevor Kirchenschlager and Cole Markham/Nick Simmons, 4.6. Second round leaders: 1. Derrick Begay/Clay O’Brien Cooper, 3.9 seconds; 2. Nick Sartain/Justin Davis, 4.0; 3. (tie) Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger and Matt Sherwood/Joel Bach, 4.1 each; 5. Brett Stuart/Wesley Moss, 4.2; 6. John Alley/Clark Adcock, 4.3; 7. Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, 4.4; 8. (tie) Zac Small/Will Woodfin, Travis Tryan/Chase Tryan and Luke Brown/Jake Long, 4.5. Average leaders: 1. Tate Kirchenschlager/Trevor Kirchenschlager, 9.8 seconds on two runs; 2. Luke Brown/Jake Long, 9.9 seconds; 3. Chase Massengill/Kory Bramwell, 10.1; 4. Clayton Van Aken/Shawn Darnall, 10.3; 5. Seth Hall/Byron Wilkerson, 10.6; 6. Dustin Bird/Russell Cardoza, 10.9; 7. Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz, 13.3; 8. Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger, 13.4; 9. Travis Tryan/Chase Tryan, 13.9; 10. Charly Crawford/Joseph Harrison, 14.5; 11. Ty Blasingame/Kollin VonAhn, 15.2; 12. Brandon Webb/Mickey Gomez, 15.5.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. Ryder Wright, 81 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Pendleton Whisky Django; 2. (tie) Magin Lane Montoya, Dalton Davis, Isaac Diaz and Layton Green, 80 each; 6. CoBurn Bradshaw, 79.5; 7. (tie) Zeke Thurston and Jesse Kruse, 78.5 each; 9. (tie) Jacobs Crawley and Chuck Schmidt, 78 each; 11. Wyatt Casper and Jake Wright, 77 each.

Tie-down roping: First round leaders: 1. (tie) Michael Otero and Tuf Cooper, 7.0 seconds each; 3. Darnell Johnson, 7.5; 4. (tie) Marty Yates, Hunter Herrin, Cade Swor, Catfish Brown and Tyler Milligan, 7.6 each. Second round leaders: 1. Cody Quaney, 7.0 seconds; 2. Justin Smith, 7.1; 3. (tie) Scott Kormos and Tim Pharr, 7.3 each; 5. (tie) J.C. Malone and Lane Livingston, 7.4 each; 7. (tie) Blane Cox, Seth Cooke and Trinton Downing, 7.5 each. Average leaders: 1. Cody Quaney, 14.8 seconds on two runs; 2. Tuf Cooper, 15.0; 3. Clint Singleton, 15.8; 4. Cooper Martin, 16.1; 5. (tie) Cade Swor, Clint Robinson and Cimarron Boardman, 16.2 each; 8. Catfish Brown, 16.3; 9. (tie) Marcos Costa and Marty Yates, 16.4; 11. Adam Gray, 16.6; 12. Josh Peek, 17.0.

Barrel racing: Second round leaders: 1. Amberleigh Moore, 13.99 seconds; 2. Brooke Rix, 14.03; 3. Sammi Bessert, 14.15; 4. Cassie Mowry, 14.20; 5. Laura Kennedy, 14.24; 6. Lindsay Sears, 14.24; 7. Kellie Collier, 14.32; 8. Jennifer Arnold, 14.35; 9 Trula Churchill, 14.36; 10. Hailey Kinsel, 14.37. Average leaders: 1. Amberleigh Moore, 29.90; 2. Kassie Mowry, 30.15; 3. Sammi Bessert, 30.16; 4. Brooke Rix, 30.18; 5. Carmel Wright, 30.23; 6. Kellie Collier, 30.37; 7. Morgan Breaux, 30.44; 8. Trula Churchill, 30.47; 9. Hailey Kinsel, 30.48; 10. Shelby McCauley, 30.53; 11. Brittany Kelly, 30.60; 12. Kelsy Lutjen, 30.68.

Bull riding leaders: 1. Trey Benton III, 88.5 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Red Rocket; 2. Brennon Eldred, 87.5; 3. (tie) Jordan Hansen and Mickey Andrews, 85 each; 5. (tie) Kyle Balls and Jordan Wacey Spears, 84 each; 7. Brock Radford, 83.5; 8. (tie) Tanner Learmont and John Pitts, 83 each.

postheadericon Foss spurs his way to the top spot

Austin Foss matches moves with Powder River Rodeo's Craig at Midnight for 89 points Saturday night to take the bareback riding lead at the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo. (RIC ANDERSEN PHOTO)

Austin Foss matches moves with Powder River Rodeo’s Craig at Midnight for 89 points Saturday night to take the bareback riding lead at the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo. (RIC ANDERSEN PHOTO)

SAN ANGELO, Texas – Craig at Midnight is big and powerful. He stands at least 16 hands tall and weighs in excess of 1,800 pounds, and he’s the reigning Bareback Horse of the Year.

On Saturday night at the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo, the athletic gray horse guided Austin Foss to an 89-point ride and the bareback riding lead through seven performances. It was the perfect horse at the perfect place for Foss, a three-time Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifier from Terrebonne, Ore.

“When I saw his name next to mine (earlier this week when the draw was released), I just about dropped my phone,” he said. “It was a good feeling.”

Austin Foss

Austin Foss

Foss has had great success inside San Angelo Coliseum before. Two years ago, he won both rounds to claim the bareback riding title. He earned more than $11,000 then, and that was one of the many events that earned him his third straight trip to Las Vegas and ProRodeo’s grand finale.

“I got a really good feeling when that horse was coming in to the chutes,” Foss said. “He’s a lot more level-headed than the last time I got on him, and I’m not hurting like I was back then.”

Their last meeting occurred at the 2013 NFR, and Craig at Midnight bucked off an ailing Foss, who was struggling with a herniated disc in his neck. The cowboy was forced to miss the final two rounds because of his injury.

That wasn’t the case Saturday.

“He bucked me off after the whistle, but we made it through,” Foss said. “He was really good tonight.”

What makes the powerful gray so good? Foss said the horse is considered an eliminator because he’s so difficult to ride. Sometimes those horses have some nasty moves with their bucking motion. Sometimes they just overpower their rider.

“He just bucks,” he said. “He just turns out of there and is so big, and he goes at it. He was pretty decent to ride tonight. He had just a few bumps to him, but I was able to manage them OK.”

After sitting out the 2016 season, Foss is excited to be back on the ProRodeo trail. He is 45th in the world standings, but a strong performance in San Angelo can go a long ways in pushing him up the money list.

“Having his name net to mine is a rung on the ladder for me,” Foss said. “It was a good feeling, and it gives you incentive to do your best and try your hardest. The long-term opportunity out there is something that can really catapult a guy right up there in the top 15 in the standings.

“My confidence is really good, especially after that ride. Being able to ride a horse like that definitely shoots a guy’s confidence through the roof.”

It worked two years ago, so he has no reason to doubt that it can happen again.

San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo
Feb. 3-5, Feb. 10-12, Feb. 15-17
Bareback riding leaders:
1. Austin Foss, 89 points on Powder River Rodeo’s Craig at Midnight; 2. (tie) Devan Reilly, Tyler Nelson and Ty Breuer, 86 points each; 5. Kelly Timberman, 85; 6. Clint Laye, 81; 7. (tie) Jamie Howlett and Casey Breuer, 80 each.

Steer wrestling: First round leaders: 1. (tie) Tyler Waguespack and Dakota Eldridge, 3.3 seconds each; 3. (tie) Ty Erickson, Blake Knowles, Luke Branquinho and Justen Notes, 3.5 each; 7. Stephen Culling, 3.6; 8. (tie) Baylor Roche and Justin Shaffer, 3.7 each. Second round leaders: 1. David Hinman, 3.3 seconds; 2. (tie) Baylor Roche, Dirk Tavenner and Josh Peek, 3.5 each; 5. (tie) Timmy Sparring, Clayton Hass, Nick Guy Todd Suhn and Rowdy Thomas, 3.6 each. Average leaders: 1. Tyler Waguespack, 7.0 seconds on two runs; 2. Baylor Roche, 7.2; 3. Todd Suhn, 7.4; 4. (tie) Josh Peek and Blake Knowles, 7.7 each; 6. (tie) Kyle Whitaker and Cooper Shofner, 7.9 each; 8. (tie) Nick Guy, Dakota Eldridge, David Hinman and Dakota Champion, 8.0 each; 12. (tie) Dirk Tavenner and Ty Erickson, 8.1 each.

Team roping: First round leaders: 1. Erich Rogers/Cory Petska, 3.8 seconds; 2. JoJo LeMond/Quinn Kesler, 4.1; 3. Bart Brunson/Trace Porter, 4.2; 4. Chad Masters/Travis Graves, 4.3; 5. (tie) Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz and Charly Crawford/Joseph Harrison, 4.5 each; 7. (tie) Shawn Besette/Sid Sporer, Tate Kirchenschlager/Trevor Kirchenschlager and Cole Markham/Nick Simmons, 4.6. Second round leaders: 1. Derrick Begay/Clay O’Brien Cooper, 3.9 seconds; 2. (tie) Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger and Matt Sherwood/Joel Bach, 4.1 each; 4. Brett Stuart/Wesley Moss, 4.2; 5. John Alley/Clark Adcock, 4.3; 6. Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, 4.4; 7. (tie) Zac Small/Will Woodfin, Travis Tryan/Chase Tryan and Luke Brown/Jake Long, 4.5. Average leaders: 1. Tate Kirchenschlager/Trevor Kirchenschlager, 9.8 seconds on two runs; 2. Luke Brown/Jake Long, 9.9 seconds; 3. Chase Massengill/Kory Bramwell, 10.1; 4. Clayton Van Aken/Shawn Darnall, 10.3; 5. Seth Hall/Byron Wilkerson, 10.6; 6. Dustin Bird/Russell Cardoza, 10.9; 7. Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz, 13.3; 8. Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger, 13.4.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. Ryder Wright, 81 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Pendleton Whisky Django; 2. (tie) Magin Lane Montoya, Dalton Davis, Isaac Diaz and Layton Green, 80 each; 6. Zeke Thurston, 78.5; 7. (tie) Jacobs Crawley and Chuck Schmidt, 78.

Tie-down roping: First round leaders: 1. (tie) Michael Otero and Tuf Cooper, 7.0 seconds each; 3. Darnell Johnson, 7.5; 4. (tie) Marty Yates, Hunter Herrin, Cade Swor, Catfish Brown and Tyler Milligan, 7.6 each. Second round leaders: 1. Cody Quaney, 7.0 seconds; 2. Justin Smith, 7.1; 3. (tie) Scott Kormos and Tim Pharr, 7.3 each; 5. (tie) J.C. Malone and Lane Livingston, 7.4 each; 7. (tie) Blane Cox, Seth Cooke and Trinton Downing, 7.5 each. Average leaders: 1. Cody Quaney, 14.8 seconds on two runs; 2. Tuf Cooper, 15.0; 3. Clint Singleton, 15.8; 4. Cooper Martin, 16.1; 5. (tie) Cade Swor, Clint Robinson and Cimarron Boardman, 16.2 each; 8. Catfish Brown, 16.3.

Barrel racing: Second round leaders: 1. Cassie Mowry, 14.20 seconds; 2. Laura Kennedy, 14.24; 3. Lindsay Sears, 14.24; 4. Jennifer Arnold, 14.35; 5. Kelsey Lutjen, 14.38; 6. (tie) Cassidy Kruse and Carmel Wright, 14.39 each; 8. Shelby McCauley, 14.40; 9. Brooke Jeter, 14.42; 10. Morgan Breaux, 14.43. Average leaders: 1. Kassie Mowry, 30.15 seconds on two runs; 2. Carmel Wright, 30.23; 3. Morgan Breaux, 30.44; 4. Shelby McCauley, 30.53; 5. Kelsy Lutjen, 30.68; 6. (tie) Ericka Nelson and Samantha Boone, 30.69 each; 8. (tie) Jennifer Arnold and Rainy Robinson, 30.74 each; 10. Cassidy Kruse, 30.78; 11. Laura Kennedy, 30.80; 12. Meghan Johnspon, 30.81.

Bull riding leaders: 1. Trey Benton III, 88.5 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Red Rocket; 2. Brennon Eldred, 87.5; 3. (tie) Jordan Hansen and Mickey Andrews, 85 each; 5. (tie) Kyle Balls and Jordan Wacey Spears, 84 each; 7. Brock Radford, 83.5; 8. (tie) Tanner Learmont and John Pitts, 83 each.

postheadericon Breuer, Nelson ride for the lead

Ty Breuer rides C5 Rodeo's White Water for 86 points to share the bareback riding lead at the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo. (RIC ANDERSEN PHOTO)

Ty Breuer rides C5 Rodeo’s White Water for 86 points to share the bareback riding lead at the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo. (RIC ANDERSEN PHOTO)

SAN ANGELO, Texas – Ty Breuer hasn’t ventured too far from his home near Mandan, N.D., very often in February.

“I usually don’t rodeo in the winter as much because we start calving back home,” said Breuer, a two-time Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifier. “We started calving a little bit later this year so I could go to some of these.”

He’s taking advantage of it. On Friday night, he moved into a three-way tie for first place in bareback riding at the San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo with 86 points by matching moves with C5 Rodeo’s White Water; that score was equaled Friday by Tyler Nelson of Victor, Idaho, who spurred C5’s Night Life, and by Devan Reilly of Sheridan, Wyo., last Sunday on Touch of Class from the Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo firm.

Ty Breuer

Ty Breuer

The trio sits atop a strong leaderboard in anticipation to the championship round, which takes place Friday, Feb. 17, and will feature the top 12 contestants in each event from the preliminary rounds. Breuer has been in the San Angelo short round before; Nelson hasn’t.

“I haven’t really done that well here before,” said Nelson, who is 15th in the world standings “It’s always good to get a good start to the season. It gives you momentum through the year. I’ve drawn pretty well so far this year

He did. In fact, the lion’s share of his 2017 earnings came recently in Fort Worth, Texas, where he placed in three of four go-rounds, finished fourth in the average and pocketed more than $5,200. He stands a good chance to catch some west Texas cash, thanks in part to his dancing partner Friday night inside San Angelo Coliseum.

“I really had no idea what the horse was, but she was really good and a lot of fun,” Nelson said of Night Life. “She gave me a lot of time to expose myself. She’s a good example of a horse that doesn’t travel very far but gets up in the air. She lets you show off a little bit.”

Tyler Nelson

Tyler Nelson

While Nelson knew little about his mount, Breuer has had success on White Water.

“I’ve seen it a couple of times, and last year I got on him in Ponoka (Alberta) and was 86 points on him there,” Breuer said. “It’s always good to do well, especially in San Angelo.

“I started out the season pretty good, but I haven’t been going to many rodeos. I had some luck in Rapid City (S.D.) and a little luck in Denver.”

In fact, the North Dakota cowboy won the Rapid City title and earned $5,584 in the process. He sits seventh on the money list with $15,786, and he’ll need every dime. He’ll have to take time away from the rodeo trail as he handles the family’s cattle business back home.

Of course, he’s riding a wave of momentum that carried him to the NFR for the second time this past December. He’d like to return again and, hopefully, make it a regular destination.

“The NFR really helps and really drives a guy to get better,” Breuer said. “I didn’t really do what I wanted to there, so you just have to keep working at it.”

Breuer added more than $43,000 in Las Vegas money by placing in four go-rounds. That’s a solid wage for 10 days of work, but it still left a bad taste in the cowboy’s mouth.

Nelson, though, would just like to get the feeling of what it means to compete at ProRodeo’s grand finale. He has finished among the top 30 in the world standings each of the past two seasons and has hopes that 2017 is his breakthrough season.

“I’m definitely going to reach for it this year,” he said. “I just need to stay healthy and draw good, and that can help you get to the top 15 to get to Vegas.

“My confidence is as good as it’s ever been. I’m also enjoying it, which helps a bunch, too.”

It certainly showed Friday night.

San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo
Feb. 3-5, Feb. 10-12, Feb. 15-17
Bareback riding leaders:
1. (tie) Devan Reilly, on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Touch of Class, Tyler Nelson, on C5 Rodeo’s Night Life, and Ty Breuer, on C5 Rodeo’s White Water, 86 points each; 4. Kelly Timberman, 85; 5. (tie) Jamie Howlett and Casey Breuer, 80 each; 7. (tie) Justin McDaniel, Joel Schlegel, Luke Creasy and Jordan Petlon, 79 each.

Steer wrestling: First round leaders: 1. (tie) Tyler Waguespack and Dakota Eldridge, 3.3 seconds each; 3. (tie) Ty Erickson, Blake Knowles, Luke Branquinho and Justen Notes, 3.5 each; 7. Stephen Culling, 3.6; 8. Baylor Roche, 3.7. Second round leaders: 1. David Hinman, 3.3 seconds; 2. (tie) Baylor Roche, Dirk Tavenner and Josh Peek, 3.5 each; 5. (tie) Timmy Sparring, Clayton Hass, Nick Guy Todd Suhn and Rowdy Thomas, 3.6 each. Average leaders: 1. Tyler Waguespack, 7.0 seconds on two runs; 2. Baylor Roche, 7.2; 3. Todd Suhn, 7.4; 4. (tie) Josh Peek and Blake Knowles, 7.7 each; 6. (tie) Kyle Whitaker and Cooper Shofner, 7.9 each; 8. (tie) Nick Guy, Dakota Eldridge, David Hinman and Dakota Champion, 8.0 each; 12. (tie) Dirk Tavenner and Ty Erickson, 8.1 each.

Team roping: First round leaders: 1. Erich Rogers/Cory Petska, 3.8 seconds; 2. Bart Brunson/Trace Porter, 4.2; 3. Chad Masters/Travis Graves, 4.3; 4. (tie) Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz and Charly Crawford/Joseph Harrison, 4.5 each; 6. (tie) Shawn Besette/Sid Sporer, Tate Kirchenschlager/Trevor Kirchenschlager and Cole Markham/Nick Simmons, 4.6. Second round leaders: 1. Derrick Begay/Clay O’Brien Cooper, 3.9 seconds; 2. (tie) Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger and Matt Sherwood/Joel Bach, 4.1 each; 3. 4. Brett Stuart/Wesley Moss, 4.2; 5. Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, 4.4; 6. (tie) Zac Small/Will Woodfin and Travis Tryan/Chase Tryan, 4.5; 8. Jr. Dees/Matt Zancanella, 4.6. Average leaders: 1. Tate Kirchenschlager/Trevor Kirchenschlager, 9.8 seconds on two runs; 2. Chase Massengill/Kory Bramwell, 10.1; 3. Clayton Van Aken/Shawn Darnall, 10.3; 4. Seth Hall/Byron Wilkerson, 10.6; 5. Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz, 13.3; 6. Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger, 13.4; 7. Travis Tryan/Chase Tryan, 13.9; 8. Charly Crawford/Joseph Harrison, 14.5.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. Ryder Wright, 81 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Pendleton Whisky Django; 2. (tie) Magin Lane Montoya and Dalton Davis, 80 each; 4. (tie) Jacobs Crawley and Chuck Schmidt, 78; 6. (tie) Colt Gordon and Charlie Kogianes, 76 each; 8. Rusty Wright, 75.5.

Tie-down roping: First round leaders: 1. (tie) Michael Otero and Tuf Cooper, 7.0 seconds each; 3. Darnell Johnson, 7.5; 4. (tie) Marty Yates, Catfish Brown and Tyler Milligan, 7.6 each; 7. Clint Singleton, 7.7; 8. Cody Quaney, 7.8. Second round leaders: 1. Cody Quaney, 7.0 seconds; 2. Justin Smith, 7.1; 3. (tie) Scott Kormos and Tim Pharr, 7.3 each; 5. (tie) J.C. Malone and Lane Livingston, 7.4 each; 7. (tie) Blane Cox, Seth Cooke and Trinton Downing, 7.5 each. Average leaders: 1. Cody Quaney, 14.8 seconds on two runs; 2. Tuf Cooper, 15.0; 3. Clint Singleton, 15.8; 4. Cooper Martin, 16.1; 5. (tie) Clint Robinson and Cimarron Boardman, 16.2 each; 7. Catfish Brown, 16.3; 8. (tie) Josh Peek and E.J. Robertrs, 17.0 each; 10. (tie) Shank Edwards Kody Mahaffey, 17.1 each; 12. Will Howell, 17.6.

Barrel racing: Second round leaders: 1. Cassie Mowry, 14.20 seconds; 2. Laura Kennedy, 14.24; 3. Lindsay Sears, 14.24; 4. Jennifer Arnold, 14.35; 5. (tie) Cassidy Kruse and Carmel Wright, 14.39 each; 7. Shelby McCauley, 14.40; 8. Brooke Jeter, 14.42; 9. Morgan Breaux, 14.43; 10. Rainy Robinson, 14.44. Average leaders: 1. Kassie Mowry, 30.15 seconds on two runs; 2. Carmel Wright, 30.23; 3. Morgan Breaux, 30.44; 4. Shelby McCauley, 30.53; 5. (tie) Jennifer Arnold and Rainy Robinson, 30.74 each; 7. Cassidy Kruse, 30.78; 8. Laura Kennedy, 30.80; 9. Lindsay Sears, 30.83; 10. Amy Jo Farella, 30.84; 11. Fallon Jordan, 30.95; 12. Deb Guelly, 30.99.

Bull riding leaders: 1. Trey Benton III, 88.5 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Red Rocket; 2. Brennon Eldred, 87.5; 3. Jordan Hansen, 85; 4. (tie) Kyle Balls and Jordan Wacey Spears, 84 each; 6. Brock Radford, 83.5; 7. (tie) Tanner Learmont and John Pitts, 83 each.

postheadericon A test for true cowboys

The excitement of the CINCH Timed Event Championship brings out the best

GUTHRIE, Okla. – For many, John Wayne was the epitome of a cowboy: Rugged, tough, strong and charismatic.

It was an attitude he portrayed on screen, but it was the perfect symbol of what it takes to be a real cowboy. Twenty men will bring that persona to central Oklahoma for the 33rd edition of the CINCH Timed Event Championship of the World, set for Friday, March 3-Sunday, March 5, at the Lazy E Arena. It is a coarse test of stamina, courage and talent for some of the greatest all-around cowboys who play the game today.

Trevor Brazile

Trevor Brazile

“There’s not another event like it,” said Trevor Brazile, a seven-time Timed Event champion from Decatur, Texas. “It is the purest of timed-event contests, then you put it in a venue like the Lazy E, and it adds that much more of a cowboy contest.”

It’s a five-round championship spread over just three days. There’s no rest for the weary, and each man must compete in all five timed-event disciplines – heading, heeling, tie-down roping, steer wrestling and steer roping – in every go-round. It’s a wild ride to the championship, where $100,000 will be paid to the winner with the best cumulative time on 25 runs.

“It’s been the cowboy’s event since it started,” said Paul David Tierney, a two-time and the reigning champion from Oral, S.D.

Paul David Tierney

Paul David Tierney

He should know. His father, Paul, is a four-time CINCH TEC titlist, and the youngest member of the family will also compete alongside his brother, Jess. They are the next generation of cowboys who can compete in this exclusive championship, known as the “Ironman of ProRodeo.” What makes the Timed Event more special this year is the inclusion of the Jr. Ironman Championship, which will feature 10 top cowboys who range in age from 15-20.

“I think there are a few more people getting into it nowadays, so they can be able to do the Timed Event when they get old enough,” Tierney said, noting that the younger competitors will test their skills in heading, heeling, tie-down roping and steer wrestling. “I think that’s good for this event.”

It is. The Jr. Ironman will begin at 9 a.m. Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. Sunday. It’s an outstanding opening act for the greatest all-around timed-event cowboys in the world competing in the most challenging contest in the sport.

Daniel Green

Daniel Green

“The competition is unmatched as far as the ability people have,” said Daniel Green, a three-time champ from Oakdale, Calif. “The single toughest thing you face is the course. It is the hardest thing to get by, the switching of the horses, the switching of events, the size of the cattle, the length of the score. All that put together is the toughest competition you will face.”

That’s part of the attraction. It’s why men cross the country and invest into the challenge, and it’s why fans show up by the thousands for each performance.

“Part of what makes the Timed Event so great is the fans,” said K.C. Jones, a five-time titlist from Burlington, Wyo. “They appreciate it, and that’s why they’re there.

K.C. Jones

K.C. Jones

“To be successful there, it’s all about being prepared when you get there. If you’ve got a hole in your program, you’re in trouble. You need to be solid and prepared in all five events.”

That’s going to be a valuable tool to all 20 men in the field. While the past champs have an edge, any cowboy can make a move toward the top at any given moment.

“If you stub your toe, somebody’s going to be right there,” said Brazile, who also owns a PRCA record 23 world titles spread out over four disciplines: the all-around, tie-down roping, steer roping and heading. “You have to have your foot on the gas the whole time.

“You have to be efficient in all five events. You can’t dabble. You better be on you’re A game for all of it.”

That’s why he’s won more Timed Event titles than anyone else.

postheadericon Community is key for Starkville rodeo

STARKVILLE, Miss. – Rotary Rodeo organizers have many objectives when it comes to their event.

They want to entertain fans, produce a world-class competition and raise money for local causes in the area. With the help of Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo, they will get that chance during the event, set for 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 10, and Saturday, Feb. 11, at MS Horse Park in Starkville.

“You’re not going to go anywhere else around here and see this caliber of contestants and this caliber of stock” said Bricklee Miller, an organizer with the Rotary Rodeo. “It’s going to make for an exciting rodeo.

Bricklee Miller

Bricklee Miller

“This is the Rotary Club’s largest fundraiser, and the proceeds we get from this stay right here in this community.”

That is the most important part of the event. Adults can purchase tickets for $12 in advance or $15 at the door. Children 12 and younger can get in for free Friday and for just $5 Saturday.

“This is a family-friendly event,” Miller said. “In addition, on Saturday night from 5 to 6:30 (p.m.) on the arena floor, we will have pony rides and a petting zoo. It gives children opportunities a lot of them don’t get to do.”

Being community-minded is a big part of the success for the Rotary Rodeo.

“Besides the fact that these athletes are getting a chance to work at their sport, any revenues from this go back to help the community,” said Briar Jones, president of the Starkville Rotary Club. “We are able to contribute to 22 local causes and also youth activities, including a dictionary project that we do in Starkville to make sure all third-graders in the county receive dictionaries.”

Supporting local causes is a longstanding tradition for the civic organization, but the rodeo goes beyond that. It will feature hundreds of the top players in the game, and many will be matched with the animal athletes from the Dallas-based Carr firm, which has five nominations for Stock Contractor of the Year in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association.

Over the last four years, no other livestock firm has had more animals selected to perform at the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, the sport’s premier championship.

“I know I’m going to have a top performance and that we’re going to have top stock that’s been at the National Finals Rodeo,” Miller said. “That’s going to give the contestants the best opportunity to have high-marked rides in the riding events and fast times in the timed events. That helps make it a fun event for the fans.”

Fun is the name of the game, and that includes clown Gizmo McCracken, who has multiple nominations for PRCA Comedy Act of the Year.

It’s the perfect fit for the Rotary Rodeo.

postheadericon Champ jumps to San Angelo lead

Reigning world champion Tyler Waguespack competes Sunday during his second-round steer wrestling run Sunday during the fourth performance of the San Angelo Stock Show & Rodeo. (RIC ANDERSEN PHOTO)

Reigning world champion Tyler Waguespack competes Sunday during his second-round steer wrestling run Sunday during the fourth performance of the San Angelo Stock Show & Rodeo. (RIC ANDERSEN PHOTO)

SAN ANGELO, Texas – If momentum is a key to success, Tyler Waguespack is on quite a roll.

“Momentum is very important,” said Waguespack, the 2016 world champion steer wrestler who leads the San Angelo Stock Show & Rodeo with a two-run cumulative time of 7.0 seconds. “It seems like two years ago over the Fourth of July, I had a really good run, and I’ve been having solid weeks ever since.

“It’s more about your confidence. Each time you back into the box, you know you’re capable of making the runs to compete at this level.”

Tyler Waguespack

Tyler Waguespack

He proved it very well during the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo this past December, where he placed in eight go-rounds – including a share of three round victories – and won the average title. He earned $213,218 in 10 nights, more than any other contestant in the field, and pushed his season total to just shy of $300,000.

That’s not too bad for a man who was competing on ProRodeo’s biggest stage for just the second time in his career.

“It’s pretty hectic at the NFR and really nerve-racking,” he said. “To come in the second year and win the world title is incredible. You get into a comfort zone by knowing what to expect more than anything.”

Now he’s parlayed that momentum into a solid start to the 2017 season. He has earned a little more than $28,000 and is second in the world standings, just about $1,200 behind traveling partner Ty Erickson; another member of their posse is Clayton Hass, who sits fourth in the standings so far. All ride Cadillac, a two-time AQHA Steer Wrestling Horse of the Year.

“We’ve been having a lot of luck for a while now, and I don’t really want to take my foot off the gas right now,” Waguespack said. “Ever since I was little, I’ve worked hard to get where I’m at. To ride a great horse like Cadillac just puts more fuel on the fire.”

In addition to leading the rodeo, the Gonzalez, La., cowboy is one of two men who have posted the fastest time of the rodeo, a first-round tying 3.3-second run with a fourth traveling partner, Dakota Eldridge. Waguespack added a 3.7 on Sunday, and that has him seventh in the second round. Most importantly, he should easily return for the short go-round, scheduled for Friday, Feb. 17.

“In the first round, I was the second guy to go, and I wasn’t sure what to expect on the steer,” he said. “We were shooting blind but wound up good. For the second round, we were able to watch those steers go three times prior to today, and we made it work out.

“This is the fifth time I’ve been here, and this is the fourth time for me. I really like this rodeo, and I’ve had a lot of luck before. It’s definitely a hot spot for me.”

Waguespack is on a hot streak, so he may as well enjoy his hot spot when he can.

San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo
Feb. 3-5, Feb. 10-12, Feb. 15-17
Bareback riding leaders:
1. Devan Reilly, 86 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Touch of Class; 2. Kelly Timberman, 85; 3. Jamie Howlett, 80; 4. (tie) Justin McDaniel, Joel Schlegel and Luke Creasy, 79 each; 7. (tie) Shon Gibson and Jessy Davis, 76.

Steer wrestling: First round leaders: 1. (tie) Tyler Waguespack and Dakota Eldridge, 3.3 seconds each; 3. (tie) Ty Erickson and Blake Knowles, 3.5 each; 5. Baylor Roche, 3.7; 6. (tie) Kyle Whitaker, Jacob Talley and Jacob Shofner, 3.8 each. Second round leaders: 1. (tie) Baylor Roche, Dirk Tavenner and Josh Peek, 3.5 each; 4. (tie) Timmy Sparring, Clayton Hass and Nick Guy, 3.6 each; 7. Tyler Waguespack, 3.7; 8. Trey Green, 3.8. Average leaders: 1. Tyler Waguespack, 7.0 seconds on two runs; 2. Baylor Roche, 7.2; 3. (tie) Josh Peek and Blake Knowles, 7.7 each; 5. Kyle Whitaker, 7.9; 6. (tie) Nick Guy and Dakota Eldridge, 8.0 each; 8. (tie) Dirk Tavenner and Ty Erickson, 8.1 each.

Team roping: First round leaders: 1. Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz, 4.6 seconds; 2. (tie) Cory Clark/Clint Summers and Jake Cooper/Brady Norman, 5.5 each; 4. Aaron Macy/Evan Arnold, 6.1; 5. Billy Bob Brown/Logan Medlin, 9.2; 6. Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger, 9.3; 7. Cory Kidd/Tyler Worley, 14.6; no other qualified runs. Second round leaders: 1. (tie) Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger and Matt Sherwood/Joel Bach, 4.1 seconds each; 3. Zac Small/Will Woodfin, 4.5; 4. Jr. Dees/Matt Zancanella, 4.6; 5. Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz, 8.8; 6. Kolton Schmidt/Shay Carroll, 9.1; 7; Tyler Wade/Dakota Kirchenschlager, 13.7; no other qualified runs. Average leaders: 1. Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz, 13.3 seconds on two runs; 2. Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger, 13.4; 3. Matt Sherwood/Joel Bach, 4.1 seconds on one run; 4. Zac Small/Will Woodfin, 4.5; 5. Jr. Dees/Matt Zancanella, 4.6; 6. (tie) Cory Clark/Clint Summers and Jake Cooper/Brady Norman, 5.5 each; 8. Aaron Macy/Evan Arnold, 6.1.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. Ryder Wright, 81 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Pendleton Whisky Django; 2. (tie) Magin Lane Montoya and Dalton Davis, 80 each; 4. Jacobs Crawley, 78; 5. (tie) Colt Gordon and Charlie Kogianes, 76 each; 7. Rusty Wright, 75.5; 8. (tie) Clint Hopping and Dustin Flundra, 75 each.

Tie-down roping: First round leaders: 1. Michael Otero, 7.0 seconds; 2. Cody Quaney, 7.8; 3. Ryle Smith, 7.9; 4. Shank Edwards, 8.2; 5. Cory Solomon, 8.6; 6. Josh Peek, 8.7; 7. Timber Moore, 8.9; 8. Sterling Smith, 9.5; 4. (tie) Randall Carlisle and Matt Shiozawa, 10.9 each; 6. Blane Cox, 11.1; 7. Caleb Smidt, 14.2; no other qualified runs. Second round leaders: 1. Cody Quaney, 7.0 seconds; 2. (tie) Scott Kormos and Tim Pharr, 7.3 each; 4. J.C. Malone, 7.4; 5. Blane Cox, 7.5; 6. Chant DeForest, 7.6; 7. Chase Williams, 7.7; 8. Ace Slone, 8.0. Average leaders: 1. Cody Quaney, 14.8 seconds on two runs; 2. Josh Peek, 17.0; 3. Shank Edwards, 17.1; 4. Blane Cox, 18.6; 5. Riley Pruitt, 18.9; 6. Timber Moore, 22.7; 7 Randall Carlisle, 23.0; 8. Chant DeForest, 23.7.

Barrel racing: Second round leaders: 1. Laura Kennedy, 14.24 seconds; 2. Lindsay Sears, 14.24; 3. Jennifer Arnold, 14.35; 4. (tie) Cassidy Kruse and Carmel Wright, 14.39; 6. Shelby McCauley, 14.40; 7. Brooke Jeter, 14.42; 8. Morgan Breaux, 14.43; 9. Rozlyn Reeves, 14.54; 10. Margo Crowther, 14.60. Average leaders: 1. Carmel Wright, 30.23 seconds on two runs; 2. Morgan Breaux, 30.44; 3. Shelby McCauley, 30.53; 4. Jennifer Arnold, 30.74; 5. Cassidy Kruse, 30.78; 6. Laura Kennedy, 30.80; 7. Lindsay Sears, 30.83; 8. Fallon Jordan, 30.95; 9. Deb Guelly, 30.99; 10. Brooke Jeter, 31.00; 11. Megan Lewis, 31.01; 12. Natalie Bland, 31.02.

Bull riding leaders: 1. Trey Benton III, 88.5 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Red Rocket; 2. Brennon Eldred, 87.5; 3. (tie) Kyle Balls and Jordan Wacey Spears, 84 each; 5. (tie) Tanner Learmont and John Pitts, 83 each; 7. Garrett Smith, 82.5; 8. (tie) Luke Gee and Josh Frost, 82 each.

postheadericon Teenager Wright rides into the lead

Ryder Wright rides Pete Carr Pro Rodeo's Pendleton Whisky Django for 81 points Saturday night to take the early lead in saddle bronc riding at the San Angelo Stock Show & Rodeo. (RIC ANDERSEN PHOTO)

Ryder Wright rides Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Pendleton Whisky Django for 81 points Saturday night to take the early lead in saddle bronc riding at the San Angelo Stock Show & Rodeo. (RIC ANDERSEN PHOTO)

SAN ANGELO, Texas – Ryder Wright finished last season as the fourth-ranked saddle bronc rider in ProRodeo, but he didn’t compete at the San Angelo Stock Show & Rodeo.

He wasn’t old enough.

The second-generation Wrangler National Finals Rodeo cowboy didn’t turn 18 until March, so he wasn’t eligible for the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. Once he was of age, he didn’t turn back, pocketing nearly $71,000 in six and a half months to earn his first NFR bid, where he put on a masterful performance.

Ryder Wright

Ryder Wright

On Saturday night, Wright made the most of his first experience inside San Angelo Coliseum with an 81-point ride on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Pendleton Whisky Django. That pushed him into the bronc riding lead after three performances.

“I’d never seen that horse before, but I talked with (2015 world champion) Jacobs Crawley about him, and he said the horse was pretty good,” said Wright, the son of two-time world champion Cody Wright. “I just went at him like he was another horse. He was bucking good, and I rode good, so it worked out.”

Yes, it did, but that’s been the case for the young bronc buster from Milford, Utah. In Las Vegas this past December, won the first four go-rounds, then earned another on the ninth night of the 10-round championship. In all, he won $141,154 in Sin City and tripled his season earnings, finishing the campaign with $211,758.

That’s not bad for a cowboy who a season ago was still in high school.

“I have more confidence in my riding after getting on the best horses in the world for 10 days in a row,” said Wright, who was one of six members of his family competing at the NFR, where he was joined by his dad, Cody; a brother, Rusty; two uncles, Jake and Jesse; and an uncle-in-law, CoBurn Bradshaw. “It went good for five rounds, and the other five rounds wasn’t so good.”

That is the nature of bronc riding. Great rides can turn in to no-scores in the blink of an eye. Many cowboys wish they had as much fortune as he had in the Nevada desert.

Since then, though, things haven’t quite gone his way. He’s earned just $6,821 so far in the 2017 season. Still, he’s 20th in the world standings and has seven full months remaining.

“I haven’t won near as much as I’d like to,” Wright said, explaining that the new season actually began Oct. 1, 2016. “I got off to a slow start last fall. I won a little bit in Denver (in January), but not as much as I’d like. I’m just trying to get the ball rolling again.”

Once it starts, there may be no stopping it. The short-term goal is to return to San Angelo Coliseum for the final round on Friday, Feb. 17, where champions will be crowned.

“This is a cool rodeo with great fans,” he said. “I was excited to come here. It was packed, and it’s really loud and awesome.

“Fans are what makes rodeo, and they have some good ones here.”

San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo
Feb. 3-5, Feb. 10-12, Feb. 15-17
Bareback riding leaders:
1. Jamie Howlett, 80 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Ragin Angel; 2. (tie) Justin McDaniel, Joel Schlegel and Luke Creasy, 79 each; 5. Shon Gibson, 76; 6. Tilden Hooper, 75; 7. Grant Denny, 74; 8. Clint Cannon, 72.

Steer wrestling: First round leaders: 1. (tie) Tyler Waguespack and Dakota Eldridge, 3.3 seconds each; 3. (tie) Ty Erickson and Blake Knowles, 3.5 each; 5. Baylor Roche, 3.7; 6. (tie) Kyle Whitaker, Jacob Talley and Jacob Shofner, 3.8 each. Second round leaders: 1. (tie) Baylor Roche, Dirk Tavenner and Josh Peek, 3.5 each; 4. (tie) Trevor Knowles and Blake Knowles, 4.2 each; 6. Josh Garner, 4.5; 7. Dakota Eldridge, 4.7; 8. Jacob Shofner, 5.6. Average leaders: 1. Baylor Roche, 7.2 seconds on two runs; 2. (tie) Josh Peek and Blake Knowles, 7.7 each; 4. Dakota Eldridge, 8.0; 5. Dirk Tavenner, 8.1; 6. Trevor Knowles, 8.2; 7. Josh Garner, 8.8; 8. Jacob Shofner, 9.4.

Team roping: First round leaders: 1. Dustin Egusquiza/Kory Koontz, 4.6 seconds; 2. (tie) Cory Clark/Clint Summers and Jake Cooper/Brady Norman, 5.5 each; 4. Aaron Macy/Evan Arnold, 6.1; 5. Billy Bob Brown/Logan Medlin, 9.2; 6. Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger, 9.3; 7. Kory Kidd/Tyler Worley, 14.6; no other qualified times. Second round leaders: 1. (tie) Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger and Matt Sherwood/Joel Bach, 4.1 seconds each; 3. Zac Small/Will Woodfin, 4.5; no other qualified times. Average leaders: 1. Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger, 13.4 seconds on two runs; 2. Matt Sherwood/Joel Bach, 4.1 seconds on one run; 3. Zac Small/Will Woodfin, 4.5; 4. (tie) Cory Clark/Clint Summers and Jake Cooper/Brady Norman, 5.5 each; 6. Aaron Macy/Evan Arnold, 6.1; 7. Billy Bob Brown/Logan Medlin, 9.2; no other qualified times.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. Ryder Wright, 81 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Pendleton Whisky Django; 2. (tie) Magin Lane Montoya and Dalton Davis, 80 each; 4. Rusty Wright, 75.5; 5. Clint Hopping, 75; 6. (tie) Audy Reed, Luke Butterfield and Nat Stratton, 74 each.

Tie-down roping: First round leaders: 1. Michael Otero, 7.0 seconds; 2. Cody Quaney, 7.8; 3. Ryle Smith, 7.9; 4. Shank Edwards, 8.2; 5. Cory Solomon, 8.6; 6. Josh Peek, 8.7; 7. Timber Moore, 8.9; 8. Sterling Smith, 9.5; 4. (tie) Randall Carlisle and Matt Shiozawa, 10.9 each; 6. Blane Cox, 11.1; 7. Caleb Smidt, 14.2; no other qualified times. Second round leaders: 1. Cody Quaney, 7.0 seconds; 2. Scott Kormos, 7.3; 3. Chant DeForest, 7.6; 4. Chase Williams, 7.7; 5. Riley Pruitt, 8.1; 6. Josh Peek, 8.3; 7. Shank Edwards. 8.9; 8. Timber Moore, 13.8. Average leaders: 1. Cody Quaney, 14.8 seconds on two runs; 2. Josh Peek, 17.0; 3. Shank Edwards, 17.1; 4. Riley Pruitt, 18.9; 5. Timber Moore, 22.7; 6. Chant DeForest, 23.7; 7. Michael Otero, 7.0 seconds on one run; 8; Scott Kormos, 7.3.

Barrel racing: Second round leaders: 1. Laura Kennedy, 14.24 seconds; 2. Lindsay Sears, 14.24; 4. Carmel Wright, 14.39; 4. Brooke Jeter, 14.42; 5. Morgan Breaux, 14.43; 6. Rozlyn Reeves, 14.54; 7. Margo Crowther, 14.60; 8. Fallon Jordan, 14.63; 9. Molly Powell, 14.66; 10. J.J. Baldwin, 14.70. Average leaders: 1. Carmel Wright, 30.23 seconds on two runs; 2. Morgan Breaux, 30.44; 3. Laura Kennedy, 30.80; 4. Lindsay Sears, 30.83; 5. Fallon Jordan, 30.95; 6. Brooke Jeter, 31.00; 7. Kimmi Byler, 31.09; 8. Molly Powell, 31.10; 9. (tie) Rozlyn Reeves and Margo Crowther, 31.15 each; 11. Brogan Macy, 31.16; 12. Madeline Dickens, 31.20.

Bull riding leaders: 1. Trey Benton III, 88.5 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Red Rocket; 2. Brennon Eldred, 87.5; 3. (tie) Tanner Learmont and John Pitts, 83 each; 5. (tie) Luke Gee and Josh Frost, 82 each; 7. (tie) Kyle Zeigler and Diego Benedetti, 80 each.

postheadericon San Angelo through 2nd performance

Bareback riding leaders: 1. Jamie Howlett, 80 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Ragin Angel; 2. (tie) Justin McDaniel and Joel Schlegel, 79; 4. Tilden Hooper, 75; 5. Grant Denny, 74; no other qualified rides.

Steer wrestling: First round leaders: 1. (tie) Tyler Waguespack and Dakota Eldridge, 3.3 seconds each; 3. (tie) Ty Erickson and Blake Knowles, 3.5; 5. Baylor Roche, 3.7; 6. (tie) Kyle Whitaker, Jacob Talley and Jacob Shofner, 3.8.

Tyler Waguespack

Tyler Waguespack

Team roping: First round leaders: 1. (tie) Cory Clark/Clint Summers and Jake Cooper/Brady Norman, 5.5 seconds; 3. Aaron Macy/Evan Arnold, 6.1; 4. Billy Bob Brown/Logan Medlin, 9.2; 5. Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger, 9.3; no other qualified times. Second round leaders: 1. (tie) Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger and Matt Sherwood/Jeol Bach, 4.1 seconds each; 3. Zac Small/Will Woodfin, 4.5; no other qualified times. Average leaders: 1. Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger, 13.4 seconds on two runs; 2. Matt Sherwood/Joel Bach, 4.1 seconds on one run; 3. Zac Small/Will Woodfin, 4.5; 4. (tie) Cory Clark/Clint Summers and Jake Cooper/Brady Norman, 5.5; 6. Aaron Macy/Evan Arnold, 6.1; 7. Billy Bob Brown/Logan Medlin, 9.2. No other qualified times.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. Magin Lane Montoya, 80 points on Pete Carr Pro Rodeo’s Cover Girl; 2. Audy Reed, 74; 3. (tie) Clay Elliott and Cameron Messier, 73 each; 5. Hardy Braden, 72; 6. (tie) Will Smith and Clay Stremler, 70 each; 8. Dylan Henson, 69.

Tie-down roping: First round leaders: 1. Michael Otero, 7.0 seconds; 2. Cody Quaney, 7.8; 3. Ryle Smith, 7.9; 4. Shank Edwards, 8.2; 5. Cory Solomon, 8.6; 6. Josh Peek, 8.7; 7. Timber Moore, 8.9; 8. Sterling Smith, 9.5; 4. (tie) Randall Carlisle and Matt Shiozawa, 10.9 each; 6. Blane Cox, 11.1; 7. Caleb Smidt, 14.2; no other qualified times.

Barrel racing: Second round leaders: 1. Laura Kennedy, 14.24 seconds; 2. Lindsay Sears, 14.24; 3. Brooke Jeter, 14.42; 4. Morgan Breaux, 14.43; 5. Margo Crowther, 14.60; 6. J.J. Baldwin, 14.70; 7. Kirstin Carlson, 14.73; 8. Molly Childers, 14.86; 9. Kimmi Byler, 14.90; 10. (tie) Kortney Cleveland and Kelly Kennedy Joseph, 14.97. Average leaders: 1. Morgan Breaux, 30.44 seconds on two runs; 2. Laura Kennedy, 30.80; 3. Lindsay Sears, 30.83; 4. Brooke Jeter, 31.00; 5. Kimmi Byler, 31.09; 6. Margo Crowther, 31.15; 7. J.J. Baldwin, 31.29; 8. Kirstin Carlson, 31.33; 9. Kelly Kennedy-Joseph, 31.33; 10. Molly Childers, 31.40.

Bull riding leaders: 1. Brennon Eldred, 87.5 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Shellac; 2. Tanner Learmont, 83; 3. Luke Gee, 82; 4. Reid Barker, 78; 5. Clayton Sellars, 77; no other qualified rides.

postheadericon New tandem kicks off season well

SAN ANGELO, Texas – Clint Summers is coming off the best season of his young career, yet 2016 still left a bad taste in his mouth.

The team roper earned more than $48,000 last year while roping with fellow Floridian Dustin Egusquiza and finished 20th in final heeling world standings. That’s five spots shy of qualifying for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, the sport’s grand finale that features only the top 15 contestants in each event.

“When you get that close, it makes your mouth water,” said Summers, a fifth-year professional from Lake City, Fla. “Last year was the first time I had rodeoed full time in a while. We started in May, and it worked out pretty good. Both of us were close to making the finals.”

Clint Summers

Clint Summers

A new season means a fresh start, and it all began Friday night during the opening performance of the San Angelo Stock Show & Rodeo. Summers and his heading partner, Cory Clark, stopped the clock in 5.5 seconds and share the first-round lead with Jake Cooper and Brady Norman.

“This is actually our first rodeo together,” Summers said of Clark. “We’ve known each other forever. He’s a little younger than me, but I think it started out alright.”

It did, and the tandem will make their second-round run during Saturday’s matinee, which begins at 1 p.m. at San Angelo Coliseum.

“We were the first team out, and it’s always a little nerve-racking to be the first ones out in the whole rodeo because you don’t know what the steers are going to do or how the start is going to be for your header,” she said. “We didn’t try to do anything big; we just tried to catch him.

“Now we have to rope our second one tomorrow. We probably need to be a little faster.”

The ultimate goal is to win the championship, but it takes little steps to get there. The first is complete, and the next is to be solid on Saturday. If it all works OK, they will return on Friday, Feb. 17, for the championship round, which will feature the top 12 contestants in each discipline. That’s when champions will be crowned.

“San Angelo has always been pretty decent to me,” said Summers, who has qualified for the short go-round two of the three previous times he’s competed in this Texas community. “The first time I headed for Brad Culpepper and missed in the short round. In my rookie year, I heeled for Arky Rogers, and we finished third.

“You have different rodeos that you find you like because you have some success, and this is one of those for me. I’ve got a lot of confidence here. Every year I’ve been here, the crowd is always packed, and that makes it great. I also like the setup. Back where I’m from on the East Coast, most of the setups are short like this one. I grew up roping on something like this.”

That confidence is important in any competition, but it’s vital for cowboys who make their living in rodeo. There are no guarantees, so catching steers is like catching paychecks for ropers like Summers. He has a whole season to keep catching, and that money not only pays bills and expenses that come with the game; it leads the way to world championships.

In rodeo, dollars equal points, and the contestant in each event who finishes the season with the most money will win the crown.

“When you just miss the NFR, it sure makes you practice harder to get there,” he said.

San Angelo Stock Show and Rodeo
Feb. 3-5, Feb. 10-12, Feb. 15-17
Bareback riding leaders:
No qualified rides.

Steer wrestling: First round leaders: 1. Tyler Waguespack, 3.3 seconds; 2. Ty Erickson, 3.5; 3. (tie) Kyle Whitaker and Jacob Talley, 3.8; 5. Wade Sumpter, 4.2; 6. Nick Guy, 4.4; 7. Timmy Sparing, 4.7; 8. Clayton Hass, 5.5.

Team roping: First round leaders: 1. (tie) Cory Clark/Clint Summers and Jake Cooper/Brady Norman, 5.5 seconds; 3. Aaron Macy/Evan Arnold, 6.1; 4. Billy Bob Brown/Logan Medlin, 9.2; 5. Caleb Smidt/B.J. Dugger, 9.3; no other qualified times.

Saddle bronc riding leaders: 1. Audy Reed, 74 points on Lancaster & Jones’ Badlands; 2. Clay Elliott, 73; 3. Hardy Braden, 72; 4. (tie) Will Smith and Clay Stremler, 70 each; 6. Justin Lawrence, 68; no other qualified rides.

Tie-down roping: First round leaders: 1. Ryle Smith, 7.9 seconds; 2. Cory Solomon, 8.6; 3. Sterling Smith, 9.5; 4. (tie) Randall Carlisle and Matt Shiozawa, 10.9 each; 6. Blane Cox, 11.1; 7. Caleb Smidt, 14.2; no other qualified times.

Barrel racing: Second round leaders: 1. Laura Kennedy, 14.24 seconds; 2. Brooke Jeter, 14.42; 3. Margo Crowther, 14.60; 4. J.J. Baldwin, 14.70; 5. Kirstin Carlson, 14.73; 6. Molly Childers, 14.86; 7. Sarah Rose McDonald, 16.26; 8. Julie Burnett, 19.95; 9. Cambra Smith, 20.10; 10. Michelle Lummus, 25.19; no other qualified times. Average leaders: 1. Laura Kennedy, 30.80 seconds on two runs; 2. Brooke Jeter, 31.00; 3. Margo Crowther, 31.15; 4. J.J. Baldwin, 31.29; 5. Kirstin Carlson, 31.33; 6. Molly Childers, 31.40; 7. Sarah Rose McDonald, 32.82; 8. Julie Burnett, 36.52; 9. Cambra Smith, 36.68; 10. Michelle Lummus, 41.76; 11. Tiany Schuster, 15.79 seconds on one run; 12. Carmel Wright, 15.84.

Bull riding leaders: 1. Brennon Eldred, 87.5 points on Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo’s Shellac; 2. Luke Gee, 82; no other qualified rides.