postheadericon Brazile leads a fast fourth round

GUTHRIE, Okla. – The fourth go-round of the Timed Event Championship of the World was fast and exciting.

In fact, four of the top six fastest round times of the weekend happened Saturday night at the Lazy E Arena. It’s making for an exciting sprint to the finish Sunday afternoon.

Trevor Brazile

Trevor Brazile

“I usually try to not watch much of the other competition, but when it’s as good watching as it is here, the fan in me comes out,” said leader Trevor Brazile, who has posted a 20-run cumulative time of 212.2 seconds, on pace to set a new record for the fastest aggregate. “It’s fun. There are a lot of good runs. There is a lot to be watching for.”

Brazile led the way again Saturday night, posting a 45.8-second go-round – it is the second fastest round so far this weekend behind the 43.7 he posted Friday night. Kyle Lockett, a two-time champion, scored a 48.7, followed by Russell Cardoza’s 51.1 and Jess Tierney’s 52.8.

It all happened before another large crowd.

“They have raised the stakes,” Brazile said, referring to the increased purse of $200,000, of which $100,000 is paid to the average champion. “They doubled first place. That’s a game-changer. You can see it by the contestants and the fans.”

Brazile owns eight of the top 10 fastest times in the Timed Event’s 31-year history, including the top six. He is also the event’s only six-time champion.

“When I have a chance (to post a fast round), and it comes down to the steer roping, it makes me a touch more aggressive,” he said, noting that bonuses are paid to the top six fastest rounds each year. “I didn’t come here to win anything in the rounds. If I have a chance, I try to capitalize on it.”

Brazile owns a 22.5-second lead over the man in second place, defending champion Paul David Tierney, whose older brother, Jess, is third.

RESULTS
AVERAGE LEADERS: 1. Trevor Brazile, 212.2 seconds on 20 runs; 2. Paul David Tierney, 234.7; 3. Jess Tierney, 238.5; 4. Erich Rogers, 272.1; 5. Josh Peek, 298.6; 6. Clay Smith, 315.4.
ROUND 4: 1. Trevor Brazile, 45.8 seconds; 2. Kyle Lockett, 48.7; 3. Russell Cardoza, 51.1; 4. Jess Tierney, 52.8; 5. Paul David Tierney, 55.9; 6. Erich Rogers, 59.8.
FASTEST ROUND LEADERS: 1. Trevor Brazile, 43.7; 2. Trevor Brazile, 45.8; 3. Kyle Lockett, 48.7; 4. Russell Cardoza, 51.1; 5. Erich Rogers, 51.6; 6. Jess Tierney, 52.8.

postheadericon Tierney brothers just behind Brazile

GUTHRIE, Okla. – Between them, the Tierney family owns five Timed Event Championship of the World gold buckles.

Patriarch Paul Tierney earned four in his hall-of-fame career, while youngest son Paul David Tierney is the reigning champ. The Tierneys are tied with K.C. Jones with the second most titles in the “Ironman of ProRodeo” and trail just one man, six-time winner Trevor Brazile.

Trevor Brazile

Trevor Brazile

Through three go-rounds of this year’s championship, Paul David and Jess Tierney sit Nos. 2 and 3 in the average standings and trail just one man, Brazile, who has roped, tied and wrestled 15 head in 166.4 seconds. Paul David is second in 178.8, and Jess has scored 185.7. They are well ahead of the rest of the field: the fourth-place cowboy, Erich Rogers, is 212.3.

“Anybody here is capable of being 2-3 at any time,” Jess Tierney said. “If you get on top of the cattle, you’ve got to take advantage of them.”

Drawing good calves and steers makes a difference in this unique championship, in which each contestant must compete in heading, heeling, tie-down roping, steer wrestling and steer roping.

Jess Tierney

Jess Tierney

“We’re trying to take advantage of a good situation,” he said.

They are, and so is Brazile, a 21-time PRCA world champion who also owns a record 12 all-around gold buckles. He also has had considerable success inside the Lazy E Arena.

“He’s always been the gatekeeper around here,” Jess Tierney said. “He’s such a great cowboy. Even when I’m competing against him, I’m always watching him, trying to learn something. He’s the best.

“He’s an inspiration just watching him.”

The Tierneys grew up with a pretty inspiring person in their father. When they’re at home in South Dakota, they practice all five disciplines that make up the Timed Event. Between that, working on the ranch and having a father who competed in the Lazy E Arena every March for so many years, they are tailor made for the rugged championship.

“Dad always tells us that you’ve got it one run at a time. You’ve just got to look at what you’re doing right then,” Jess Tierney said. “You’ve just got to look at what you’re doing right then. Based on that, we’re staying steady and not trying to get ahead of ourselves much.”

RESULTS
AVERAGE LEADERS:
1. Trevor Brazile, 166.4; 2. Paul David Tierney, 178.8; 3. Jess Tierney, 185.7; 4. Erich Rogers, 212.3; 5. Josh Peek, 224.8; 6. Clay Smith, 241.7
ROUND 3: 1. Trevor Brazile, 56.3 seconds; 2. Paul David Tierney, 57.5; 3. Josh Peek, 58.8; 4. Erich Rogers, 59.3; 5. Jess Tierney, 67.1; 6. Landon McClaugherty, 67.6.

postheadericon Brazile sprints to the Timed Event lead

GUTHRIE, Okla. – Trevor Brazile owns eight of the 10 fastest go-rounds in the history of the Timed Event Championship of the World.

One of those came during the second go-round Friday night at the Lazy E Arena, where the Decatur, Texas, cowboy roped, tied and wrestled five cattle in 43.7 seconds, just two-tenths of a second off the record time he owns. It helped catapult the six-time Timed Event winner to the lead after the opening day with a 10-run cumulative time of 110.1 seconds.

Trevor Brazile

Trevor Brazile

“It feels good, but I don’t mind steer roping being the last event” in a round, said Brazile, a 21-time Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association world champion who owns five steer roping gold buckles. “I feel like I can turn it up in steer roping if I had to. I just didn’t want to do something to set myself up for failure, to be sure to look at the big picture as well as the round.”

He finished Friday night’s round with an 11.1-second steer roping run, which followed a solid 5.6 in steer wrestling, the one event that’s not his focus in ProRodeo. Brazile also owns world titles in tie-down roping and heading and has also qualified for the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in heeling, one of just two men in the sport’s history to qualify for the finale in all four roping disciplines.

“This is one of the few events, with the exception of steer wrestling, that everything else is what I do at home,” he said. “This is an event I get ready for every day year-round. I enjoy being well-rounded.”

It has showed. Nobody has won more Timed Event titles than Brazile, who first won the championship in 1998 when he was 21 years old. Now 38, he continues to prove why he’s one of the greatest cowboys to have ever played the game, and this weekend, he’s competing in a field that includes 19 other elite cowboys.

“I just want to thank the Lazy E and the McKinney family for putting up the money,” he said, referring to the $200,000 purse, of which half goes to the average champion. “They stepped up an event that was so good, but they caught it up to the times. There is a lot of competition this month, and they stepped up to the plate. I think the cowboys did as well. There are a lot of NFR qualifiers here now, and I just like to see that. I want to see the guys that are competing on the biggest stages to come do this, and that’s what it’s enabled them to do.”

RESULTS
AVERAGE LEADERS:
1. Trevor Brazile, 110.1 seconds on 10 runs; 2. Jess Tierney, 118.6; 3. Paul David Tierney, 121.3; 4. Erich Rogers, 153; 5. Clay Smith, 158.6; 6. Josh Peek, 166.0.
ROUND 1: 1. Paul David Tierney, 63.7 seconds; 2. K.C. Jones, 64.6; 3. Dustin Bird, 64.7; 4. Jess Tierney, 64.8; 5. Trevor Brazile, 64.8; 6. Daniel Green, 76.0.

postheadericon Reigning champ leads TEC after Round 1

GUTHRIE, Okla. – Paul David Tierney of Oral, S.D., is proving just why he is the reigning champion of the Timed Event Championship of the World.

Paul David Tierney

Paul David Tierney

On Friday afternoon, Tierney posted a 63.7-second opening round to take the early lead in the 2015 “Ironman of ProRodeo” event. He leads a contingent of veterans, including three other past Timed Event winners: five-time titlist K.C. Jones is second with a 64.6, followed by Dustin Bird, 64.7; Jess Tierney, 64.8; six-time winner Trevor Brazile, 66.4; and three-time champ Daniel Green, 76.0.

“I just wanted to get out of the barrier and go out and make smooth runs,” Paul David Tierney said, meaning he wanted to avoid any penalties for breaking the barrier and not allowing the cattle an appropriate head start. “I almost accomplished it if I wouldn’t have had my steer wrestling steer ball up on me.”

The top 20 timed-event contestants in ProRodeo are part of this elite field competing in one of the most challenging championships in the sport. They compete in heading, tie-down roping, heeling, steer wrestling and steer roping. In Tierney’s run, the bulldogging steer did not fall flat as he needed to make a fast run. The animals are meant to be a test for the cowboy’ skills.

“You don’t’ need to have pups out here,” said Tierney, who, like older brother Jess, is following in the footsteps of their hall-of-fame father, Paul Tierney, a four-time Timed Event titlist. “What helped is growing up doing all these events.

“Doing it all and having my dad to help me come here and do these events.”

Dustin Bird

Dustin Bird

Jess Tierney and Bird are the only two cowboys among the top six who don’t own championships in this unique competition, but they’re bringing a good portion of experience into play. Jess Tierney is a four-time qualifier to the Clem McSpadden National Finals Steer Roping, while Bird is a three-time heading qualifier to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

“A few things I could’ve done better, but for the most part, it’s going pretty decent,” said Bird of Cut Bank, Mont. “It’s not easy; it’s a lot of work. I prepared myself a lot better this year because I knew what to expect. I had some guys help me with some different areas I was not as strong in.”

That’s important, especially if cowboys want to add their name to the prestigious list of champions.

RESULTS

1. Paul David Tierney, 63.7 seconds; 2. K.C. Jones, 64.6; 3. Dustin Bird, 64.7; 4. Jess Tierney, 64.8; 5. Trevor Brazile, 64.8; 6. Daniel Green, 76.0.

postheadericon Cowgirls excited for RNCFR

EDITOR’S NOTE: This story appears in the March edition of Women’s Pro Rodeo News, the official publication of the WPRA. It is republished on this site with the approval of the WPRA.

By the time the Ram National Circuit Finals Rodeo begins March 25, Lindsay and Jesse Kruse will have welcomed their second child.

The baby was due the end of February, giving Mom about a month to have herself and Lenas Mijo Dulce ready for the national championship. Lindsay Kruse is ready for the opportunity.

2015-RNCFR-Logo“I’m really excited to run at it this year,” said Kruse, married to Jesse, the 2009 world champion saddle bronc rider. “I like the new location, and it looks like they are making it a lot more enjoyable for the contestants. It has a bigger purse. I just hope to win some of that money they’ve added this year.”

She maneuvered her way to the RNCFR in Kissimmee, Fla., by having an outstanding season in the Montana Circuit. Her pregnancy prevented Kruse from competing at the Ram Montana Circuit Finals Rodeo in mid-January.

“They let me have a medical exemption,” she said, noting that the exemption allowed her a shot at year-end awards. “I had a decent lead, about $5,000, but I couldn’t defend myself.”

Instead, Carmel Wright won two go-rounds and placed in another to win the average in Great Falls, Mont. She pocketed more than $7,000 and passed Kruse. But by finishing second in the year-end race, Kruse will join Wright in Florida.

“I don’t mind the drive,” Kruse said, noting that the family will be part of the traveling posse. “We usually go to Texas this time of year.”

Her road trip is delayed a little, but she plans to have a pretty good partner in the mix. Harley is a 13-year-old sorrel gelding by Pobre Dulce and out of Lenas Country Bar. This marks Kruse’s sixth RNCFR qualification and Harley’s second.

“He’s tough,” she said. “He likes being on the road. He just likes to do it. His personality is better when you’re on the road.

“He’s kind of a quirky thing. He doesn’t get along with many people. You definitely have to have a bond with him.”

That’s a good thing for Kruse, who said she and Harley just clicked from the first day they got together.

“He’s all cow-bred with no barrel breed in him,” she said. “He’s kind of odd-shaped, but he’s pretty in his own way.”

It works, but so does the relationship between Sara Rose McDonald and her horse, Fame Fling N Bling, a 9-year-old roan mare she calls Bling. Like Kruse, McDonald finished as the year-end runner-up to Victoria Williams, who also won the average at the Ram Southeastern Circuit Finals Rodeo.

“I’m excited to go there because it’s close to home,” said McDonald of Brunswick, Ga., the Southeastern Circuit and WPRA Rookie of the Year. “I know it’s a good rodeo, so I just want to make good runs.”

Gretchen Benbenek

Gretchen Benbenek

That’s exactly what happened for Gretchen Benbenek last year. She took advantage of the tournament-style format and raced to the national championship last spring at the Lazy E Arena near Guthrie, Okla.

She placed fifth in the opening go-round and was solid on the second run on Shot of Firewater, a 12-year-old bay she calls Maverick. The speedster is by Firem Jet and out of Miss Willie Ada; Maverick’s mom was Benbenek’s primary mount before the gelding came into his own.

By finishing third in the two-round average, the tandem advanced to the RNCFR’s semifinals, finishing second to Kassidy Dennison. Benbenek and Maverick excelled on their final run, picking up more than $13,000 and a $20,000 voucher for a new pickup.

“Other than the Prairie Circuit Finals, I’ve never been in the position to defend a title,” said Benbenek, the two-time reigning Prairie Circuit year-end champion from Aubrey, Texas. “I feel a little pressure about it, but it’s a brand new arena that I’ve never been to.

“I just need to go in there hungry and wanting it and determined, then we’ll see how it goes.”

It helps that she has a good experience, albeit in Oklahoma’s red dirt and not in the shadow of Disney World.

“I think Florida has shown a lot of interest in rodeo lately, and it doesn’t have any other big events there,” she said. “I can already feel there’s a new level of excitement. I’ve never got to rodeo in Florida. I hear the facility is really nice, and I think it will be a good place for my horse in me.

“It’s right there by Disney World, and I’ve got some family coming down so we can do something else while we’re there.”

Her focus, though, is defending that national championship. Though the winter has been relatively slow for Benbenek, she has a lot of faith in Maverick.

“I like to give my horse a good break over the winter,” Benbenek said. “He’s been running good. We’ve just been a little bit out of (the money). We haven’t hit our stride.

“I go everywhere to win. I don’t go to get second place or just show up. I have expectations of winning. I realize the competition there is going to be very tough, and winning is not an easy thing to do. As long as I feel like I can make the best run I can and as long as me and my horse are physically prepared, I’ll be happy with the outcome.”

That’s the attitude of a proven winner.

postheadericon Ranger women dominant in Kansas

ALVA, Okla. – It takes just one word to describe the Northwestern Oklahoma State University women’s team performance this past weekend: Dominating.

The Rangers women posted 455 points to run away with the Garden City (Kan.) Community College rodeo title. Lauren Barnes of Buckeye, Ariz., won the all-around championship with 195 points, parlaying a second-place finish in goat-tying and a fourth-place run in barrel racing to take the crown.

Laremie Allred

Laremie Allred

But she was just one of six Northwestern women who were part of the championship round Sunday afternoon. She was joined on the leaderboard by goat-tier Laremi Allred of Kanarraville, Utah, who won the short-round and the two-run average title by two-tenths of a second over Barnes.

“We’re pretty strong and pretty deep, so that’s beneficial for everyone involved,” said Allred, who transferred to Northwestern for the spring semester, making Garden City just her second Central Plains Region rodeo for the Rangers. “I like the school and the rodeo program we have here. We have some pretty good coaches and the opportunity to practice whenever we want.”

The proof was in the performance in the western Kansas community that was in the middle of a winter storm the week of the rodeo. Besides Allred and Barnes atop the goat-tying standings, Shayna Miller of Faith, S.D., finished third. Karley Kile, of Topeka, Kan., also was in the final round.

Barnes, who won the first round in barrel racing with a 13.79-second run, earned more points for the team by placing in the average. She was joined in the short round by Paige Winnett of Elmore City, Okla., who placed in both rounds and finished fifth in the two-run aggregate. Cassy Woodward of Dupree, S.D., placed in the final round.

“My goal this year is to be in the top three in goat tying and make the college finals,” Allred said. “If I can sneak in there in the breakaway (roping), that would be nice, too.”

Northwestern is well represented in the region standings, which the Rangers lead as a team. Miller is atop the goat-tying standings, followed by Barnes in third, Kile in sixth, Allred in eighth and Elli Jo Price in 12th.

For Allred, Garden City came together quite nicely, especially considering she was utilizing her brother’s steer wrestling horse to win the goat tying title. Her primary horse was injured in an vehicle wreck in which the truck and trailer rolled twice while en route from Utah to Alva to begin the semester.

“She’s still not healed yet,” Allred said, noting that the runs in Garden City were the first for the borrowed mount. “She worked pretty good, and I’ll probably keep hauling her.”

The Northwestern men had six cowboys compete in the championship round, led by tie-down roper Wade Perry of Lamont, Okla., who won the first round and finished second in the aggregate. Chase Lako of Hunter, N.D., placed sixth. Steer wrestler Laine Herl of Goodland, Kan., finished second in the first round and fell to third in the average, while Stephen Culling of Fort St. John, British Columbia, was third in the opening round and six in the average.

In team roping, header Dalton Richards of Hawkinsville, Ga., finished third in the average, roping with heeler Ben Whiddon of Southeastern Oklahoma State University, while Northwestern heeler Dustin Searcy of Mooreland, Okla., was the runner-up in the opening round while competing with Hunter Munsell of Western Oklahoma State College.

postheadericon Top cowboys heading to Bay City

BAY CITY, Texas – Many of the greatest cowboys and cowgirls in rodeo make their way to Bay City every March.

It’s all because of the Matagorda County Fair & Rodeo, set for 7 p.m. Thursday, March 5-Saturday, March 7, at the Matagorda County Fairgrounds. They know the opportunity is there each of the three nights to cash in and make the run of their dreams toward the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo.

Clint Cannon

Clint Cannon

Bay City also is the weekend home of many of the greatest animal athletes the game, thanks to the livestock from Pete Carr’s Classic Pro Rodeo. This past December, 27 Carr horses and bulls were a big part of the NFR, a ProRodeo record the Carr firm has held each of the past two years.

“Pete Carr has the bucking horses and bulls that are unreal,” said bareback rider Clint Cannon, a four-time NFR qualifier from nearby Waller, Texas. “When I think about Pete Carr, I think about 90-point rides, rock ’n’ roll music and fans loving it.”

A year ago, there were several NFR animals that were part of the action at the Matagorda County Fair and Rodeo, including five of the six animals that guided cowboys to the pay window in bareback riding. Two, Sadies Gal and Utopia, made their first trips to Las Vegas this past December, kick-starting their outstanding campaigns in this southeast Texas community.

Sage Kimzey

Sage Kimzey

“Pete Carr puts on a great rodeo,” said Sage Kimzey, the 2014 world champion bull rider from Strong City, Okla. “I’m thankful he loves the sport of rodeo so much and wants it to be so great.”

Kimzey isn’t the only world champion who follows the Carr herd around the country. Take two-time world champion Cody Wright of Milford, Utah, the reigning Bay City champion in saddle bronc riding. He matched moves with Deuces Wild to win the title last March.

Wright utilized that momentum to qualify for the NFR for the 12th straight year, but there were several finals qualifiers who are regular qualifiers to the finale.

“Pete’s got an eye for horses, and he’s surrounded himself with people who know what they’re talking about,” said saddle bronc rider Heith DeMoss, a six-time NFR from Heflin, La. “You want to go to Pete’s rodeos, because you’re going to get on something good.”

The Carr animals are a huge drawing card for contestants. That also is why fans want to be part of the Matagorda County Fair & Rodeo experience.

postheadericon World’s best are excited for TEC

RODEO’S ELITE READY TO CHASE THE $100,000 PRIZE FOR THE WINNER

GUTHRIE, Okla. – The incentives at the Timed Event Championship of the World are great for the world’s greatest cowboys.

From the challenges set forth through the rugged competition to the opportunity to play their game in one of the most storied arenas in rodeo, the annual championship is a destination for the elite timed-event contestants.

Daniel Green

Daniel Green

Add into the mix a first-time purse of $200,000 – with $100,000 going to this year’s average winner – and it’s easy to see why 20 men who make up 39 combined gold buckles will be part of the 2015 Timed Event Championship of the World, set for noon and 7:30 p.m. Friday, noon and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday.

“Any time a cowboy can win more money, it’s good,” said Daniel Green, a three-time champion from Oakdale, Calif. “The Timed Event is not an easy deal to win; it’s really difficult. It takes so much that has to go right.

“My hat’s off to the owners for boosting financial support for the event. Being as tough as it is and a World Championship event, it should pay in that range.”

The players compete in five go-rounds and must make runs in heading, tie-down roping, heeling, steer wrestling and steer roping in each. It is dubbed the “Ironman of ProRodeo” because of its rugged nature. Spread over just three days, it’s a test of talent, durability and endurance.

Paul David Tierney

Paul David Tierney

The field includes some of the brightest young stars in rodeo, including reigning champion Paul David Tierney of Oral, S.D., and the 2014 reserve champ, Clay Smith of Broken Bow, Okla.

They’ll test their talent against an amazing list of top cowboys, including Green; 27-time world champion Trevor Brazile of Decatur, Texas, who owns 21 Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association titles and a record six Timed Event crowns; five-time winner K.C. Jones of Burlington, Wyo.; two-time titlist Kyle Lockett of Visalia, Calif.; and 2010 champ Josh Peek of Pueblo, Colo.

This is the one event in ProRodeo where the greatest ropers will wrestle steers and where elite bulldoggers and a Linderman Award winner will test their other skills in an action-packed weekend of world-class talent.

Official Invited Timed Event Championship of the World Contestants
Current Listing and Subject to Change

  1. Paul David Tierney, Oral, South Dakota
  2. Clay Smith, Broken Bow, Oklahoma
  3. Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Oregon
  4. K.C. Jones, Burlington, Wyoming
  5. Daniel Green, Oakdale, California
  6. Clayton Hass, Terrell, Texas
  7. Dustin Bird, Cut Bank, Montana
  8. Landon McClaugherty, Tilden, Texas
  9. Dakota Eldridge, Elko, Nevada
  10. Cody Doescher, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  11. Trell Etbauer, Gruver, Texas
  12. Erich Rogers, Round Rock, Arizona
  13. Jess Tierney, Hermosa, South Dakota
  14. Shank Edwards, Levelland, Texas
  15. Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colorado
  16. Kyle Lockett, Visalia, California
  17. Jo Jo LeMond, Andrews, Texas
  18. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas
  19. Trevor Knowles, Mt. Vernon, Oregon
  20. Cade Swor, Winnie, Texas

postheadericon Carr stock shines in San Angelo

The Pete Carr animal athletes were a major part of the big winning at the San Angelo Stock Show Rodeo’s Cinch Shootout on Saturday night.

SanAngelo-LogoReigning PRCA Bareback Horse of the Year Dirty Jacket guided Jessy Davis to the winning 93-point ride. Spur Strap, a two-time selection to buck at the NFR, helped Jesse Wright to the saddle bronc riding title with an 87.

Meanwhile, Wes Stevenson finished second in bareback riding with a 92 on Good Time Charlie.

In the opening round, the top three bareback scores were all from Carr horses. Davis on Outa Sight and Stevenson on Scarlet’s Web both posted 90s, while Tanner Aus was third with an 87 on Fancy Free.

Wright won the first round in bronc riding with a 90-point ride on Big Tex, while Sam Spreadborough was fourth on Cool Runnings. In bull riding, Ty Wallace rode Hermes for 88.5 to finish first in the opening round. Josh Koschel placed second with an 86.5 on Rattler, while Trevor Kastner qualified for the final-four on time; he bucked off near the 8-second whistle.

postheadericon San Angelo short round will be great

Tonight’s championship round of the San Angelo (Texas) Stock Show will be a showcase of Pete Carr bucking stock.

SanAngelo-LogoThe short go-round will begin at 7:30 p.m. Central time in the west Texas community and features the top 12 contestants from preliminary rounds. In the mix will be world champions and regular Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifiers.

Most of the roughstock cowboys will have an opportunity to win big money on Carr animals. In fact, there are 27 Carr horses and bulls. Of those, 15 have been selected to perform at the NFR.

There are some fantastic match-ups on tap, too, including:

BAREBACK RIDING
Austin Foss-First Kiss
Brian Bain-Cool Change
Bobby Mote-Ladies Man
Bill Tutor-River Boat Annie
Tanner Aus-Betty Boop

SADDLE BRONC RIDING
Cody DeMoss-Gold Coast
Sam Spreadborough-Miss Congeniality
Cody Taton-Lori Darling
Bradley Harter-Sweet Maria

BULL RIDING
Howdy Cloud-Poker Face
Brennon Elred-Thunder Cat
Corey Maier-Half Nuts
Lon Danley-Hokey Pokey
Dalan Duncan-Missing Parts

It should be a fantastic show.