postheadericon Don’t forget to pass the roll

Bareback rider Matt Bright, left, smiles as saddle bronc rider Jesse James Kirby shows off his riding gear that Bright is wearing during the first performance of the Will Rogers Stampede in Claremore, Okla. Bright, who left his rigging bag in Texas, borrowed equipment to compete in Claremore and finished in a tie for second place, worth $736.

Bareback rider Matt Bright, left, smiles as saddle bronc rider Jesse James Kirby shows off his riding gear that Bright is wearing during the first performance of the Will Rogers Stampede in Claremore, Okla. Bright, who left his rigging bag in Texas, borrowed equipment to compete in Claremore and finished in a tie for second place, worth $736.

Matt Bright got out of his pickup, stretched a bit, then walked back to open the door to his camper.

That’s where he stopped.

With his hand on the door, Bright’s head slumped a bit. He stormed back to the front of the truck, grabbed his phone and headed to the Will Rogers Roundup Club Arena in Claremore, Okla. He was a man on a mission, and a few minutes after witnessing all that, I found out why.

Matt Bright

Matt Bright

You see Bright, a two-time bareback riding qualifier to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, didn’t have his much needed gear back in his truck. The bag – which contains his rigging, vest, boots and spurs, riding jeans, MGM Grand chaps and neck roll – had been left in the trunk of his brother’s vehicle.

Unsure of what to do, the Azle, Texas, cowboy started asking around. He found another right-handed bareback rider, Johnathan Taylor, who allowed Bright to borrow the rigging and specially made bareback riding glove. He located boots, chaps and a vest from saddle bronc rider Jesse James Kirby and borrowed those.

When it came time for competition, Bright matched moves with the Rafter H Rodeo colt Red Head and scored 72 points – that held up to finish in a tie for second place worth $736. Everything worked out OK, except for that last few seconds of riding on the young horse.

“It felt fine until the 6-second mark, and that’s when I really missed my neck roll,” Bright said – bareback riders, whose hands are wedged into a rigging that’s strapped tightly around a horse’s chest, feel the impact of almost every jump and kick a horse makes during that eight-second ride, so the neck roll helps relieve some of the pressure that comes from that.

While he made a nice paycheck in Claremore, I don’t see him riding without that piece of equipment again. Neither does Matt Bright.

Leave a Reply

*

Our Partners

RodeoMediaRelations

4BWebDesign

EverythingCowboy

Photos

twisTEDrodeoPhotos